Posts Tagged ‘Law of Attraction’

Precognitive Blues, Part 2: Guilt, Law of Attraction, and Meanings that Change Over Time

“Man needs reckless courage to descend into the abyss of himself.” ~ William Butler Yeats

This is Part 2, in what feels like a three part series. If you’ve not read “Precognitive Blues, Part 1: Dreams, Warnings and Blessings,” you can do so here. Today’s post deals with some of the other biggies that complicate precognition. According to “The Mystica“:

  • Precognition is the direct knowledge or perception of the future, obtained through extrasensory means. Precognition is the most frequently reported of all extrasensory perception experiences, occurring most often (60 percent to 70 percent) in dreams seeing the future.
  • It may also occur spontaneously in waking visions, auditory hallucinations, flashing thoughts entering the mind, and the sense of “knowing.” Precognitive knowledge also may be induced through trancechanneling, mediumship, and divination.

Because I’ve lived with “future memories,” psychic dreams, Cosmic Heads Up, and premonitions for my entire life, I’m no stranger to the challenges of precognition. I also coach and do readings for many highly intuitive clients, so these topics arise in sessions, too. This blog series attempts to provide a map or guideposts for what often feels like strange new territory.

Dealing with Precognitive Guilt

Tied with Precognitive Anxiety, aka pre-TSD, Precognitive Guilt weighs in as one of the biggest emotional challenges of seeing, sensing or dreaming future events. This guilt comes in a variety of forms. I’ll share some personal examples to illustrate. Continue reading

Incremental and Lasting Change: Create New Systems and Safety Nets Before Summoning Destruction

Today’s post is actually a comment I left when Ines, the writer of the blog post “Starving the War Machine ~ Let’s Try This Again,” privately emailed me to challenge me to advise people to crash the financial system en masse. Her post throws down the gauntlet to “Hundreds and thousands of people in the Alternative Media and the great researchers, truthseekers, wanna be gurus and Cult leaders that come from all walks of life [and] pride themselves for the knowledge/information/intel they acquired” who continue to operate in the financial system. Apparently, one of my readers, Anthony, suggested in the comments section that Ines contact me, which she did. You can read her post by clicking through the above link. Here are my own thoughts on her ideas:

Thank you for emailing me Ines, and Anthony, thanks for the suggestion. While I personally spent many, many years starving the war machine and then later trying to get our community set up so that it could survive the kind of financial chaos Ines is championing, I have found that a) most people are not interested in self-sufficiency or even resilience; b) this sort of widespread chaos is exactly what the PTB are hoping for; and c) it takes money to get things in place as a safety net.

This is not an excuse. I have poured thousands of dollars into rehabbing land and creating a food forest, which I’m turning over to 5 other people when we move. I also use these gardens to make bumper crop food donations to local food banks, feed neighbors, friends and impoverished people I encounter. I address the issues in the most practical ways I find, which includes doing my best to get local communities to do what you, Ines, and I and others are personally doing: taking responsibility for ourselves, growing our own foods, using plants to heal, focusing on energetic as well as community resilience.

In America, we are nowhere near the level of resilience where I could in good conscience recommend people try to crash the financial system in a week. Right now there are not enough safety nets in place. We are moving to a city that has many more of these nets in place — several public food forests, many, many community gardens, an ethic of “Community Capitalism,” where those who do have money voluntarily funnel it back into local projects that support people and the earth. I forget where you live Continue reading

How to Thrive in a Less Than Ideal Location

Today’s topic arises so many times in coaching sessions that I thought I’d address it here, since it seems more common than not for people to feel misplaced, isolated or otherwise “stuck” in a location other than their heart’s desire. Having lived in 43 homes throughout my life — including many of the most beautiful, stunning spots in the US — and currently living well in a way less than ideal area, I can share both personal and professional tips for creating your best life wherever you are. This is not a “settle for less” post, but rather a list of ways to ensure you receive the most benefit, growth and satisfaction from any given location until you either realize you do love where you live, or you manage to leverage yourself into something much more compatible and preferred.

Create a Sacred Space

The first, easiest and most important step you need to do is to reclaim your environment by creating a sacred space. Sacred means “made or declared holy” and includes the idea of “set apart.” Even if you live in a hovel with Messy McMess, find a corner, mantle, bathroom, nightstand, chair, closet, or room that you can clean, clear, decorate and dedicate to you. Size doesn’t matter. Even a corner of a bookshelf, consciously cleaned and intentionally claimed begins the sympathetic magic process of exerting more of your own energy over an incompatible location.

Once you choose a spot, you’ll attract opportunities to charm and enhance other areas. Instead of feeling oppressed by your environment, your field of influence grows and transmutes your surroundings. “As Within, So Without” very often begins with one tiny external shift.

fullsizerender

Above, you can see an Element Altar, hidden in plain view, right in the center of our home. This little spot has featured different objects over the years, but I created it from Day One in order to honor the Elements — Earth, Air, Fire, and Water — in our home, celebrating and respecting Nature front and center in a region of the country that defiantly does not.

I’m an artist, so I know the power of color and symbols to shape space (and reality). Continue reading

Wasp Wisdom

I sent this email to a client yesterday, but it occurred to me that the message could apply for a lot of people, so I’m sharing it here. The email subject line was “also, forgot to tell you this,” and it followed a session in which I learned she had been bitten by an ant while trying to connect with Nature for her healing:

Remember the time before last time, you mentioned wasps having no good purpose, and I was like, “Wasps are awesome! They have female warrior energy, they eat bad bugs, they provide protection for your garden, etc.?” Well, I had the day prior mentioned on my blog, “Wasps welcome,” and immediately after hanging up the phone with you, I happened to glance out at our garage, where some wasps were busy building a nest, right by our garage door. I thought, hmmm, this is not a very good location for a big wasp nest, but I felt like I couldn’t kick them out given the recent invitation and synchronicity of our conversation.

Soooo, I thanked them for hearing the invitation, but then opened and closed the garage door a few times, sending them the message, “Just so you know, this is what this location will involve. If you’re ok with the noise and disruption, you’re welcome to stay, but we will, occasionally need to get in and out of here, especially later in the gardening season when I need my wheelbarrow on a daily basis.” They stayed for awhile, and you could see them conversing.

The next day, they had abandoned the partially made hive. I haven’t found the location anywhere else, but it is likely somewhere close. Anyway, I share that as an illustration that we can attract what we want and then tweak that attraction once it begins to form in reality. It doesn’t need to be a huge rejection or a huge drama. It can just be an “Are you sure? … because here are the implications of this manifestation in this particular way…”

Wasp wisdom is very cool stuff:

Wasp/Hornet/Yellowjacket’s Wisdom Includes:

Use of female warrior energy
Sisterhood
Understanding female societies
Communal living

From http://animalspirits.com, which, FYI, is a great site for interpreting unusual animal sightings or dreams. Ant wisdom is on the same page:

Ant’s Wisdom Includes:

Patience
Stamina
Planning
Energy and patience needed to complete work
Communal living
Storing for the future

(Note the patience!) 😉

Anyway, thought you’d find those interesting …
Blessings and healing on ALL levels,
Laura

What Are You Learning?

We live in the so-called “Information Age.” What kind of information are you imbibing? Do you watch the outsized, overblown mythology and status-quo (or worse) brainwashing ironically called “the news”? Or do you devour alternative media’s infinite listings of all the ways our world is going and has already gone to hell in the proverbial hand basket? Do you “forget all that stuff” and turn on your favorite TV programming “to numb out”? Or do work and childcare fill your days and nights so fast that you find little time for learning anything at all? Even so, we’re in the Information Age. Information bombards us everywhere we turn. The question remains: “What are you learning?”

Because we have agency over what goes into that noggin of ours.

Yes, certain things demand more of our time and attention than others, but we can still squeeze in some positive, practical and joyful tidbits here and there. Passion exponentially amplifies whatever information we glean, making even small time investments pay bigger learning dividends.

Try to learn five new things every day: little factoids, practical tips, new techniques, a new piece of music, a chant, how to cure an ingrown toenail, how to write (and think) in active voice, or acquiring any old-fashioned but largely forgotten skills. Topic or field doesn’t matter. The only requirement is that the information interests you.

Also consider the ways you acquire information. In this age of zippity doo dah texts, emails, web phones, wifi laundromats, satellite this and LinkedIn that … do you ever … unplug? When was the last time you read an actual, physical book? It’s a different experience than a Kindle — having words on a page go directly to brain rather than projected and received through yet another screen. When was the last time you walked outside and observed Nature? Smelled a rose? Picked your own tomato — either from a garden or a Farmer’s Market table brimful of ugly yet delectable heirlooms? Do you even know what “heirloom” means with regard to food? When was the last time you cut your own hair or made your own lasagna? Have you built anything since Legoland? What about music? Or stories? Do you know any poetry by heart? How often do you visit your local library? Have you ever taken a dance class? Or tried your hand at watercolors?

In the “Information Age,” how quickly most people dismiss any information that comes through the body — through doing instead of watching YouTube videos. How quickly our society dismisses beauty as a luxury, healthy food as a weird obsession, trade skills as “blue collar,” and self-sufficiency as a bizarre, “Doomsday Prepper” lifestyle.

Ummmm, until the Industrial Revolution gave us ugly factories, crowded cities, pollution, toxic pharmaceutical drugs, GMO’s, couch potato desk jobs, and instant everything, beauty, real food, tangible skills, and self-sufficiency were just … Life!

What kind of information do you consume on a daily basis? What kind of things would you prefer to learn and experience? “No time” usually just means you haven’t gotten creative enough with how you use the time available. Listen to books on tape or CD in the car or while working out at the gym. Chant while making dinner. Paint during a few of the hours you would have frittered away on Facebook or in front of the tell-LIE-vision. Plant a handful of seeds and just nurture them to maturity, even if it’s just a basil plant in your Southern window. You’ll learn something. I guarantee it.

We can — as a society and as individuals — reclaim the “Information Age.” Learn what we want to learn. Become the change we wish to see in the world:

“Get over the idea that only children should spend their time in study. Be a student so long as you still have something to learn, and this will mean all your life.” ~Henry L. Doherty

“It is important that students bring a certain ragamuffin, barefoot irreverence to their studies; they are not here to worship what is known, but to question it.” ~Jacob Bronowski

“The most useful piece of learning for the uses of life is to unlearn what is untrue.” ~Antisthenes

“The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.” ~Alvin Toffler

“I find four great classes of students: The dumb who stay dumb. The dumb who become wise. The wise who go dumb. The wise who remain wise.” ~Martin H. Fischer

Company

David sent this to me this morning, and all I can say is, “Why yes, I do!” 😉

Happy Magic

Manifesting Plants for Your Garden or Food Forest

I write a lot about gardening and a lot about manifestation, but not too often do I combine both topics into one post. Today, my back, David, and my friends have all banded together to tell me to take a BREAK from the yard work! Reluctantly, I’m listening. I’ve spent much of this morning daydreaming on the BioMat, have a light load of sessions this afternoon, and then I get to harvest some of the fruits of my daydreaming.

Yep! Daydreaming brings results. 🙂

In light of our overabundance of dandelions — the harvesting of which is one of the reasons for my lower back needing a break — I decided to “call in” some other aggressive plants. Mints, wildflowers, nettles, chamomile … I’ll let them all duke it out with the current weedy residents for more biodiversity. I have several successful ways of calling in plants, so I thought I’d share some of the easiest methods here.

1) Talk about your garden and enthusiasm for growing food. To strangers, to friends, to relatives. One person’s weed is another’s harvest, and I’ve had friends offer me raspberry and blackberry canes, elder trees, thyme and lemon balm, just because I happened to mention these in conversation.

2) Post on Freecycle.org. I put a list of “troublesome” plants I’m courting, such as echinacea, yarrow and various mints. I specifically asked if anyone needed to thin theirs, since medicinal herbs can outgrow their welcome. Sure enough, I’ve had people respond with offers of chocolate mint, spearmint, yarrow, hyssop, echinacea and more, all free for the taking. I’m cheating on my gardening break today to walk five blocks to pick up a whole bunch of starts from our neighborhood plant lady. This turns out to be the same wonderful woman who gifted me indoor houseplants last winter, including ivy, African violet, and jade, to go along with some other donations of spider plants. All free. All helpful to the ones giving, since they needed to prune or otherwise thin their growth.

3) Tune in to the plant spirits and ask them to join you. I actually do this prior to taking any other tangible action. Sometimes you don’t even need to involve other people. Recently, I tuned in to chickweed, because I love it. Even though it had come out over a month ago at the Farmer’s Market, it suddenly appeared yesterday on the shady side of our yard. I’ve had similar luck with other plants like purslane, tulips, daffodils and ferns either spontaneously growing on our property or bringing some person to me as their intermediary.

4) These same methods work for other garden supplies and bugs, too. I’ll be picking up two giant tomato cages later this week, because they’re just taking up room in someone’s basement. Last year, I manifested three tomato cages in Madison, releasing them from another person tired of tripping over them in her garage. I’ve already seen numerous ladybugs here for aphid patrol, and last year, I made friends with some wasps who carefully protected my plants from harmful bugs as well as a careless neighbor who had previously mowed over my elder tree. Those wasps sent him on his way, pronto, and he gave my garden a wide berth! They never stung me, though.

5) Replant your groceries. I’ve done this with celery, green onions and garlic, but, apparently, people have had success with all sorts of things, including parsnips for growing parsley (and parsnips), potatoes, Romaine lettuce and more.

6) Save seeds from organic produce you consume. This one’s less reliable because if your food comes from a hybrid plant (still grown organically), then you might wind up with something very different than you expect. Still, surprises can delight and inspire.

7) Keep your eyes and ears peeled for plant swaps. We had one here in Goshen on May 4, but I didn’t have anything to offer besides dandelions and wild violets, which most people already have. One peramculture farm in Australia recently hosted a plant swap and had over 300 attendees! You never know what you’ll score when you encounter a creative group of plant lovers.