Posts Tagged ‘Visionary Artists’

Jon Rappoport ~ The Strange Fear of Symbols

I was about to leave a comment on Jon Rappoport’s site and decided instead to post my (expanded) comment as an intro to his post, published below my comment.

Hi Jon, thanks for this. The abject terror of any “occult” symbols just because some would-be controllers have claimed them as their own and held them hostage is a bizarre thing to observe, indeed. I’ve long advocated that people reclaim co-opted symbols and/or invent their own … but also spend some time studying how people respond to symbols. Although symbols don’t have power in and of themselves, a study of any effective ad campaign or televised ritual (Grammy’s, Olympics, etc.) that produces results would seem to indicate that we can leverage tremendous power with symbols that speak directly to the non-rational mind.

As an artist, I often incorporate symbols into art that I create with specific magical intentions, i.e. intending that the artistic representation takes form in the “real” world. I can’t explain it, and it would sound crazy if I tried; however, the things I paint do directly appear in my own life. But only if I tag them with symbols (especially Runic Code). If I just paint something colorful or imitative, nothing unusual occurs, but if I paint something with layers upon layers of symbols, even without a conscious intention, then I start seeing elements of that painting reflected in “real” life.

I found this dynamic while writing my second novel, too. Whatever situations I’d create for my characters and code with certain symbols (especially Runic associations), the next day I would get calls or emails from new clients experiencing that exact scenario. Most of these plot twists were bizarre and specific, so after awhile, there was no explaining away the new clients as mere coincidence. I also started meeting people who looked like my characters or had their names. My partner, whom I met long after shelving that novel, has two spinster aunts with similar features, body types and personalities to two of my characters who come into their own in the second novel. I actually stopped writing that book until I could figure out a way to stop making it come true in non-fiction life or find a way to advance the plot without conflict and harm to my characters.

As you’ve long noted, the Imagination is more powerful than most people realize. Symbols activate it. I don’t know precisely how, but I’ve experimented a lot because I initially didn’t believe it could be so true. I live in a world of extreme synchronicity anyway, but when I paint symbols into an image with specific intentions, I can count on those intentions coming true in absurd and delightful ways far outside the normal chain of events. Magical rituals utilize symbols for similar reasons. I think of them as shorthand for a whole bunch of intentions and associations whose listing would bog down the creative process. Perhaps witches and artists tune into past life or ancestral associations with those symbols. I don’t know the exact method, but I have experimented and observed enough to know that symbols do carry at least proxy power when activated by our imaginations.

Recognizing our freedom and power to create carries with it a responsibility for that which we create. Exploring and honoring how symbols can aid or thwart that manifestation process involves more than simple superstition. It can become a practical study on the path to wisdom. Reclaiming co-opted tools can tip the scales of this world back in favor of a peaceful, healed and abundant planet. I would call that effective visioning and creation as opposed to “mind control.” If advertisers, propagandists and religions can use symbols to control us, then it only stands to reason that we, too, can use symbols — as tools to heal and liberate ourselves.

The strange fear of symbols
by Jon Rappoport

March 13, 2014

http://www.nomorefakenews.com

Groups use symbols.

But symbols have no inherent power.

None.

They have power only when people believe in them. In which case it’s the belief that is the power.

Just as important, symbols have no inherent meaning. They only have the meaning given to them.

So, for example, the famous eye and pyramid mean zero. Zilch. They only have meaning because Masons and other groups have assigned it.

There is no closed secret world of symbols that has magic in it.

There are no universally good symbols or bad symbols. A symbol is a word, term, sign, shape. It’s injected with meaning by a group. The group adopts a consensus about the symbol.

To a surprising degree, people think in terms of symbols. They operate as if they understand what they’re doing, but they don’t. They fear the power of certain symbols and attach themselves to the power of other “good” symbols. They’re hooked.

You could make a picture of a sun emanating three rays and call it Oobladee, and invent a whole mythology around it. You could claim it comes from Atlantis, or a secret society embedded in the old KGB, or an ancient Babylonian priesthood.

And then some people would react when they saw it. They would feel fear or anger or excitement.

It’s a con.

If you took this even further and created a whole set of symbols, dozens of them, and made up meanings for them, and worked with this game, you would eventually experience an interesting kind of liberation. You would see, to a greater extent, how arbitrary symbols are, how people trap themselves in “internal symbolic spaces.”

The whole point of frozen symbols is to enclose consciousness.

Let’s say you devised a picture of an eyeball hovering in a forest. A tear is dropping from the eye. The literal mind is looking for specific meaning. The literal mind wants an answer. It can’t find one.

The eyeball and the forest and the tear don’t add up. They provoke all sorts of associations, but no particular meaning, and the literal mind is frustrated.

So THEN you come along and assign a meaning. You say, “Well, this symbol was painted on masks in 834BC by the ancient Egyptian founders of a cult of pyramid builders. The eye and the tear stand for the tragedy caused by lack of faith in eternal life…”

And so forth and so on.

Now you’ve assigned specific meaning to the symbol. Now the literal mind breathes a sigh of relief. It has an answer. It can suck up that meaning and take it in and accept it. And now you can embellish the story and sell it to the literal mind. You can make that symbol into an object of fear and repulsion, if that’s the reaction you want to provoke in your audience, or you can make the symbol into an object of victory that stands for redemption.

You can twist and turn the symbol any way you want to.

The literal mind wants an answer to the mystery, a solution, and you provided it.

We’re talking about a very primitive form of art. When people operate at this level, buying symbols and their assigned meanings, it’s an indication they can’t appreciate or fathom more complex art.

They can’t read and fathom a novel or watch a stage play. That’s too much. There isn’t a clear one-to-one connecting pipeline between symbol and meaning, and so they’re confused. They’re frustrated.

I remember sitting in a movie theater watching a crime drama. The cops arrested the wrong man and framed him for a killing. A guy sitting next to me blew his top. He started telling his girl friend about how the cops were railroading this suspect and how bad the cops were, how the suspect was a victim of police brutality.

Well, yes. That was, in fact, the whole point of the movie. The movie was showing the audience how the police operated to create a false scenario and frame an innocent man. That’s what the movie was saying.

But this guy couldn’t get to that level. He thought the movie was actually on the cops’ side. He thought the movie was praising the arrest of the wrong man.

The literal mind at work.

In the same way, people accept the meanings that are assigned to symbols, and they react to those meanings in a reflex fashion.

In truth, symbols are open. They have no intrinsic meaning. People can inject any meaning they want to.

But when they’re trapped in a layer of symbolic thinking, they can’t see that. They’re determined to accept the already-assigned meaning and react to it.

Which is an invitation to propagandists.

Worse yet, it’s a fixation that artificially defines the limits of mind.

Symbols form a matrix-shell inside which minds live. Until they don’t.

In case you hadn’t noticed, lunatic school officials have been punishing students for symbols of guns. Pop tart chewed into the shape of a gun. Screen saver showing a picture of a gun. T-shirt with a message supporting the 2nd Amendment.

Then there are widening definitions of so-called hate speech. People want to ban the word “bossy.” They want to take any bland utterance and analyze it for possible “hate content.”

Among other things, this is puerile symbol-addiction.

A story about someone burning an American flag receives far more coverage and more reaction than a statement that the federal government violates the Constitution in a hundred ways.

Presidents are symbols. That is, the public reacts to the meanings broadly assigned to their images. The last time I looked, Americans in Kansas and Ohio weren’t sitting in the Oval Office having long conversations with Presidents.

Neither, I dare say, are Americans sitting down and talking with Satan. They’re reacting to meanings assigned to images of Satan painted by others.

Artists are in a unique position. They can make and unmake symbols at will. They can imbue symbols with meaning and then change the meanings or destroy the symbols. They don’t have to live under the dome of consensus symbols and their assigned meanings.

There are people who will argue that some symbols have “inherent meaning.” As if “the universe” sits around and writes down descriptions in a book, which is irrefutable.

Even if this were true, why do people have to accept those meanings?

Some symbols point to things that actually exist. Other symbols are fabricated with the intent of referring to fictions as if they were real. In both cases, the symbols are cooked and plumped up with meanings to impart a reaction.

I suppose God is the most widespread symbol on Earth. But instead of standing back and allowing the individual to decide what, if anything, it means to him, priest classes move in and organize religions to tell their stories, to embellish and codify the meaning of that symbol. And then to fight and kill to defend it.

Here is the symbol-maker’s proposition: “I’ll give you a symbol and tell you what it means and what it refers to. Then I want you to accept it, yes, but also to imbue it with feeling and awe and power. Give that power to the symbol. Make that investment. It’s your duty. Don’t vary or quibble.”

This is how humans are made into ciphers. This is mind control.

Jon Rappoport
Link to original article

The author of two explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED and EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at http://www.nomorefakenews.com

Consciousness, art, and psychiatry

Jon Rappoport connecting the dots … including the explosive ones like Dr. Frances, the lead psychiatrist author of the DSM-IV publicly admitting it’s all B.S. … and Dr. Russell Barkley, professor of psychiatry and neurology at U. Mass Medical Center admitting that ADHD (and by extension of his own logic — the entire field of psychiatry) is completely bogus. This is a long, richly formatted article but worth the read for anyone who’s ever wanted to create art and/or wondered if they’re “crazy.”

The Transformative Power of Art and Story

I first noticed this video posted somewhere a few weeks ago right before I began an afternoon of back-to-back sessions. Although I planned to watch it afterwards, life intervened with other things to do, and I eventually forgot about. Many thanks to Mitch for bringing this beautiful project back on my radar when I do have time to post it myself.

I love so many things about the Beehive Design Collective that I don’t even know where to begin. As Mitch says, “It’s faery approved,” and so it is — from the bees to the art to the stories to loving protection of the Earth from BigAg. It also demonstrates how we can work together without some top down corporate globalist enterprise forcing us to do so. When we as individuals choose to respect other individuals, to listen to them, to find common local ground, we can work so well together that no one needs to be the star. Each person’s talents reveal themselves, and each heart fuels whatever projects drive it. From local we can join together with other localities, creating organic, global action.

When such organic local action grows into global action through creative acts, a special power ignites, which completely engulfs and burns through the fascist, mechanistic, uniformity of forced globalization. When we carefully, lovingly infuse specific intentions into creative projects — whether art, song, story or food — that creative process amplifies those intentions into something more. The whole becomes far more than the sum of its parts. Magick builds and explodes from the pure intentions that demand such focused concentration in order to express themselves. This is sacred creation of the highest sort, and we can each find ways to offer our own creative skills and power to honor this Earth back into her natural state, and to respect each person, animal and element as an integral part of a larger Creation.

Showers of Blessings on their Kickstarter Campaign, which you can find and fund here.