Posts Tagged ‘Kale’

First Snow

Autumn and Winter danced this morning, with lacinato and purple kale chaperones.

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Garden Update: The Good, The Bad, and the Undetermined

Despite last week’s heatwave into the mid-nineties, which we had not reached all Summer, signs of Autumn continue to reveal themselves. A cool breeze here, crunchy leaves there, along with more squirrel activity than I’ve seen since Spring.

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It’s also the start of Fall bulb planting season, and — since CPL (crazy plant lady) ordered those bulbs before what turned out to be a slightly dislocated rib causing all the neck and upper chest pain — I’ve got a lot of bulbs to plant. Not the 1,000 I planted Continue reading

Edible Flowers

I just got a newsletter update from the Phoenix-based Agriscaping with Justin Rohner. We have snow on the ground here in Indiana, and I know much of the East Coast is undergoing “Snowmageddon.” Who doesn’t like flowers, though? If you live in a warmer climate zone, you can grow these now. If you’re shivering inside, you can start planning for spring or just enjoy the virtual blooms:

Kale Cat: Come Hither Kale Strikes Again!

Back in December 2013, my Blue Scotch Kale began sending out pheromones and/or seductive telepathic vibes to my non-kale eating friends! David and I had a good chuckle, which I shared in a now nearly two year old post, Come Hither Kale, Mr. Candyland Game, Seductive Books, and a Black-Eyed Gnome. There’s just something special about that kale!

All Summer, my friend Linette has told me how much their cat loves my kale, and now she’s sent the photos to prove it. Here’s Sasha basking in the love of kale:

Sasha loves kale!

Sasha loves kale!

Kale Cat 2

Apparently, Sasha also loves to nibble on kale and roll around in it like catnip. Well, then! I guess we’ll see who else the Blue Scotch Kale seduces this Fall. Lacinato here just gets eaten, but apparently, Blue Scotch also loves to flirt.

Garden Fresh in January

Some people have inquired if David and I still have garden produce now that we’ve officially entered winter. Indeed, we do! Yesterday afternoon I harvested a bunch of kale, chard, collards and spinach, and our Fairy Tale Pumpkins have continued to ripen indoors. I had planted carrots all over the place as part of a beneficial bugs cover crop mixture, so we’ve also got white carrots galore, which I harvest whenever desired. Below, you can see the Fairy Tale Pumpkin we cut and steamed last night, along with a carrot and the greens:

pumpkin greens and carrot

Part of the steamed pumpkin will go to the freezer, but last night we made a curried coconut pumpkin soup with adzuki beans, celery, homegrown dehydrated and powdered kale, and homegrown carrots. Super yum! We’ll enjoy leftovers later this week. The night before, we used some green tomato salsa I had canned in Fall 2013 — as an enchilada sauce over refried beans, homegrown and frozen serpent gourd (tastes like zucchini), onions, garlic, homegrown jalapeno, and organic corn tortillas. So yummy we forgot to snap a photo!

Beginning today, we’ll have a week of single digit or even negative lows, hence the abundance of greens harvested. Still, I’ve got thick AGRIBON row covers over thinner row covers under a cold frame, so I suspect at least those plants will live. The kale and collards came from our uncovered front yard garden, which has continued to produce with zero protection.

The indoor plants are less happy due to an almost total lack of sun for months; however, I’m mentally telling Mr. Meyer Lemon tree about the Bealtaine Cottage revival of a discarded, forlorn lemon tree found in the compost. You can do it, Meyer! Although I refuse to put fluorescent lights in our home, I do try to make up for that by bribing faeries with raw emeralds and dropping a crystal elixer from Tania Marie onto the ailing avocado and lemon trees. Just a few more months before porch time! You can do it. 🙂

Winter Garden Update ~ Plants Alive After Minus 15 Degrees!

We had some rain and above freezing temperatures, so I opened the cold frame to see if anything had survived the verrrrry deep freeze earlier this week. Um, wow. Many of my plants are still alive! I didn’t harvest much, but you can see some kale, tat soi and radish greens here:

January greens after deep freeze

David snapped this Suessian photo of our Winterbor kale earlier in the week:

January kale

That and the other two Winterbor varieties are still alive. The dwarf Siberian, lacinato and outside Red Russian kale all look pretty frostbitten, but the Siberian and Red Russian might make a comeback. I also lifted the shower curtain I have covering one of the InstaBeds with the tree collards, intending to overwinter that favorite perennial. It had about 8 inches of snow on top, but the tree collards, Lucullus chard, cilantro and leeks were all still alive with no frost burn, either. In the cold frame, the Lucullus chard looked less happy, but it remains alive, along with thyme, collard greens, beets, carrots and more. Pretty amazing.

We might be one of the very few local people to have greens growing after the insanely cold (minus forty with the windchill) early part of this week. We noticed our co-op had zero local greens and even minimum fresh offerings from elsewhere. I remember that from last year, which is one reason I felt so adamant about having a winter garden this year. No sign of my mache yet, but supposedly those seeds are super slow to germinate. We shall see…

Time to eat a stirfry with some of those fresh greens thrown in. Yay!

Winter Wonderland in Goshen

The frost faeries graced our porch this morning.

The frost faeries graced our porch this morning.

Even the Foo Dogs are cold!

Even the Foo Dogs are cold!

As of yesterday, the cold frame was hunkered down in two feet of snow, even after a brush off.

As of yesterday, the cold frame was hunkered down in two feet of snow, even after a brush off.

I harvested a bunch and a half of Winterbor kale before the heaviest snows piled on. (This photo shows about 4 inches less snow than we have.)

I harvested a bunch and a half of Winterbor kale before the heaviest snows piled on. (This photo shows about 4 inches less snow than we have.)

Snow time in Faery Town (houses courtesy of Grandma Van), but their train keeps running. :)

Snow time in Faery Town (houses courtesy of Grandma Van), but their train keeps running. 🙂

Where the morning glories were ...

Where the morning glories were …

Just inside from the above photo!

Just inside from the above photo!

This little birdie watches over the gnomes, foo dogs and faery homes. Minus forty with the windchill, but warm-hearted cheer on the porch!

This little birdie watches over the gnomes, foo dogs and faery homes. Minus forty with the windchill, but warm-hearted cheer on the porch!