Posts Tagged ‘Wood Mulch Gardening’

Garden Update ~ Last Photos Before the First Frost

In anticipation of last Friday’s potential first frost, I spent last Thursday and Friday on a mad dash to harvest in between phone and in person sessions. Although extremely busy, I also realized that Friday offered the last chance to capture the summer and early fall’s visual bounty, as well. Here are some of those photos, and yes, the frost faeries did arrive on Saturday and Sunday nights. All those lovely zinnias, cosmos and nasturtiums are now on their way to compost. What a feast for the eyes, soul and tummy we had this year! I feel so much gratitude to the Land for bringing joy and nourishment into so many lives.

front paths

This little strip of chard and geraniums still lives happily under a mini tunnel.

This little strip of chard and geraniums still lives happily under a mini tunnel.

The backyard was getting sleepy, and, as of yesterday, has largely been put to bed for winter.

The backyard was getting sleepy, and, as of yesterday, has largely been put to bed for winter.

The newly mulched areas should be a riot of tulips next spring.

The newly mulched areas should be a riot of tulips next spring.

a very small snapshot of Friday's harvest

a very small snapshot of Friday’s harvest

Thursday's harvest

Thursday’s harvest

The pineapple sage (the red flowers) said goodbye, but not before I took a cutting for next year.

The pineapple sage (the red flowers) said goodbye, but not before I took a cutting for next year.

We still have a few marigolds, which the bumblebees love at this time of year.

We still have a few marigolds, which the bumblebees love at this time of year.

Most of these flowers gave up the ghost this weekend, although the yellow calendula and pink four o'clocks have survived for now.

Most of these flowers gave up the ghost this weekend, although the yellow calendula and pink four o’clocks have survived for now.

I had left yesterday mostly open for yard clean up, and I enjoyed a gusty day full of sunshine and rustling leaves as I piled up frostbitten plants for David to run over with the mulch mower. Quick compost for raised beds! Yesterday also included distributing another six or seven bags of used coffee grounds delivered by the owner of our local coffee shop. He delivers probably 25 trash bags of spent grounds to me each season. As a thank you, I left him one of the “medium sized” green striped cushaw squashes, which as you can see in the photo above, are still huge.

I joke that I’m on everybody’s waste stream, but I truly am. Knowing I don’t drive, people here are kind enough to deliver large bike boxes, coffee grounds, and truckloads of wood mulch, pretty much all season long, whenever I ask. Friday, the yard will gratefully receive another waste stream created by attempts to manage an invasive species. the The yard will stink for a few days, but those hundreds of spring bulbs and new fruit bushes will be mighty happy for the boost, especially in the yard next door, which has never received a treatment.

I’m down to my last 200 bulbs to plant, LOL, so faeries willing, I’ll get those in by Friday in between sessions and with the much appreciated help of a gardener in training. The front easement below used to be a horrid patch of weeds and uneven ground. Last year, I had the city plant two serviceberry trees, but the rest of it sat under two feet of cardboard and wood mulch, through which grass and weeds still managed to grow until I planted everything this year. I loved the colors this summer and fall. Hopefully, all those bulbs I scattered among flowers will put on quite the welcome show for spring. Cheers!

easement

Back to Eden Multilingual DVD Indiegogo Campaign

The good folks at Back to Eden (the film that inspired my wood mulch gardening technique that has now spread to many yards in Goshen) contacted me to let me know of a new Indiegogo campaign to raise money for a multilingual DVD teaching organic farming methods to people around the world.

Selections from their email and website:

The Back to Eden Multilingual DVD will be a tool to teach organic gardening, help feed the hungry worldwide, and dramatically reduce the global impact of drought and famine! Back to Eden gardening method can reduce irrigation by 90%! HELP FUND Back to Eden Multilingual DVD TODAY! http://igg.me/at/backtoedendvd

Film Synopsis

After years of back-breaking toil in ground ravaged by the effects of man-made growing systems, Paul Gautschi has discovered a taste of what God intended for mankind in the garden of Eden. Some of the vital issues facing agriculture today include soil preparation, fertilization, irrigation, weed control, pest control, crop rotation, and PH issues. None of these issues exist in the unaltered state of nature or in Paul’s gardens and orchards. “Back to Eden” invites you to take a walk with Paul as he teaches you sustainable organic growing methods that are capable of being implemented in diverse climates around the world.
Featuring 18 languages, the Back to Eden Multilingual DVD will teach you how growing your own food can change your life. HELP FUND Back to Eden Multilingual DVD TODAY! http://igg.me/at/backtoedendvd

If you feel led, please send some love and/or funding their way. If you’ve not seen the film, Back to Eden, I highly recommend it, whatever your faith or gardening ability. Paul Gautschi’s enthusiasm is contagious, and he really has a way of connecting his spirituality with the abundance of the land. I’ve hauled something like 27,000 pounds of wood mulch around our little yard since April 2013, and even I cannot believe the transformation of this once neglected, weedy, unhealthy, broken land. Vitality, beauty and productivity have returned. My heart fills with joy to walk outside now, whereas when we first moved to Goshen, I called it “soul crushing” to leave our house. Miracles do happen, and sometimes they begin with one man sharing an inspired idea. That, and a whole messa wood mulch. 😉

Garden Update: Pumpkins, Pickles, Kraut, Cardboard and Mulch … Oh, and Flowers!

It’s been awhile since I posted a garden update, but that’s not for lack of things going on in the garden. On the contrary, I’ve been too busy doing to post about doing. Here are some recent photos and commentary:

These backyard raised beds are humming with activity and color. You can also just catch a peek of the goji berry bushes against the neighbors' south facing garage.

These backyard raised beds are humming with activity and color. You can also just catch a peek of the goji berry bushes against the neighbors’ south facing garage.

Our first fairy tale pumpkin has made an appearance. We have some others started, too, but not this big.

Our first fairy tale pumpkin has made an appearance. We have some others started, too, but not this big.

The five-way dwarf apple tree continues to leaf out. It's doing much better than the dwarf fruit cocktail tree and the service berry trees I also planted from bare root. Those have minimal leafing and/or just a hint of buds.

The five-way dwarf apple tree continues to leaf out. It’s doing much better than the dwarf fruit cocktail tree and the service berry trees I also planted from bare root. Those have minimal leafing and/or just a hint of buds.

Meyer Lemon Tree and friends. He recently got staked for better posture. In the foreground you can see our mystery ornamental, hyssop, good bugs mix, and in the background, our quince, black lace elderberry and some sunflowers.

Meyer Lemon Tree and friends. He recently got staked for better posture. In the foreground you can see our mystery ornamental, hyssop, good bugs mix, and in the background, our quince, black lace elderberry and some sunflowers.

Our everbearing mulberry tree "doubled its height" when I added two more stakes for its floppy form. We have another mulberry tree for the birds. This one's for us!

Our everbearing mulberry tree “doubled its height” when I added two more stakes for its floppy form. We have another mulberry tree for the birds. This one’s for us!

In other vertical gardening news, the red malabar spinach has gone to flower before producing much in the way of vines or leaves. It's just been too cool this summer for the heat loving crops like okra, basil and malabar spinach to thrive. On the flip side, that makeshift trellis has been great for a black raspberry bush that's tripled in size this season.

In other vertical gardening news, the red malabar spinach has gone to flower before producing much in the way of vines or leaves. It’s just been too cool this summer for the heat loving crops like okra, basil and malabar spinach to thrive. On the flip side, that makeshift trellis has been great for a black raspberry bush that’s tripled in size this season.

The scarlet runner bean teepees have formed a hedge!

The scarlet runner bean teepees have formed a hedge!

Our other trellised black raspberry bushes nicely showcase the cardboard paths getting ready for mulch.

Our other trellised black raspberry bushes nicely showcase the cardboard paths getting ready for mulch.

Yes, we have more mulch! This is the third load this size or larger this year. I'll need to clear it fast, because I don't think I'm technically allowed to have it on the easement spilling over into the road.

Yes, we have more mulch! This is the third load this size or larger this year. I’ll need to clear it fast, because I don’t think I’m technically allowed to have it on the easement spilling over into the road.

At least the butterfly garden up front distracts attention from the mulch. :)

At least the butterfly garden up front distracts attention from the mulch. 🙂

The bee habitat helps, too.

The bee habitat helps, too.

So does this happy polyculture up front.

So does this happy polyculture up front.

And these crazy tall sunflowers bloomed just as the Lemon Queen ones started looking spent.

And these crazy tall sunflowers bloomed just as the Lemon Queen ones started looking spent.

Perhaps most exciting, though: we finally, after nearly a year, have rain barrels installed! We still need a couple tweaks for maximum efficiency and flow, plus my Mother Nature and Tree of Life stickers, but otherwise, they're good to go.

Perhaps most exciting, though: we finally, after nearly a year, have rain barrels installed! We still need a couple tweaks for maximum efficiency and flow, but otherwise, they’re good to go.

Exciting times inside, as well: this past week I've made two kinds of sauerkraut and two batches of pickles. Our cabbage and cucumber harvests are off the hook. Apparently, they like this "Northern California Coastal" summer as much as I do.

Exciting times inside, as well: this past week I’ve made two kinds of sauerkraut and two batches of pickles. Our cabbage and cucumber harvests are off the hook. Apparently, they like this “Northern California Coastal” summer as much as I do.

There’s more, but that gives a glimpse into life at Faery-Hof, as my dad named our little plot of neglected land loved and harmonized into beauty and productivity. I still see all the things that need to be done, but compared to last year? We’ve come a long way, baby! Happy Sunday!