Posts Tagged ‘Magical Plants’

5DMediaNetwork ~ Telepathy and Plant Communication

I love it when the religion of Science finally begins to catch up with Intuitive Awareness and Ancient Wisdom. Quick question: if plants can do it, and fungi can do it, is it really so difficult to believe that humans and animals do, too? Is it really so impossible to believe that Nature Spirits communicate with humans?

Alice laughed: “There’s no use trying,” she said; “one can’t believe impossible things.” “I daresay you haven’t had much practice,” said the Queen. “When I was younger, I always did it for half an hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.” ~ Lewis Carroll from Alice in Wonderland

Thanks, Lucas!

CONTENT SHARE from VOXXI http://www.voxxi.com/telepathy-how-plants-communicate
Could telepathy be explained by how plants communicate? | June 26, 2013 by Silvia Casabianca

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(photo added by 5D Media Network & taken by correspondent Barbara Karnes)

Do plants communicate by using telepathy?

This interesting question was raised by recent research published in the Australian journal “BMC Ecology” suggesting that plants seem to react to slight noises — generated inside the cell — to talk with each other. And what does this mean for humans?

Those who believe in parapsychological phenomena, like telepathy between humans, haven’t been able to provide utter proof that the unconscious or conscious sending and receiving of mental and emotional signals called telepathy is actually possible — but even if it is, we don’t have a hint of what mechanisms would explain it.

Senior Scientist at The Institute of Noetic Sciences, Dean Radin, has suggested that quantum mechanics will provide an explanation of how telepathy works. Maybe delving deeper into the way other organisms communicate will also help us sort out the mystery of telepathy among humans.

Plants communicate through sound waves

sound-waves
Study found evidence to support plant communication through sound waves. (Photo Shutterstock)

A recent study found evidence to support the idea of plant communicate through sound waves. (Photo Shutterstock)[/caption]After observing how plants affect each other’s growth, Monica Gagliano and Michael Renton from the University of Western Australia proposed that plants communicate through sound waves (inaudible for humans) or nanomechanical oscillations, which are precisely within the realm of quantum mechanics.

Nanomechanical oscillations are vibrations on the tiniest atomic or molecular scale.

The researchers noticed that chili seeds (Capsicum annuum) grew better in a locked container in the presence of basil (Ocimum basilicum) but were hindered by the presence of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), suggesting that the growing environment had less effect on the development of the seeds than the way plants interacted with one another.

Gagliano and Renton said that “seed germination was positively enhanced by the presence of a ‘good’ neighbor, even when the known signaling modalities were blocked, indicating that light, touch or chemical signals may not be indispensible for different plant species to sense each other’s presence.”

Gagliano had already published findings last year of corn roots producing clicking sounds in the 220-Hertz range. The article appeared in “Trends in Plant Science.” She also found that, when suspended in water, corn roots tended to lean towards vibrations of the same frequency range.

Are we all interconnected?

Quantum mechanics teaches us that Earth is a sea of vibrations. Humans and animals respond to different frequencies. Even bacteria can signal one another with vibrations.

In 2011, researchers Allan Widom and colleagues from Northeastern University in Boston published findings showing that single-celled bacteria like E-Coli might communicate with each other by using radio waves. They calculated that the transition frequencies between these energy levels correspond to radio signals broadcast at 0.5, 1 and 1.5 kilohertz, same frequencies as those used in AM and FM radio transmissions.

Researchers have also discovered that bacteria can communicate by using a chemical language called “quorum sensing,” which allows them to act as a synchronized group.

The idea that plants communicate is not totally novel. In 1973, explorer Lyall Watson published “Supernature: A Natural History of the Supernatural,” where he suggested that, plants responded sympathetically when a live shrimp was thrown into boiling water.

People have been talking to plants for ages. Native Americans’ herbal medicine, for example, is based on some form of communication with plants. Bach flower remedies are also based on the capacity of a healer to communicate with the flowers and ask them to render their healing properties.

Discovery Channel’s MythBusters Tory Belleci, Kari Byron and Scottie Chapmen studied the effect of either praise or cruel insults on separate greenhouses while using another greenhouse as experimental control for two months. To their own surprise, the silent greenhouse produced lower biomass and smaller pea pods than the other two. Kind words or insults didn’t seem to make a difference, which seems to prove that it is sound the plants respond to.

Communication among plants mediated by light, chemicals

Studies suggest plants communicate. (Photo Shutterstock)

Plants can also react to light, and some use allelopathy to communicate with each other.

First used in 1937 by Austrian professor Hans Molisch, the term allelopathy describes a biological mechanism by which one organism produces chemical substances that influence the growth, survival and reproduction of another organism. Chemicals released into the soil or air by roots or leaves may alert other trees that it’s been eaten so that the others can speed up their production of chemical defenses. Allelopathy is found not only among plants, but also among bacteria and fungi.

Bielefeld University Professor Dr. Olaf Kruse and his team published, last year, in “Nature Communications” that green algae can draw energy from photosynthesis and from other plants.

If this type of communication through light, chemicals or sound waves cannot be called telepathy, then maybe it will still ignite the imagination of those who believe that we’re all connected in pretty much the same fashion as the planetary brain depicted in the “Avatar” movie. In Pandora, the conquered moon, there is a vast neural network through which the humanoids Na’vi and other beings can connect. You might remember seeing the image of interconnected plant roots rapidly exchanging information.

In planet Earth, as we now know, entire forests are indeed interconnected by networks of underground fungi (Mycorrhizae). Would it sound too off to imagine that plants might be using acoustic signals to transmit information through this web?

Psychologist and energy healer Dr. Olivia Bader-Lee thinks that the result of these experiments with plants will also confirm that humans can share some form of energy.

“The human organism is very much like a plant,” she said. “It draws needed energy to feed emotional states, and this can essentially energize cells or cause increases in cortisol and catabolize cells depending on the emotional trigger.”

Plants communicate with each other, studies find

Link to video

Silvia Casabianca is a Reiki Master, Medical QiGong practitioner & Holistic psychotherapist. She graduated as a Medical Doctor in 1972 and practiced Medicine in Colombia for 28 years. She is the author of “Regaining Body Wisdom: A Multidimensional Approach.”

http://www.5dmedianetwork.com/ link to original article

Sprouting, Growing, Blooming, Fruiting: My Garden in Photos

My garden claims that I did not give an accurate representation of it last time, because I focused too much on the work and not enough on the abundant growth. I’m making up for that insult today, in part by admitting that I not only talk to my plants and listen to them, but also … on demand … even sing to them. Oh, yes, they like that, and they like sharing their beauty with strangers. 🙂

Yesterday, we had some new friends over to our home and yard — some gardening and permaculture folks who helped us identify some of the volunteer plants we didn’t know whether to pull or celebrate. It turns out that my magical calling of plants continues! We now have a grape vine located in precisely the spot I asked it to appear, and a couple days ago, I noticed volunteer German chamomile had appeared the day after my request for more than my two starts from Whole Foods. We also have some kind of invasive rose species, so I need to tweak my asking and make it more specific. Oops! Not just any roses! I would please like “Wine and Roses” as well as “Faery Roses.” We’ll see how that goes.

I also had a funny indoor gardening experience the other night. I had been chanting to Krishna Das’ “Pilgrim Heart” when my ivy on a cherub pedestal suddenly requested that I sing to it. Well, request is a polite term. Ivy’s kind of assertive. It kept reaching out its tendrils and catching my flowy shirt until I finally sang a horridly off-key rendition of “The Holly and the Ivy,’ in honor of the fact that some holly trees apparently want to join the fun outside. Well! The ivy cutting in our downstairs bathroom, a cutting that has refused to grow roots for months, materialized some two inch long roots the very next day! Holly and ivy like to hang out together — masculine and feminine, the yin and the yang. I have my magick wand (“Freya’s Dawn,” who is made from a holly branch wrapped in silver cord with a prehnite tip) hidden in plain view on top of the bookcase/altar.

June 1 Ivy

Yesterday marked a day of immense gratitude for our yard in all its wild, unruly fertility. Not only did I serve our guests the Dandelion Goji Red Lentil Curry (dandelions and cilantro courtesy of our yard and garden), but I also spontaneously gathered ingredients for a wild and herb salad — lambsquarters, wild violets, watercress, oregano, chives, green onion, arugula, and sorrel — as well as a delicious after dinner mint tea made from lemon balm, peppermint and chocolate mint. Our friends totally “got” what I’ve been doing with the yard and were intrigued by all the wood mulch and various mad scientist gardener experiments. I swear the yard beamed with pride to hear all the admiration heaped upon it by new visitors. After this morning’s early rain, the yard and garden asked me to take photos. They’ve been so good about providing me with food and pretty delights that I’ve obliged. Here are today’s images:

June 1 Rhododendrons

Above you can see the rhododendron that bloomed on my birthday, just like all our rhododendrons did when I was a child growing up on Forrest Avenue! Indeed, this was the first plant I called to our home. I had wished for a rhododendron, and our landlord planted it in October right before we brought our first load here.

June 1 Sage

The photo doesn’t do this garden sage justice. This was the first plant I planted here, also in October, because it had outgrown its pot. We didn’t think it would survive the Winter, but this week it erupted in glorious purple blooms. Truth be told, the sage requested the photo presentation and all the rest of the plants just followed suit. 😉

First bloom of yarrow

First bloom of yarrow

Intentionally planted German chamomile in the herb garden

Intentionally planted German chamomile in the herb garden

Volunteer chamomile that answered my call the next morning

Volunteer chamomile that answered my call the next morning

Hyssop just starting to grow stronger

Hyssop just starting to grow stronger

Dwarf Jewel Nasturtium that fought its way through the mulch after I had given up on it

Dwarf Jewel Nasturtium that fought its way through the mulch after I had given up on it

Lemon Queen Sunflowers sprouted last night in the flower bed out front.

Lemon Queen Sunflowers sprouted last night in the flower bed out front.

Volunteer ferns (also requested) on the North side of the house

Volunteer ferns (also requested) on the North side of the house

Kale, parsley, Turkish rocket (a perennial), oregano, and Ruby Red Chard, zinnia and calendula sprouts in one of the InstaBeds.

Kale, parsley, Turkish rocket (a perennial), oregano, and Ruby Red Chard, zinnia and calendula sprouts in one of the InstaBeds.

Tree collards (another perennial), tomato, two kinds of basil, arugula and peppermint in another InstaBed (with compost bin in back)

Tree collards (another perennial), tomato, two kinds of basil, arugula and peppermint in another InstaBed (with compost bin in back)

Sea kale (another perennial) finally adapting to the raised bed setting

Sea kale (another perennial) finally adapting to the raised bed setting

Watercress and chives going gangbusters!

Watercress and chives going gangbusters!

Volunteer grape vine right behind the garden, perfect for trellising

Volunteer grape vine right behind the garden, perfect for trellising

Early Girl tomatoes already on the vine

Early Girl tomatoes already on the vine

The plants are much happier with this post, but if you want to see all the nearly backbreaking labor of love involved in taming this completely wild yard into something beautiful, productive and harmonious, you can click on “Mad Scientist Gardening” and “Yes, We Have a Cash Crop! And Other Blessings in Disguise.” Oh, those plants! They really do have character, preferences and not a little vanity. Blessings for your weekend … I’m off to procure some nettle plants from “Farmer Jon.” 😉