Posts Tagged ‘Insects’

Moths and Healing

We really can learn a lot from bugs!  Consider the lowly moth.  Usually not so glorious in color as its better loved cousin the butterfly, moths nonetheless can teach brilliantly about light and truth. 

“Like a moth to the flame,” we say to describe seemingly uncontrollable actions in the name of love or desire.  The expression often carries with it a sense of pathos.  Poor moth, unable to resist the fire that would destroy it!  And yet, there’s something admirable in that kind of one-pointed devotion to the light.  It reminds us of the potential we all have for true healing through love and Oneness. 

Shortly after we moved to Las Vegas, New Mexico, in 2002, we learned that in May and June, moths overrun the entire town.  Screens and adobe walls do little to deter these shiny grey intruders, and every morning meant awakening to glitter on our pillows.  And sheets. And floors.  And windows.  Moths, pressed against our screens!  Moths on the counters.  Antennae and wings streaked across our bathroom floor from accidental nightime tramplings.

Still recovering from a brain injury,  I found the whole scene maddening.  They flitted in my peripheral vision, teasing eyes that preferred to shut out a world which no longer made much sense.  Anything that moved or flickered bothered me in ways a healhty person cannot fathom.  It felt like pieces of my soul were tickling me with stinging nettle.  My neck would spasm as my eyes twitched, trying to interpret a fluttering world.  I’d grow dizzy and the room would spin.  If my surroundings did not stay completely static, then I felt sick.  All change was bad change, and I had literally developed tunnel vision as a way to cope.

Night after night, I sat at my little writer’s desk, tense with the prospect of grey moths dive bombing my face.  It’s not like I could write for more than 15 minutes anyway!  My eyes would pulse into a migraine after a short time of visual stimulation.  I resented these moths for taking my preciously small amount of visual attention and wasting it!  I wanted them OUT of our house, but every evening more and more appeared. 

Killing them, even if I’d wanted to, meant a gruesome, sticky mess, and so I became obsessed with catching them.  My first night of moth hunting, I only captured a single moth, and it took me three hours to do so.  I chased dozens of moths around the house holding a glass in one hand and a postcard in the other, determined to trap and release.  They made a game of it, lighting on the wall just long enough for me to aim, but not long enough to pounce.  My impaired brain and visual function definitely left me at a disadvantage.  Through tears, I swore the moths were mocking me.

Finally, after hours of missed opportunities, I managed to land a glass on the wall above a moth.  I carefully slid the postcard under the lip and triumphantly showed my now-husband. 

“What are you going to do with it?” he asked, somewhat bemused. 

“Put it outside,” I exclaimed, throwing open the door, at which time ten more moths enterred our home.  I fought and lost the battle with tears of frustration.

“That’s enough for tonight,” said Stephen, giving me a hug.  “You need to rest up for tomorrow.”

Practically sulking, I went to bed and had an exceptionally good night’s sleep.  I awoke the next morning to the usual glitter and wings, but somehow I felt a little more relaxed.  … Until that evening, when the moths began their nightly blitzkrieg.  This time I developed a strategy.  I would follow one or two around the entire house, wearing them down so that they couldn’t dart away from me at the last moment.  

The moths moved fast around my head, reminding me of Wolfe Pursuits–an exercise from my old days of vision therapy.  Three times a week, I had needed to go to the behavioral optometrist’s office, wear prism glasses and follow two curved handles with little silver balls on the end, expertly guided by trained vision therapists.  The goal was to line up the silver balls without shifting my eyes from their smooth flowing motions.  While doing this, I had to concentrate on the entire room as well, because my doctor would sneak up on me to ask, “What color shirt is Willy wearing today?  Who’s behind you?  How far to your right is this chair?” If I turned my head, I had to start over.  

These moths zoomed in front of my face like the silver balls, leaving tracers in their wake.  “This is trippy,” I told Stephen, who continued to look bemused.  That night, I could have caught both moths, but I had forgotten the glasses in the kitchen!  This strategy required more planning than I’d anticipated (no surprise since my sequential reasoning remained severely impaired). 

I was about to quit, but Stephen said, “You give up too easily.”  Well, that made me mad!  Damn moths, I muttered below my breath.  Making me chase you around the whole damn house.  Fluttering around my face.  Ha!  I snagged one on the curtain and quickly realized I had forgotten the postcards.  “Can you please bring me an envelope?” I asked.  Stephen did. 

Once I captured moth number 1, Stephen asked, “What are you going to do with it?” 

“Put it in the kitchen until tomorrow morning,” I said, recalling what had happened the night before.  I actually felt proud of myself for that forethought!  “And now I’m going to catch one more before I go to bed.”  Armed with a glass and postcard, I managed to trap moth number 2 much faster.  I set the second glass by the first and went to bed, feeling the sweet exhaustion of a well exercised body and brain.  In the morning, I released the moths outside, remembering to close the screen door so they would not immediately reenter our house.

This process continued each night for weeks, until I got so good at catching and releasing moths that I ran out of glasses, mugs and cups.  In the morning, our whole walkway would be lined with every container from our kitchen as I ritualistically removed the paper lids and let the creatures go.  “Wow,” said Stephen, “You’ve really gotten good at this.”

“Yep,” I agreed, smiling.  I also felt good.  Due to finances, I had had to quit visual therapy before healing all the way.  Chasing moths reintegrated my vision and brain with surprisingly similar methods.  No, I didn’t have prism glasses, but I did learn to follow moving objects with my eyes instead of my head while paying attention to the entire room. My horribly dimished peripheral field re-opened because I needed it to catch the moths.  (They were tricky!)  My sequential reasoning improved as I spent hours trying to outsmart these furry little insects, and my balance returned by practicing launches and then steadying myself until I could slide a postcard over the glass.

By the time I realized what was happening, moth season ended, but my healing had already solidified.  “Is that why you wouldn’t ever help me catch them?” I demanded.  Stephen just smiled.  To this day, I thank those moths for giving me the discipline and freedom to pursue the treatment I so desperately needed at the time.  And I thank Stephen for his smiles.  He always has liked bugs!

Ant Control: Compassionate Ways of Dealing with Ants

So, you’ve decided to walk more lightly on the Earth.  You buy organic fruits and vegetables.  You’ve rid your home of toxic cleaning products.  Heck, maybe you even drive a hybrid!  Some of you gradually went vegetarian or vegan, and now it really bothers you to think of killing anything.

Except ants! 

What happens when they invade your pristine eco-home?  What happens when you don’t want to kill them, but you also want to avoid “protecting” your home with poisonous pesticides?  I’ve faced this very same dilemma, especially when moving to properties left vacant for awhile.  Through experimentation, animal communication and sheer luck, I’ve discovered a few helpful hints:

What Doesn’t Work

When my now-husband lived on Vashon Island near Seattle, he got one of those sonic “rat deterrants.”  Practically everyone on that island has rats, and we didn’t want to kill them.  This plug-in device would supposedly encourage them to live elsewhere because the sound interrupted their enjoyment of our inner walls.  It worked great … for getting rid of rats.  Unfortunately, the sound or electrical current also drove all the carpenter ants out of the walls and into his kitchen and living room!

These were no ordinary ants, either.  They knew how to camouflage themselves, lining up along carpet patterns and linoleum seams.  They could mimic shadows and create their own tile designs.  I still had remnants of my brain injury and chasing those little guys around was somewhat maddening.  I didn’t want to kill them, but even if I had, they were big ants, with thick segments- – not exactly easy to squash. 

We looked online for non-toxic, compassionate ways to deter ants.  Several sites suggested spraying a mixture of lavender and peppermint essential oils in water.  I did this religiously, all over his counters, along cracks in the floors, over door thresholds.  Imagine my horror when the next morning I found not just six or seven aunts creeping along the counters and floors, but dozens to hundreds of black, crunchy beasties eagerly gobbling up their repellant.  They loved  it! 

Peppermint and lavender do NOT repel ants.  I have tried this on numerous occasions, always with the same result.  Adding peppermint and lavender to countertops invites ants to have a party, not depart.

Eventually, my husband and I decided to go the “old fashioned route” of sending telepathic messages to the ants to leave.  It took a great deal of concentration to get the attention of so many of them, and we temporarily needed to unplug our rat repellant.  Eventually, the queen revealed herself and we “relocated” her to a giant woodpile.  The ants followed their leader.  Anytime I used peppermint or lavender, though, a few of them wandered back in for a sniff!

What attracts ants

Most people know not to leave food particles around, lest ants invade the kitchen, but some things attract them more than others:

sugar

coconut oil

peppermint

lavender

water

Yes, water.  Many times when ants invade your home, they seek water rather than food.  I have occasionally seen ants crawling all over my Brita trying to find the entrance to its little reservoir.  Even if I have crumbs messing up the counter, these ants don’t care about the food; it’s liquid they want. 

Ants are also highly sensitive to energy vibrations.  When we lived at Lake Tahoe, we had no ant problem except during my daily yoga routine.  The moment I unfurled my mat and put on a yoga DVD, these large, high desert ants marched out to join me.  They surrounded me like my own miniature class, and no, I’m not making this up!  When I finished practicing yoga, they would retreat until the following afternoon’s asanas.  I even noticed that they liked some DVD’s better than others.  Yoga for Beauty seemed like a particular favorite, judging by their numbers.  It felt a bit difficult to do my pranayama (breathing) and suvasana (corpse pose) with all those ants around me, but they never bit me.  Apparently, they just liked the yoga vibe. 

Ants often appear when your money luck is changing.  Perhaps because they work so hard, or because they can carry ten to twenty times their body weight, or maybe because there are just so darned many of them, ants often represent abundance.  If your intuition tells you that your financial struggles will soon end, consider ants a friendly acknowledgment from the universe.

If, on the other hand, you have felt precarious in your good fortune and feel like it could crumble beneath you, pay attention to the behavior of your ants.  Do they just hang around in small numbers like little reminders, or do you see them invading you in droves?  Have they stung you?  Are they eating your foundation (literally)?  These sorts of encounters often serve as warnings.  Check your finances and investments.  The ants might actually save you a great deal of stress.

How to get them to leave

In the event that ants have arrived to give you a message, the sooner you receive that message, the sooner they can move on to someplace else.  Consider some of the qualities of ants and ask yourself how those might relate to current questions or concerns in your life. 

If you just want them to leave and really don’t care about their message, then concentrate on the following word-image, “This is not a safe place for you.”  Hold that feeling and then imagine the slaughter of ants that would occur if you still used Raid.  “This is not a safe place for you.  This is not the right location for your home.  Thank you for visiting, but this is not a safe place for you.  I don’t want to kill you, but if you stay, you will leave me no choice.  This is not a safe place for you.” 

If you do kill some of the ants, make sure you continue holding these thoughts strongly and repeatedly in your mind as you do so.  Eventually, the ant scouts will carry away the dead ants and bring “word” to their queen and the other worker ants to go somewhere else.  If you hold these thoughts strongly in your mind, you will need to kill far fewer of them before they understand your boundaries.

 

 

Laura Bruno is a Life Coach, Animal Communicator, Medical Intuitive and Reiki Master Teacher. In addition to private coaching and intuitive sessions, she teaches Conscious Eating 101 classes, Intuition workshops and Reiki Certification classes around the US. For more information on classes, animal communication, raw food coaching, transitional coaching, and letting your gifts shine through your career, please see: http://www.internationalrenaissancecoaching.com or call 775-750-9140.