Posts Tagged ‘Transition’

Cross Over, Cross Over, Cross Over

An old kundalini yoga video by Gurumukh (yes, I had it in VHS form, so that tells you something!), features a lot of exercises touching left fingers to right toes and vice versa, or alternately kicking the legs in the air so that they cross the middle line. I know from my days of visual therapy, that such “crossovers” help to balance the right and left sides of our brain. Whenever we make efforts to work both left and right, we encourage exponentially greater awareness.

If our right and left sides don’t balance, then things stop making sense, and the brain begins to shut down the visual field. We take in about 80% of our information about the world through our eyes. Even closed eyes help to regulate balance and tell us about the levels of light in our surroundings. If one eye tells a radically different story than the other eye, a situation called “binocular dysfunction” occurs, and it confuses the brain. Initially, we might get a headache or vertigo, but eventually the brain adapts, usually by shutting out as much confusing information as possible. “Just the facts, ma’am, just the facts, and never mind if they don’t make sense. We’ll just eliminate everything that doesn’t fit.”

This deletion of information that doesn’t “fit” happens physically, but it also happens metaphysically. Social psychologists call it “cognitive dissonance,” and would-be intuitives call it: “I would love to be intuitive, but my intuition’s bunk! I either get it totally wrong, or it’s just — blank.” In all of these cases, neglecting to activate, balance, and exercise both sides together results in major blind spots.

By contrast, repeatedly crossing over opens both intuition and logic, allowing both to flow more freely. Kundalini yoga practitioners reap huge benefits from the many crossover exercises and also from meditations in which the closed eyes roll slightly upwards and inwards, focusing towards the mysterious “Third Eye.” Whenever we awaken and stimulate the Third Eye, our powers of visualization, intuition, clairvoyance and manifestation increase. Synchronicities and synergies reveal themselves as Life in a state of harmony and creative flow. We learn to live in a world of paradox, because we no longer rely strictly on intuition or logic, left or right. Instead, we transcend duality — but not by ignoring it. No! We transcend duality by recognizing it and playing with it until it births something new.

Sometimes people wonder why someone who lives as intuitively and spiritually as I do bothers to dig around in the mucky muck of politics, the body, or the nitty gritty harshness of ignorance and poverty. Why don’t I just float “away with the faeries” as they say? Well, I can and I do quite often float away with the faeries, or bliss out in meditation, have late night giggle fests, and get embarrassingly excited about the silliest little things. But I am herenow — too. I didn’t bother to don this sometimes inconvenient physical form just so I could spend all my time checking out of it. Been there, done that. It’s fun. But it’s not why I’m here.

I have loads of reasons for being here, but one reason I feel strongly about involves modeling how to be “in this world but not of it.” We don’t transmute the world by shutting down our visual fields (on all levels) so that we can no longer see what’s “wrong” with it. Doing that can offer a valid spiritual path — one of cloistering or detachment — but that’s not my path. Again, been there, done that. Nor does total cloistering allow for the alchemy of transmutation. Zoning out through drugs, games and brainwashing offers another way of dealing with this unreal world, but again, not my path. I came here to help this planet transmute and thus transcend the rigid left/right, light/dark, high/low, fight/flight paradigms. We are creators, whether or not we choose to accept that challenge.

In the Thoth Tarot deck, the Princess of Disks is both the lowest of the low and the highest of the high. She’s so low, she’s high. Physical form, Shadow Work, the UnderWorld … all that nitty, gritty STUFF … forms the basis for our Creations.

Because we are Creators, whether we use 10% of our capacity or 100% of our capacity, the more “stuff” we allow into our Awareness, the more choices we have in how and what we can create. Just because we see it doesn’t mean we need to include it, but blanket deletion of “unpleasant” or “uncomfortable” things eliminates access to raw materials. Plus, how many of our most favorite, treasured things, people and ideas now, scared the bejeesus out of us when we first encountered them?

In creating with an eye towards transmutation and transcendence, I personally don’t want to ignore stuff. I want the opportunity to assess what I can do with it. Maybe nothing; but maybe I can make something really, really cool. Maybe I can combine this “ugly” thing with that “putrid” color and this “horrid, forbidden” thought and that “lowest of the low” will reveal itself as something beyond inspirational. I. Don’t. Know.

But I’m curious.

“Sometimes questions are more important than answers.” ~Nancy Willard

“The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. One cannot help but be in awe when he contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely to comprehend a little of this mystery every day. Never lose a holy curiosity.” ~Albert Einstein

Perhaps liberation doesn’t interest some people. It interests me. It engages me, and for those whom it also interests and engages, I offer the observation that crossing over — physically, in ideas, in experiences — crossing over, coupled with a timely turn inside, encourages transmutation and transcendence, which lead to liberation. That’s why I sometimes go on about this or that, and, more importantly: this-AND-that. In the spirit of crossing over, I’ll share an email that came through yesterday:

“you seem so busy, one hesitates to add one more thing, but I like your new initiative to dialogue with ‘the other side’ (i.e. people who don’t focus on fairies, or grow organic food, or vote Tea Party, or whatever). The video abt Common Core was very good. I knew of a Notre Dame faculty effort to block CC in Catholic schools, but not all the other efforts, except for the pro-big business effort to block it just because ‘it’s being imposed by those liberal elites’ (Indiana Legislature type thinking).

“but here’s my two cents – there is a movement in some traditional Catholic circles called ‘distributism,‘ which is for local control, local food, etc. It’s actually quite old – the writer GK Chesterton was a backer. It operates under the idea that private property ownership should be as widespread as possible, and a lot of other principles. But because ‘traditionalists’ and ‘New Agers’ tend to label each other, the two don’t always realize their common concerns. Distributists also support seed sovereignty and get why, etc etc. If you already know this, great, but just had to mention it. Time banks come to mind as solution for under/unemployed people – I live in a big ‘entitled’ community, partly because of the scarcity thinking of the leadership – both sides need to open up their thinking!”

And here … a link to an article on The Transition Network blog, “How to Discuss Transition with Conservatives/Republicans.” The article focuses on Transition Laguna Beach and how — unlike most Transition Towns — they aimed to include conservatives right from the start.

Whether you agree with the Transition article or the emailer’s comments, I urge you to consider not only their words, but also the spirit behind their words. It takes courage to try to build bridges where none or few exist. Sometimes we get the exact words or phrasing wrong, and it blows up in our faces. But we can learn from that goof instead of cowering inside our wounded egos.

We live on a beautiful planet overrun by a troubled and often highly destructive species (humanity) that nevertheless holds unfathomable potential to heal and to create new worlds. I’ve invested a lot in humanity and this planet, because I believe those investments can make a difference. I believe we can co-create something that both harmonizes with Nature and quantum leaps us to what today seems “supernatural.”

I’ll end with a quote from that same Gurumukh video (now available on DVD):

“We must start wherever we are. Because if you don’t start somewhere, you’ll be nowhere. … If you fall over, say, ‘So what?’ You get up and you try again. Who cares if it looks good? Start wherever you are and … KEEP GOING.”

Joanne Poyourow ~ Powerdown! Let’s Talk About It

Thanks, to Ann at exopermaculture.com for the post below, and for providing the space for an ongoing and lively discussion about Agenda 21 and Transition Towns, in the comments of her earlier post. (In case anyone wonders, I completely disagree with Foster Gamble’s assessment of Transition Towns, but you can read that among the many insightful comments from others on exopermaculture.com if you choose.)

Today’s post here expands upon some of my own discussion yesterday about honoring the sacred element of water. Are we summoning and requiring life to show us in vivid, undeniable detail why we need to do this? Or can we simply commit to taking action today (and tomorrow and the endless today’s that follow), because such action is simply the right thing to do — our responsibility not only to humanity, but also to the Earth and to the entire Web of Life?

I see this all the time in Medical Intuitive sessions in which I clearly see the looming mass of energy hovering around someone just prior to blasting them in the physical. David and I call it the difference between Trauma/Drama and Ease ‘n’ Please. In order to move beyond the Trauma/Drama we’ll need to take the same steps that we’d be taking in the Ease ‘n’ Please — the very steps our souls cry out to take. Same ends, but the means feel ever so different!

Which will it be? The writing has been on the wall, and it’s flashing in neon lights. With a full soundtrack blasting the message from loud speakers and sub woofers. Will we heed the call to Powerdown? In doing so, will we reconnect with and reclaim our True Power? One thing’s for certain, the fence is crumbling, sucked into one of those ever growing sinkholes on the surface of a gasping planet. What about you? Will you go the way of the devoured fence? Or will you make a difference? Will you help our planet heal, and in the process heal yourself?


Powerdown: Let’s talk about it

December 9, 2013

by Joanne Poyourow
Transition US via resilience.org

We’re caught in the squeeze right now.

Climate change is advancing at an incredible speed. We know we should do something, but we lack the political will to do what it takes to hold it to 2°C. UN committees are now being counseled to prepare for 4°C of warming. To keep it survivable, there’s got to be a powerdown — starting today.

Meanwhile green-tech enthusiasts cheer the rapid rate at which certain countries are installing renewable energy infrastructure. But reports are now surfacing of shortages in the rare earth ingredients needed to make that renewable infrastructure. We don’t have enough rare earth materials to replace the whole fossil infrastructure and continue on our current level of consumption. No one dares speak the little secret: Even with renewables, there’s got be a powerdown.

Shale oil is environmental desecration. But people are willing to consider it because there is potentially vast amounts of money in it because the easier-to-get-to oil is running out. Along with stopping fracking, there’s going to be a powerdown. But no one is talking about that part.

We should “keep the coal in the ground” scientists are telling us, and activists have (rightfully) picked up the cry. But no one never mentions the other side of the Stop Coal equation: the powerdown. We have to start talking about what we are willing to give up.

Industry charges forward: expand-expand-expand the airports, the freeways, heedless of the need for powerdown. New extractive drugs, new processed foods, new fashions and ways to consume, more-more-more energy consumption. And consumers and the market applaud it all. They’re inventing new biotech, new robotics, new high tech — all inextricably dependent on energy. Powerdown is such a big secret, that it can’t even be a talking point; it draws a blank stare.

But powerdown has got to happen. And really, really soon.

Powerdown means shifting to tools, techniques, lifestyle habits which use LESS power. It means reducing our energy consumption overall. Across the board. In totality.

Powerdown doesn’t mean convincing ourselves we’re going to convert our entire fleet of fossil automobiles over to an all-electric fleet, because about half of the fossil energy and greenhouse gasses embodied in each vehicle is spent in manufacturing it. Rather, powerdown means shifting to bicycles and human-powered transportation and reorienting our lives and our cities to need LESS transportation.

Powerdown doesn’t mean “more efficient” aircraft. Powerdown means no-fly pledges and stay-cations and moving closer to family. It means foregoing taking the kids abroad; and when your friends mention they’re thinking of doing so, it means responding in a way that makes it clear that it’s socially UNcool.

powerdown graphic

Powerdown doesn’t mean higher tech, because that requires vast high-powered labs and vast globalized supply chains and more-more-more rare earth materials behind the scenes to manufacture all that stuff. Stuff which will so quickly be outmoded.

Powerdown means inventing tools that run on zero energy, tools made from repurposed materials that humans already have extracted, tools that are durable and repairable because this isn’t a short-term fix. Rather, humanity is in this powerdown game for the long haul.

On a more intangible level, powerdown brings with it inevitable shifts in our economy. We can no longer have economic structures be dependent on more-more-more volume and more-more-more profits. Powerdown means a re-evaluation of what is important: Sufficiency. Basic needs met. Peace and harmony. (The biggest challenge is that last one.)

Powerdown means shifts in other systems too. It means parents and school officials becoming far less enchanted with the glossy hollow call of more-more-more high tech, and much more realistic about teaching the skills of powerdown. Right now we call it “green” to teach tiny kids to plant seeds in recycled plastic bottles, lessons that are completely disconnected from the reality of ecosystems, because it’s so cute. That’s much easier than making part of the high school curriculum the deep skills necessary to pump organic yield, like soil building, crop rotation, intensive urban ag spacing, season stretching, and food preservation. But we’ve got to do it.

Powerdown means our schools Just Saying No to corporate “donations” which strong-arm administrators and parents, and influence students, to place false hopes in the Big Corporate Way. It means teaching Local Foods and Buy Local, not as a “pretty-and-greener it-would-be-nice” feature, but as the core reality of our children’s future. Powerdown means shifting direction today.

Powerdown means political officials finding the backbone to turn away from big corporate dollars, to turn instead toward serious preparation for the realities of our future. Rather than trying to help disadvantaged communities climb on board old-fashioned energy-intense ways, powerdown means publicly and openly declaring that was a false mirage. Powerdown means acknowledging the folly and backing away from the cliff. It means helping all citizens make a direct shift into a more appropriate future.

Powerdown means faith communities embracing their role of cultivating peace and healing the world. It means preaching that large SUVs and use-it-once consumerism and large families are unholy, socially unjust, and sacrilegious. Faith communities can help us acknowledge that the false mirage wasn’t satisfying; that pursuit of it has made us less than who we are meant to be. Powerdown means Practice — as a community — of the lifestyle habits which lead to a peaceful shift: reusable dishes, onsite composting, food not lawns, bike/walk to gatherings, local food potlucks, simple living, connection.

It’s much easier to talk about shiny new stuff like the latest electric car model, or whether bullet trains are a good idea. It’s much easier to chat up the fantasy of high-rise hydroponic food towers, oblivious to their energy demands. But powerdown is here. Powerdown is now. We need to use the term widely.

It’s time to have the tough conversations. Time to get the wider public familiar with the concept. The writing is on the wall: Powerdown is inevitable. If we want any hope of achieving it peacefully, we’ve got to start shifting — minds and physical infrastructure — today. Powerdown: Say it. Begin it.