Posts Tagged ‘Leprechauns’

Fairies in the News

It always warms my heart when mainstream media redeems itself by reporting on the Fae. Indeed, both The Guardian and the BBC have given real coverage to a high controversy in Wayford Woods:

“Trustees say cherished elfin estate of up to 200 front doors, in Wayford woods, Crewkerne, is gobbling up too many tree trunks – and the spritely speculation must be hobbled.”

No, this is not a spoof but an actual debate about the pro’s and con’s of limiting the over-development of an elfin forest. Living in a home in which we are fast approaching the manifest destiny of portal doors, I completely understand the dilemma. After my next door arrives on March 28th, I really will need to make some adjustments, perhaps switching only to canvases lining our stairwell, since, alas, too many faery doors really can overwhelm a space! You can read two delightful, yet serious viewpoints on the doors of Wayford Woods by clicking the following titles, both from the Guardian:

Fairies’ woodland homes face planning control

Don’t do away with the fairies: we need to relearn our sense of the magical

Meanwhile, a bit closer to home, I have this faery news to report:

It’s official. Leprechauns are terrific cobblers. I mail ordered a pair of boots that arrived in January, but much to my disappointment, they were so uncomfortable on my left foot that I could barely walk for days after wearing them only a few minutes. I loved the boots (very faery and, in theory, great for snowy woods walks), but I just couldn’t wear them long enough to break them in. I tried multiple shoe inserts — gel, foam, arch support, ball support — yet the pain remained. Determined to keep these boots, I asked the faeries for help. They told me to ask a leprechaun for help, because “leprechauns are good cobblers.” I hadn’t heard this before, but upon research discovered that, yes, indeed, leprechauns have a reputation for fixing shoes! They also like to make deals (this I already knew).

True story here: a leprechaun appeared and offered to fix my boots — for a price. I asked the price, and it was an airline bottle of Irish Whiskey and seven quartz crystals. I had the crystals and left them outside, but I needed to procure some whiskey. Hey, I was desperate! David and I ran some errands in Mishawaka, and I explained my dilemma to him just as we happened to drive by a liquor store. He humored me, and we asked the clerk if he had any airline sized bottles of Irish Whiskey.

“Is Jameson alright?” he asked.

“I don’t know,” I said, looking at David. “Is Jamison ‘Irish Whiskey’?” at which point David nodded, then winked at the clerk and announced, “She’s buying it for a leprechaun!”

The clerk cracked up, and so did David, but for different reasons — the clerk because he thought it was a joke; David because he knew it wasn’t.

I got carded buying Jameson for a leprechaun!

When we got home, I placed the bottle between my boots, and the magical cobbler indicated it would take two nights. I had already placed the seven crystals outside. I left my boots alone for three nights, just in case, and I put a coin under the whiskey bottle as a tip. In all honesty, I must report that when I tried the boots on again, they no longer hurt my foot. In fact, they felt springy, and I wear them all around town now. They were fabulous for frolicking in huge snow drifts, and they make wearing skirts fun even on cold, windy days. I don’t know what the leprechaun did, but I would have to endorse his skill. In the event you ever fall in love with a pair of shoes that you simply cannot comfortably wear, you might want to inquire after leprechaun services. These boots feel extra magical now, like they squirt out pixie dust wherever I walk, and truly, I tell you, nothing else worked.

Leprechaun cobbled boots

Leprechaun cobbled boots

For My Irish Friends and Faerie Lovers

May Leprechauns bless your shoes and purse,
May the Fae shine laughter and joy among you,
May the Love in your heart break every curse,
Let the Isle of √Čire dance inside you!

Over the Rainbow

While unearthing an external harddrive, I stumbled upon my fifth grade journal. The bubbly cursive encouraged me to toss it aside, but after several synchronous openings — like pow between the eyes synchronicities — I decided to give it further perusal.

As part of “Simple Abundance,” Sarah Ban Breathnach encourages women to find a picture of themselves at age 10, because she feels this is the age at which women tend to begin losing themselves. I was a tomboy at 10, complete with Laura Ingalls Wilder braids, brown, sun-kissed skin and mildly buck teeth. I wore knees socks. (OK, I still do, but at 10 I even wore them with shorts!) When I went through Simple Abundance in 1997, I found a perfect photo of myself walking on stilts while wearing pink shorts, white kneesocks and very long braids. My face looks down in joyful concentration. I think my dad took the photo right before I started laughing so hard I fell of the stilts. Yep, some things haven’t changed!

Or rather, they have. But they’ve cycled back as I’ve allowed more joy and play into my life. I was startled to find some things I thought I had recently rediscovered from high school, except apparently in high school I had been rediscovering my fifth grade self. In addition to an orobourus of LOVE and a frog king (those of you who’ve read Schizandra and the Gates of Mu will know the significance of this), I also found evidence of studying codes and symbols and portals. There are short stories, including one about a “Backwards Dog” who has brain injuries, and another called, “Over the Rainbow.” Um, If I Only Had a Brain Injury? Sometimes I feel like my life is the orobourus of LOVE!

In any case, I thought I’d share Over the Rainbow:

The day had been a sunny one, until all of a sudden the rain had come pouring down. The odd thing about it was not that the rain had come on so suddenly, but that the sun had not stopped shining.

Martha, a child considered odd by her many brothers and sisters, was outside during this strange occurence. The girl looked up and saw a beautiful rainbow. She had heard of there being gold at the end of rainbows but its beauty satisfied her.

The rainbow lasted for days. Martha sat entranced by its glowing colors.

One day Oscar, Martha’s eldest brother looked up from his video game and saw the rainbow. He too had heard of gold being at the end of a rainbow. He packed up his knapsack and got a large bag. Unfortunately, the other children wanted to know what their brother was up to. At first, Oscar was reluctant to tell him where he was going, but soon the children forced him to tell them.

All the children wanted to go with him. That is almost all. Martha didn’t hold with her brother’s greedy ideas. She wanted to sit and watch as birds flew across the rainbow. Then she thought of Leprechauns. How nice it would be to have one as a friend! She packed up her knapsacks and said good-bye to her bewildered parents. Then, she set off.

Now I’ll bet you are wondering what happened to her brothers and sisters. The brothers and sisters set off with flying imaginations of gold and the beautiful things they could buy with it. The children traveled for months without success. Martha, however, found a Leprechaun right away. They two became great friends. The Leprechaun introduced Martha to the other Leprechauns. They liked her so much that they asked her to stay and live with them. Martha gratefully accepted.

She stayed with the Leprechauns for the rest of her long life.

As for her brothers and sisters, as far as we know, they are still searching for their gold. Their greed has taken them no place but over the rainbow and into the clouds.