Posts Tagged ‘Fairy Tales’

Garden Update: Misty Morn, Faery Godmother, Cat Familiar, and Osage Orange

I’ve been in hermit mode here — doing intuitive sessions, taking walks, exercising, cooking myself on the BioMat and completing an astonishing breadth and depth of studies before I shift my focus to fiction writing on November 1. With Samhain on October 31st traditionally celebrated as the Celtic New Year, it somehow feels appropriate to return to fiction after what became an 8-year hiatus. Synchronously, it’s also the start of NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month), which I might do again this year — not to finish a novel in that time, but to tap into the collective discipline of word counts and new writing habits.

Today’s misty morning captures my overall mood the past couple months:

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With David still Continue reading

Fairy Tales and Preparing Children for Life in the American Police State

I appreciate this post on Zero Hedge, as it explores what our broken culture does to our children, and it even makes some mention of fairy tales as the old ways of teaching children. If you are a parent, aunt, uncle, or grandparent troubled by what you see happening in America, I highly recommend picking up a copy of Bruno Bettelheim’s book, “The Uses of Enchantment,” which explores how specific fairy tales (the originals, not the Disney cotton candy and mind programming versions) provide tools for children to learn how to deal with adversity. By allowing children to read the scary tales and to recognize the Ancient Wisdom and skills embedded into the tales for safe keeping, we empower children to develop necessary skills and protections, which their rational and speech levels may not yet be capable of grasping.

This is a difficult post on Zero Hedge, but an important one, imho, since our children truly are our future. What kind of future are we leaving for them to navigate? What kind of tools and skills might we impart to them — now — so that they can become agents of change, instead of victims of it?

Zero Hedge ~ How Do you Prepare a Child for Life in the American Police State?

Submitted by John Whitehead via The Rutherford Institute,

“Fear isn’t so difficult to understand. After all, weren’t we all frightened as children? Nothing has changed since Little Red Riding Hood faced the big bad wolf. What frightens us today is exactly the same sort of thing that frightened us yesterday. It’s just a different wolf.” ~ Alfred Hitchcock

In an age dominated with news of school shootings, school lockdowns, police shootings of unarmed citizens (including children), SWAT team raids gone awry (leaving children devastated and damaged), reports of school resource officers tasering and shackling unruly students, and public schools undergoing lockdowns and active drills, I find myself wrestling with the question: how do you prepare a child for life in the American police state?

Every parent lives with a fear of the dangers that prey on young children: the predators who lurk at bus stops and playgrounds, the traffickers who make a living by selling young bodies, the peddlers who push drugs that ensnare and addict, the gangs that deal in violence and bullets, the drunk drivers, the school bullies, the madmen with guns, the diseases that can end a life before it’s truly begun, the cynicism of a modern age that can tarnish innocence, and the greed of a corporate age that makes its living by trading on young consumers.

It’s difficult enough raising a child in a world ravaged by war, disease, poverty and hate, but when you add the police state into the mix—with its battlefield mindset, weaponry, rigidity, surveillance, fascism, indoctrination, violence, etc.—it becomes near impossible to guard against the toxic stress of police shootings, SWAT team raids, students being tasered and shackled, lockdown drills, and a growing unease that some of the monsters of our age come dressed in government uniforms.

Children are taught from an early age that there are consequences for their actions.

Read the rest of this insightful article here.

Ross Bishop ~ Dealing with Dragons

This is one of the best articles I’ve read on Shadow Work, (real) faery tales and/or dragons and how they relate to feminine energies. Highly recommended! Thank you, Catherine. 🙂

Dealing with Dragons
by Ross Bishop

Fairy tales bring us the experience of thousands of years of dealing with negative entities (satans) and healing our emotional wounds. Tales that involve dealing with entities, something we have come to call the Hero or Heroine’s Journey or the dark night of the soul, are death/rebirth tales that typically involve dealing with dragons.

But, there is much more to dealing with the shadow than trying to vanquish it. These churchmen had not learned that evil cannot be conquered, it must be transcended. They also did not know that there is even more at stake here.

Once the dark side has been transcended it provides a wealth of resources that are not available in its unrecognized state. It contains primal qualities like power and passion, courage and strength, that are unavailable to our rational self. The journey into the cave to deal with the dragon is a journey to bring those aspects of the self into consciousness.

In creating dragons the old myth-makers drew upon powerful, fear creating images. Consider that a dragon is big and incredibly strong, with mystical powers. He is a serpent, he breathes fire and venom, has claws and fangs, his eyes are piercing and often hypnotic, he has thick scales to protect him, and great wings with which to fly. He swallows horses, sheep and humans in a single gulp. Consider the impact of the image (on the next page): it is vital, alive, and captivatingly powerful. This is a very scary beast!


(Caption) This is a painting by Ciruelo
from The Book of the Dragon. It is
presented with permission and through
the generosity of the artist.

A moment’s reflection will point to the allegoric nature of fairy tales when we consider that no one but a complete idiot would confront such a creature by himself and with only a sword or spear. There are obviously deeper meanings here.

The dragon is a personification of the animalistic nature of our unconscious dark side, of the shadow. He is the beast that dwells in the damp, dark dungeon where we confine our woundedness. This is our primal energy and we fear it. When it acts from the unconscious it can be dangerous! The Hero’s journey is a metaphor for one’s pilgrimage into the darkness. It involves bringing our wounds into the light of consciousness where they can be healed so that life can become richer and fuller. This is the reward of the hero’s journey.

Dragons have a strange passion for collecting gold and hoarding it for no apparent reason. A dragon told Phaedrus, “I guard my gold for no reason of reward or gain, but because great Zeus has made this the proper employment for dragons.” Any time you find something out of the ordinary in a myth or fairy tale you know there is a deeper meaning.

The gold that dragons hoard is the reward we receive for facing our fear and healing our wounds. It represents the bounty we receive when we quit fighting with life and learn to love ourselves. Before that, like our beast, dragon is wild and dangerous and the treasure is inaccessible.

There is an old myth from Serbia, a land of wonderful stories and story tellers, that illustrates the journey into the wound and offers some suggestions for dealing with the dragon. The story comes to us through Roger Lancelyn Green:

THE PRINCE AND THE DRAGON

There was once a king who had three sons, fine young men, so fond of hunting that scarcely a day passed without one of them going out to look for game. One morning the eldest gave chase to a hare, which led him up hill and down dale and through the forest until it sought shelter in an old mill beside the river.

The Prince followed it to the very door – and then turned in terror to fly for his life. For inside the mill stood a huge Dragon, breathing smoke and fire. But the Prince could not escape, for he was not across the bridge that led to the mill door before the Dragon’s fiery tongue caught him round the waist, plucked him out of the saddle and drew him into the mill; and he was seen no more.

A week passed; the Prince did not return home, and everyone began to grow uneasy. At last the king’s second son set out to look for his brother. He had not gone far, however, before up started the hare and led him up hill and down dale and through the forest until it again disappeared into the old mill. After it went the second Prince, and out of the door came the Dragon’s fiery tongue, coiled round his waist, plucked him from the saddle – and he too was seen no more.

Days went by and the king waited and waited for his sons to return, but all in vain. His youngest son wished to go in search of them, but for a long time the king would not allow him to go lest he should lose him also. But the young Prince begged so hard and promised to be so careful, that at last the King gave his permission, and ordered the best horse in the royal stables to be saddled for him.

Full of hope, the Prince started on his quest. But no sooner was he outside the city walls than up started the hare and away they went up hill and down dale and through the forest until they came to the old mill. As before the hare dashed in through the open door: but this Prince did not follow him. Wiser than his brothers, the young man turned back well before he reached the bridge over the river, saying: “There are as good hares in the forest as any that came out of it, and when I have caught them I can come back and look for you.”

But he rode about in the edge of the forest, out of sight of anyone in the mill but where he could keep a good eye on it. At last he saw an old woman come slowly out, cross over the bridge and sit down on a fallen tree not far from it. The Prince then rode cautiously out of the forest and up to where she sat. “Good day to you, little mother,” he said, taking off his hat to her politely. “Can you tell me where I shall find my hare?”

“Good morning, my son,” said the old woman. “That was no hare which you followed, but a dragon who has the power of changing his shape, and who has led many men here and then devoured them.” “Alas, then, my brothers have been eaten by the Dragon,” cried the Prince. “They have either been eaten, or put away to be eaten, where you can never find them,” answered the old woman. “And my advice to you is to go home at once before the same fate befalls you too.”

“Will you not come away with me out of this dreadful place?” asked the Prince. “I can promise you a kind welcome and a comfortable home for the rest of your life.” “I am the Dragon’s prisoner,” she replied sadly, “and I cannot escape from his spells. But I would help you in any way I can, if only I knew how.” “Then listen to me,” said the Prince earnestly. “When the Dragon comes home, ask him where he always goes when he leaves here, and what makes him so strong. Coax the secret from him carefully, and tell me next time I come.”

So the Prince went home and the old woman remained at the mill to coax the Dragon’s secret out of him. She succeeded so well that, after two false answers he gave her the true one: “My strength lies far away, so far that you could never reach it. Far, far from here is a kingdom, and by its capital city is a lake, and in the lake is a dragon, and inside the dragon is a wild boar, and inside the wild boar is a pigeon, and inside the pigeon a sparrow, and inside the sparrow is my strength.”

This sounded as if it must be true and the old woman sadly gave up coaxing the Dragon, feeling that never, never could anyone take his strength from him. When she told the Prince, however, he at once set out dressed as a shepherd to look for the far away country where the Dragon’s strength lay. He sought in vain until the months of his quest were growing into years; and then at last he came to a large city in a distant kingdom surrounded on three sides by a great lake.

This seemed a likely place and so he went to the Emperor who lived there and offered his services as a shepherd. The Emperor engaged him on the spot, saying: “You may succeed where others have failed. Graze my sheep beyond the lake, but be careful they do not go near the meadows which lie on the edge of the lake itself on this side. They will try to go straight to those meadows, but do not let them – for no sheep which have grazed there have ever come back.”

The Prince’s heart was filled with hope when he heard this. But he bowed low, promising to guard the sheep as best he could, and set out from the palace to take up his charge. First of all, however, he went to the market place and bought two greyhounds, a falcon, and a set of pipes. And only then did he drive out the sheep to pasture.

As soon as the sheep saw the lake, they dashed off as fast as their legs would carry them to the green meadows right in front of it. The Prince did not try to stop them: he simply perched his falcon on the branch of a tree, laid his pipes on the grass, and bade the greyhounds sit still. Then rolling up his sleeves and trousers, he waded into the water, crying as he did so: “Dragon! Dragon! If you are not a coward, come out and fight with me!”

“I am waiting for you, Prince!” came a deep voice from the lake, and a moment later out of the water came the very Dragon of the mill, huge and horrible to see. The Prince sprang upon him and they grappled with each other and fought and wrestled until the sun was high, and it was noonday. Then the Dragon gasped: “Prince, let me dip my burning head once into the lake, and I will hurl you to the top of the sky.” But the Prince answered: “Ah, ha, my dear Dragon, do not boast too soon! If the Emperor’s daughter were only here, and would kiss me on the forehead, I would throw you up higher still!” At once the Dragon’s hold loosened and he sank back into the lake and disappeared under the water.

As soon as it was evening, the Prince washed away all signs of the fight, took his falcon upon his shoulder, his pipes under his arm, and with his greyhounds in front and his flock following after him he set out for the city. As they passed through the streets the people stared in wonder, for never before had any flock returned from the meadow by the lake.

Next morning the Prince set out as before, and all things happened as on the previous day. But the Emperor had commanded two men to follow the Prince unseen and report on all that he did and all that happened. They were able to hide quite near the lake and heard all that the Prince and the Dragon said before the Dragon sunk once more under the water, and the Prince drove his flock safely home from the meadows whence no flock had ever before returned. Later that night the two men reported what they had seen and heard to the Emperor, and after he had heard it all, he repeated every word to his daughter. “Tomorrow,” he said when he had finished, “you must go with the shepherd to the lake and kiss him on the forehead when he asks for it.”

When the Princess heard these words she burst into tears and sobbed: “Will you indeed send me, your only child, to that dreadful lake from which I am quite certain never to return alive?” “Fear nothing, beloved daughter,” said the Emperor, “all will be well. Many shepherds have gone to the lake, but none of them or their sheep have ever returned. But this one in these two days has fought twice with the Dragon and has escaped without a wound, bringing back with him his flock completely unharmed. So I hope that, with your help, he will kill the Dragon tomorrow and free this land from the monster who has slain so many of our bravest men.”

As soon as day dawned the Princess went to the shepherd who laughed with delight when he saw her. But she only wept the more bitterly. “Do not weep, Heart of Gold,” he begged her. “Trust me and fear nothing. Only kiss me on the forehead the moment I ask for it, and all will be well.”

So they set out, with the shepherd-prince playing merrily on his pipes until they reached the lake. In an instant the sheep were scattered all over the lush meadows by the waterside. The Prince paid no attention, but placed his falcon on the tree and his pipes on the grass, while he bade his greyhounds lie beside them. Then he rolled up his trousers and his sleeves and waded into the water, saying: “Dragon! Dragon! If you are not a coward, come out and fight with me again!” “I am waiting for you, Prince,” came the deep voice out of the lake, and a moment later out of the water came the Dragon, huge and horrible to see. Swiftly he drew near to the bank and the Prince sprang upon him and they grappled with each other and fought and wrestled until the sun was high and it was noon day. Then the Dragon gasped: “Prince, let me dip my burning head once into the lake, and I will hurl you to the top of the sky.” But the Prince answered: “Ah-ha, my dear Dragon, do not boast too soon! If the Emperor’s daughter were only here, and would kiss me on the forehead, I would throw you up higher still!”

Hardly had he spoken when the Princess, who had been listening carefully, ran up and kissed him on the forehead. Then the Prince swung the Dragon straight up and over the clouds, and when he reached the earth again he broke into a thousand pieces. Out of the pieces there sprang a hare, and in a moment the greyhounds were after it and they caught it and killed it and tore it to bits. Out of these bits there came a pigeon which flew swiftly away. But the Prince slipped his falcon which towered straight into the air, swooped upon the bird and brought it to his master. The Prince cut open the dead pigeon and found the sparrow inside, just as the old woman had said he would.

“Now!” cried the Prince, holding the sparrow firmly in his hand, “now you shall tell me where I can find my brothers!” “Do not hurt me,” said the sparrow, “and I will tell you willingly. In the mill where the Dragon used to lurk there are three slender twigs. Cut off these twigs and strike the ground with them, and the iron door of a cellar will open. In the cellar you will find all those whom the Dragon was keeping on ice until he wanted them for his dinner. Breathe three times on each of them, and they will wake as if from sleep – and among them you will find your brothers.”

Then the Prince thanked the sparrow and let it fly safely away. He washed himself in the lake, set the falcon on his wrist, the pipes under his arm and with the greyhounds gambolling before and the sheep following after, he took the Princess by the hand and set out for the city. By the time they reached the palace they were followed by a vast cheering crowd. When they arrived, the Emperor, who had followed unobserved and seen all that had happened, was waiting there to greet them and lead them straight to the chapel royal to be married.

When the wedding and the feast were over, the Prince told them that he was not the poor shepherd he had pretended to be, but a very King’s son – and the Emperor rejoiced more than ever. But the Princess felt that she could not have loved him more had he turned out to be Lord of all the Earth. And when they had freed the two brothers and the other captives from the Dragon’s larder, the Prince and Princess settled down to live happily ever after, and in course of time became the best-loved Emperor and Empress that the land had ever known.

Let us consider aspects of the story: The fact there are no women main characters early in the story tells us that there will be an absence of the feminine (not female) energy and therefore an overabundance of masculine (not male) energy. It is likely that the theme of the story will be the resolution of that imbalance. This is reinforced by the preoccupation with hunting, a strong masculine image. Because there are three sons we are also alerted to mythical doings. Three is a magical number.

One thing we need to consider is the wisdom of two intelligent Princes spending their days chasing bunny rabbits around the kingdom. We know that either this kingdom is extremely short of suitable game, or something more serious is afoot. The mystery clears when we learn that the shape of a wild animal most often assumed by witches and other mystical beings is that of the hare (an animal that often represents spirit/life force).

The Princes’ inability to catch the hare illustrates the difficulty of integrating the vital energy of life from only one side of our beingness. Challenged, the two Princes pursue the vitalizing essence using their masculine energy, the only form available to them. When exposed (the open door to the mill) to the energy of the darkness (the fire-breathing dragon), the Princes are overcome by it. The two Princes are unable to make a shift in their consciousness and are captured by the darkness. Before the Princes can escape, the dragon grabs them and drags them inside. The inner darkness is simply too powerful to be overcome by force of will. This scene illustrates the raw power of the darkness. It shows how it can imprison a person who has not integrated the power of the shadow into his or her consciousness. This speaks to the powerful potential for seduction by the dark side (remember Darth Vader?). Note that the setting for this scene is a mill, a place of transformation where grain is changed into flour.

The contrast between the rigidity of the 2 Princes and the formlessness or shape changing of the dragon is notable. Dragons are associated with water, which is also formless. Lao Tsu pointed out that water is the most powerful of all things because of its ability to be flexible and adapt to any situation. If we cling rigidly to anything, we will be unable to integrate the life force into our consciousness. It is our attachment, our rigidity, that keeps us imprisoned and unable to heal.

The youngest Prince’s plea to search for his older brothers is a noble quest. The Prince sets out and immediately encounters the hare and pursues it. Again we know that something is up because no self-respecting Prince would waste his time chasing rabbits when he has pleaded so fervently to search for his missing brothers.

When the hare runs into the mill the young Prince does not follow him. There is a deeper wisdom in us and, because the young Prince is less attached than his older brothers, he instinctively knows that he is not prepared to take on whatever is in the mill.

Riding around the mill and watching carefully speaks to his wise use of awareness. When the old woman emerges from the mill the coincidence is simply too great and so, again, we know that larger forces are at work. The old woman is wise, as old women in fairy tales tend to be, because they usually represent the strong feminine. The Prince approaches her carefully and greets her courteously, because he respects the power that he faces. It is not clear from this part of the story whether the old woman is an aspect of the Prince’s own undiscovered feminine hidden in the darkness (the dragon) or a more universal feminine wisdom. In any case, it is good that it has come.

Consider what takes place with the old woman: The Prince has listened to his inner wisdom and avoided a confrontation with the shadow that he was certain to lose. The old woman, in the dragon’s power if not the dragon itself, has offered to help him. If the dragon were simply after the Prince it would prevent the old woman from helping him, or use her as bait to lure him in. Instead, the old woman has come forward and offered to help the young Prince. She offers the wisdom of the unknown aspect of his being and together they hold the key to his dilemma.

The masculine response would be to gather an army and assault the mill. Although there are times when this is the only alternative, that is not so in this instance. Power cannot subdue darkness, only compassion can (remember the lessons of Prohibition, the War On Drugs or our present campaign against terrorism?). The Prince seems to know instinctively that attacking the mill would not work. Will power is wonderful for some things, but it is no match for the energy of the shadow.

Instead, the Prince asks the old woman to coax from the dragon the secret of its power. And, of course, she does. The Prince is wise enough to know that he is up against something far greater than himself and so he seeks to learn about it. He finds a teacher. We must consider again that a dragon with magical powers and great wisdom would not reveal the source of his strength unless he wanted someone to discover it.

When she explains that “Inside the dragon is a wild boar, and inside the wild boar is a hare, and inside the hare is a pigeon, and inside the pigeon is a sparrow, and inside the sparrow is the dragon’s strength,” she illustrates the layers we must peel away to get to the core of the wound. Notice the declining nature of ferocity and size as we move through the layers to the core, coming to the sparrow and its wisdom – the source of real power.

Having learned about the darkness from this teacher, the Prince prepares to set out on his quest. He has received information, now he must put it into practice. He uses the guise of a shepherd, not a warrior, because he is not yet a True Prince.

The kingdom associated with a lake is a wonderful metaphor; the deep pool of the unconscious in which the dragon lives and for which we must quest. After years of searching, for this is not an easy journey, the Prince comes to the kingdom. He has doubtless experienced suffering, as have you and, like you, is standing at the mouth of the dragon’s cave, peering into the wound.

The Emperor, not a mere king, who rules this place hires this young shepherd. Again anomalies: What is an Emperor doing wasting his time hiring shepherds? In any case, the Emperor cautions the young man to keep the sheep away from the meadow near the lake, for no sheep that have grazed there have ever returned. (Sheep do not fare well against the darkness.) We know that the Prince has come to the right place.

In cautioning the Prince the Emperor expresses the anxiety of the establishment: “Don’t take risks, don’t rock the boat, we’ve lost too many sheep already.” The Prince however, disobeys the Emperor, intuitively knowing that playing it safe will not serve the situation. There is a time to break the rules and do it your own way. However, these times must be carefully chosen.

Too often we break the rules for the wrong reasons and at the wrong times. Lao Tsu wrote that running a great nation is like cooking a small fish, it is all a matter of careful timing. The two greyhounds and the falcon that the Prince obtains are noble hunting animals and strong allies. One might consider them to represent the personal resources one gathers as the experience of the journey unfolds.

Confronted by the Prince, the dragon’s response, “I am waiting for you, Prince,” tells us that he knew the Prince was coming! The dragon, described as huge and horrible, springs from the depths and the two begin to wrestle. Again we find an anomaly. Here is an unarmed and unprotected youth struggling with an obviously more powerful adversary. The Prince knows instinctively that the only way to deal with the beast is to take it on directly.

We can only imagine his courage, and fear, as he wades into his unconscious for the encounter. He must go after the dragon. It cannot be done any other way. Heroism aside, the dragon has invited the contest and, presumably does not really want to vanquish the Prince. If he does, he has gone to great lengths to simply acquire lunch.

The two fight until high noon and the dragon gasps, “Let me dip my burning head once into the lake, the waters of life, and I will hurl you to the top of the sky.” The Prince responds, “If the Emperor’s daughter were only here to kiss my forehead, I would throw you higher still!” The dragon immediately withdraws to the bottom of the lake.

There are many important points in this particular part of the story. The Prince is struggling with the dragon as we all struggle with our inner beast. We struggle because that is all we can do when we only have access to part of our being.

The two fight until high noon, the time when there is no shadow. Operating simply from his masculine side, the Prince will be unable, as were his brothers, to bring the darkness into the light. At best it will be a standoff. But, with the benefit of the totality of his being (the kiss from the Princess, representing his feminine side), the Prince can easily subdue, i.e. bring into consciousness the darkness represented by the dragon. When presented with this fact, the dragon immediately withdraws for there can be no further struggle. How does the Prince know this? We all have access to inner wisdom if we will take the time to listen.

On the second day the Prince and the dragon wrestle again until noon. The Prince has sustained no wounds and has lost none of the sheep, but he and the dragon are, at best, even. Overcoming darkness is not a simple thing. It takes effort and time.

On the third day (you have to do things three times in fairy tales) the princess, named Heart of Gold, has reluctantly accompanied the Prince. The Princess represents the feminine aspect of the hero and together with the dragon and the Prince is the third piece of this story’s puzzle. The Princess is uncertain because she has not experienced the protection of the Prince’s masculine energy. This speaks to the incompleteness of any single aspect of our beingness. The Heart of Gold is the immortal and untarnishable heart center through which we balance and blend the forces of our lives.

The Princess’ kiss symbolizes the essential integration of the whole self. Realizing his self worth, i.e. his love for himself, the Prince throws the dragon up, and over the clouds, into the light. Now that he is complete, the Prince simply transcends the old struggle. The transcendence of the struggle is a point easily missed. The Prince did not vanquish the dragon as much as he moved the whole process to a higher level where struggle was irrelevant.

In reading fairy tales it is important to remember that each character in the story represents some aspect or quality of the hero or heroine. Each tale is the story of one person’s inner journey. In this story a fierce and powerful dragon has been defeated by the power of self-love.

In integrating and learning to love himself the Prince will move to another level of consciousness. And the dragon knows that through this process he will be transcended. There is no room for darkness in a being filled with compassion and light. Another important image is the Prince’s wrestling with the dragon. This is not an intellectual process. The Prince cannot resolve the conflict by sitting on the shore reading books or going to seminars about dragons. He must be willing to wade into the dragon’s domain and wrestle with the beast, a dangerous reptile! How repulsive! That is exactly how it feels when we confront the shadow. Yet, if we are to transcend our pain we must find the courage to face whatever is in the cave and meet it on its own terms.

The only way we can effectively integrate all the aspects of ourselves is through the transformative process of facing our darkness. No amount of understanding or analysis will substitute. The dragon does not wish to defeat us, as he is a part of us! His ferocity is a facade designed to force us to find the inner courage to face our pain and fear. When we make that decision we have already won, for then the dragon cannot defeat us.

Courage, not strength, is the essence of the Hero’s Journey. Confronting the fears associated with wounds is not enjoyable. This fear can make even the strongest people weak. Most of us struggle against the fear, but this just creates frustration and consumes enormous amounts of personal energy.

Fairy tales teach us that fear of the dragon is a self-created myth. The Ancient Ones explain that the difficult part is rolling up our sleeves, wading into the lake and calling the dragon out. This story tells us that if this unarmed boy can face his dragon, his shadow, so can you.

The fear exists to keep you immobile, to keep you away from what has been an unsafe place. Some people wait until they hit bottom, until their lives fall apart, before they are willing to peer into their woundedness. They create so much despair that anything would be better than their deadlocked struggle with themselves. Only then will they relinquish control and surrender.

The transformation of the dragon from a reptilian, water dwelling monster, to a ferocious land mammal, and then to the various birds and finally to the tiny sparrow, speaks to the evolution that occurs in our shadow as we acknowledge, accept, and finally come to love it. The birds symbolize the movement to the higher realms of spirit enabled by the integration of the self.

With the sparrow in hand, the spirit of the dragon says, “I will tell you willingly.” The dragon, once a seeming enemy, has become an ally now that it has been integrated into consciousness (remember Beauty and the Beast?). The Prince frees the sparrow, knowing that it will be available whenever he needs it.

The brothers are frozen, we can presume, by their inability to change. The Prince does not set out to free his brothers immediately, however. He must complete his own integration (marry the Princess) because only then can he truly help others. The Emperor conducts the wedding and the Prince reveals himself to be a king’s son, for he has become a True Prince.

Freeing the brothers by breathing on them three times can be construed as the teaching, or the service, one performs after healing oneself for those still held prisoner by the darkness.

They all live happily ever after and the kingdom is renewed through their unity. The Prince incidentally, becomes an Emperor not just a king. And we know that somewhere up in the clouds the dragon is smiling.

In the healing process one must identify the wound, accept the pain associated with it, become free of attachments to it and find the courage to march into the cave and face it. Facing it is not doing battle with it. Struggle is a human way, it is not God’s. That is a hangover from the European age of conquest that sought to subdue the primitive world under the boot of western values.

The healing process is one of learning to love and heal the wounded parts of the self that have been stuffed into the bag. After all, they are just doing their thing. Bringing the wound into the light transforms it and allows one to release the negative entities associated with it. Healing the wound converts this liability into a significant personal resource.

Healing makes a great deal of energy available for life. It creates compassion, brings us into direct contact with the infinite wisdom and power of the light. This is the purpose of the life. This rite of passage is called the Heroine’s Journey because it is one of the most courageous trials one can undertake.

©2004 Blue Lotus Press.
Reproduction is permitted with attribution.

link to Ross Bishop’s blog

Shadows of darkness and light

Another deeply insightful and timely post by Anna Nimm!
“This is a story about suffering trauma, falling into the pit of powerlessness and despair, rising out of it through anger, and the eventual reconciliation that doesn’t simply recapture the power that was lost but transcends it. ” … “Upon second sight, it appears to me that Maleficent is a story about the golden shadow, an allegory of developing from childhood into adulthood, and of how the self integrates and eventually overcomes experiences of loss, pain and trauma.” … “Owning one’s shadow leads to integration, to a kind of sovereignty or self-mastery that arises from being able to balance the contradictory forces and energies within the self.” Once again, unpacking a fairy tale brings great reward. Thank you, Anna Nimm!

Profane Light

Aurora, the dawn, the princess of light and goodness who is blessed by fairies to always have a smile on her face, has a dark, malefic shadow. When Aurora meets Maleficent (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EYemY3xFsB), she says, “I know who you are. You’ve been watching me my whole life. Your shadow has been following me ever since I was small.” She invites the shadow to come out from the dark forest so she can look upon her face. Maleficent answers “then you’ll be afraid.” In this teaser clip (which doesn’t correspond to the actual timeline of events in the film), when Maleficent steps out from the darkness, a wall of thorns rises up around the enchanted forest, separating the shadow world of dark, mythical creatures from the human kingdom of light. It sounds like a perfect Jungian account of our first encounter with the shadow – when we first get a glimpse of…

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Perspectives on Fairy-Story: Tolkien, Lewis, MacDonald, Chesterton & Clark

“The peculiar quality of the ‘joy’ in successful Fantasy can thus be explained as a sudden glimpse of the underlying reality or truth. It is not only a ‘consolation’ for the sorrow of this world; but a satisfaction, and an answer to that question, ‘Is it true?’” ~ J.R.R. Tolkien

A lovely piece by Becca Tarnas:

Becca Tarnas

“The realm of fairy-story is wide and deep and high and filled with many things: all manner of beasts and birds are found there; shoreless seas and stars uncounted; beauty that is an enchantment, and an ever-present peril; both joy and sorrow as sharp as swords.” – J.R.R. Tolkien[1]

With these words J.R.R. Tolkien introduces his readers to Faërie, a realm encountered by means of Imagination, the domain of fairy-story. But what are fairy-stories? Often they have been construed as short tales written for children, of little weight or importance in the world of adult matters, yet this simplifying definition is addressed and overturned by Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, George MacDonald, G.K. Chesterton, and Stephen Clark in five separate essays written in defense of fairy-story. From different angles, but much the same perspective, these five writers address law and morality, fantasy and reality, Imagination and Truth, as they are brought…

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Rumpelstiltskin

A little Halloween fun for you … and quite in line with recent themes on this blog — for those with eyes to see and ears to hear. 😉

Fairy Tales by the Brothers Grimm

Rumpelstiltskin

By the side of a wood, in a country a long way off, ran a fine stream of water; and upon the stream there stood a mill. The miller’s house was close by, and the miller, you must know, had a very beautiful daughter. She was, moreover, very shrewd and clever; and the miller was so proud of her, that he one day told the king of the land, who used to come and hunt in the wood, that his daughter could spin gold out of straw. Now this king was very fond of money; and when he heard the miller’s boast his greediness was raised, and he sent for the girl to be brought before him. Then he led her to a chamber in his palace where there was a great heap of straw, and gave her a spinning-wheel, and said, ’All this must be spun into gold before morning, as you love your life.’ It was in vain that the poor maiden said that it was only a silly boast of her father, for that she could do no such thing as spin straw into gold: the chamber door was locked, and she was left alone.

She sat down in one corner of the room, and began to bewail her hard fate; when on a sudden the door opened, and a droll-looking little man hobbled in, and said, ’Good morrow to you, my good lass; what are you weeping for?’ ’Alas!’ said she, ’I must spin this straw into gold, and I know not how.’ ’What will you give me,’ said the hobgoblin, ’to do it for you?’ ’My necklace,’ replied the maiden. He took her at her word, and sat himself down to the wheel, and whistled and sang:

’Round about, round about,
Lo and behold!
Reel away, reel away,
Straw into gold!’

And round about the wheel went merrily; the work was quickly done, and the straw was all spun into gold.

When the king came and saw this, he was greatly astonished and pleased; but his heart grew still more greedy of gain, and he shut up the poor miller’s daughter again with a fresh task. Then she knew not what to do, and sat down once more to weep; but the dwarf soon opened the door, and said, ’What will you give me to do your task?’ ’The ring on my finger,’ said she. So her little friend took the ring, and began to work at the wheel again, and whistled and sang:

’Round about, round about,
Lo and behold!
Reel away, reel away,
Straw into gold!’

till, long before morning, all was done again.

The king was greatly delighted to see all this glittering treasure; but still he had not enough: so he took the miller’s daughter to a yet larger heap, and said, ’All this must be spun tonight; and if it is, you shall be my queen.’ As soon as she was alone that dwarf came in, and said, ’What will you give me to spin gold for you this third time?’ ’I have nothing left,’ said she. ’Then say you will give me,’ said the little man, ’the first little child that you may have when you are queen.’ ’That may never be,’ thought the miller’s daughter: and as she knew no other way to get her task done, she said she would do what he asked. Round went the wheel again to the old song, and the manikin once more spun the heap into gold. The king came in the morning, and, finding all he wanted, was forced to keep his word; so he married the miller’s daughter, and she really became queen.

At the birth of her first little child she was very glad, and forgot the dwarf, and what she had said. But one day he came into her room, where she was sitting playing with her baby, and put her in mind of it. Then she grieved sorely at her misfortune, and said she would give him all the wealth of the kingdom if he would let her off, but in vain; till at last her tears softened him, and he said, ’I will give you three days’ grace, and if during that time you tell me my name, you shall keep your child.’

Now the queen lay awake all night, thinking of all the odd names that she had ever heard; and she sent messengers all over the land to find out new ones. The next day the little man came, and she began with TIMOTHY, ICHABOD, BENJAMIN, JEREMIAH, and all the names she could remember; but to all and each of them he said, ’Madam, that is not my name.’

The second day she began with all the comical names she could hear of, BANDY-LEGS, HUNCHBACK, CROOK-SHANKS, and so on; but the little gentleman still said to every one of them, ’Madam, that is not my name.’

The third day one of the messengers came back, and said, ’I have travelled two days without hearing of any other names; but yesterday, as I was climbing a high hill, among the trees of the forest where the fox and the hare bid each other good night, I saw a little hut; and before the hut burnt a fire; and round about the fire a funny little dwarf was dancing upon one leg, and singing:

’”Merrily the feast I’ll make.
Today I’ll brew, tomorrow bake;
Merrily I’ll dance and sing,
For next day will a stranger bring.
Little does my lady dream
Rumpelstiltskin is my name!”’

When the queen heard this she jumped for joy, and as soon as her little friend came she sat down upon her throne, and called all her court round to enjoy the fun; and the nurse stood by her side with the baby in her arms, as if it was quite ready to be given up. Then the little man began to chuckle at the thought of having the poor child, to take home with him to his hut in the woods; and he cried out, ’Now, lady, what is my name?’ ’Is it JOHN?’ asked she. ’No, madam!’ ’Is it TOM?’ ’No, madam!’ ’Is it JEMMY?’ ’It is not.’ ’Can your name be RUMPELSTILTSKIN?’ said the lady slyly. ’Some witch told you that!– some witch told you that!’ cried the little man, and dashed his right foot in a rage so deep into the floor, that he was forced to lay hold of it with both hands to pull it out.

Then he made the best of his way off, while the nurse laughed and the baby crowed; and all the court jeered at him for having had so much trouble for nothing, and said, ’We wish you a very good morning, and a merry feast, Mr RUMPLESTILTSKIN!’

 

This eBook of “Fairy Tales” by the Grimm Brothers (based on translations from the Grimms’ Kinder und Hausmärchen by Edgar Taylor and Edgar Taylor and Marian Edwardes) belongs to the public domain. Complete book.
Authorama – Classic Literature, free of copyright. About…

Hansel and Gretel

Fairy Tales by the Brothers Grimm


Hansel and Gretel

Hard by a great forest dwelt a poor wood-cutter with his wife and his two children. The boy was called Hansel and the girl Gretel. He had little to bite and to break, and once when great dearth fell on the land, he could no longer procure even daily bread. Now when he thought over this by night in his bed, and tossed about in his anxiety, he groaned and said to his wife: ’What is to become of us? How are we to feed our poor children, when we no longer have anything even for ourselves?’ ’I’ll tell you what, husband,’ answered the woman, ’early tomorrow morning we will take the children out into the forest to where it is the thickest; there we will light a fire for them, and give each of them one more piece of bread, and then we will go to our work and leave them alone. They will not find the way home again, and we shall be rid of them.’ ’No, wife,’ said the man, ’I will not do that; how can I bear to leave my children alone in the forest?–the wild animals would soon come and tear them to pieces.’ ’O, you fool!’ said she, ’then we must all four die of hunger, you may as well plane the planks for our coffins,’ and she left him no peace until he consented. ’But I feel very sorry for the poor children, all the same,’ said the man.

The two children had also not been able to sleep for hunger, and had heard what their stepmother had said to their father. Gretel wept bitter tears, and said to Hansel: ’Now all is over with us.’ ’Be quiet, Gretel,’ said Hansel, ’do not distress yourself, I will soon find a way to help us.’ And when the old folks had fallen asleep, he got up, put on his little coat, opened the door below, and crept outside. The moon shone brightly, and the white pebbles which lay in front of the house glittered like real silver pennies. Hansel stooped and stuffed the little pocket of his coat with as many as he could get in. Then he went back and said to Gretel: ’Be comforted, dear little sister, and sleep in peace, God will not forsake us,’ and he lay down again in his bed. When day dawned, but before the sun had risen, the woman came and awoke the two children, saying: ’Get up, you sluggards! we are going into the forest to fetch wood.’ She gave each a little piece of bread, and said: ’There is something for your dinner, but do not eat it up before then, for you will get nothing else.’ Gretel took the bread under her apron, as Hansel had the pebbles in his pocket. Then they all set out together on the way to the forest. When they had walked a short time, Hansel stood still and peeped back at the house, and did so again and again. His father said: ’Hansel, what are you looking at there and staying behind for? Pay attention, and do not forget how to use your legs.’ ’Ah, father,’ said Hansel, ’I am looking at my little white cat, which is sitting up on the roof, and wants to say goodbye to me.’ The wife said: ’Fool, that is not your little cat, that is the morning sun which is shining on the chimneys.’ Hansel, however, had not been looking back at the cat, but had been constantly throwing one of the white pebble-stones out of his pocket on the road.

When they had reached the middle of the forest, the father said: ’Now, children, pile up some wood, and I will light a fire that you may not be cold.’ Hansel and Gretel gathered brushwood together, as high as a little hill. The brushwood was lighted, and when the flames were burning very high, the woman said: ’Now, children, lay yourselves down by the fire and rest, we will go into the forest and cut some wood. When we have done, we will come back and fetch you away.’

Hansel and Gretel sat by the fire, and when noon came, each ate a little piece of bread, and as they heard the strokes of the wood-axe they believed that their father was near. It was not the axe, however, but a branch which he had fastened to a withered tree which the wind was blowing backwards and forwards. And as they had been sitting such a long time, their eyes closed with fatigue, and they fell fast asleep. When at last they awoke, it was already dark night. Gretel began to cry and said: ’How are we to get out of the forest now?’ But Hansel comforted her and said: ’Just wait a little, until the moon has risen, and then we will soon find the way.’ And when the full moon had risen, Hansel took his little sister by the hand, and followed the pebbles which shone like newly-coined silver pieces, and showed them the way.

They walked the whole night long, and by break of day came once more to their father’s house. They knocked at the door, and when the woman opened it and saw that it was Hansel and Gretel, she said: ’You naughty children, why have you slept so long in the forest?–we thought you were never coming back at all!’ The father, however, rejoiced, for it had cut him to the heart to leave them behind alone.

Not long afterwards, there was once more great dearth throughout the land, and the children heard their mother saying at night to their father: ’Everything is eaten again, we have one half loaf left, and that is the end. The children must go, we will take them farther into the wood, so that they will not find their way out again; there is no other means of saving ourselves!’ The man’s heart was heavy, and he thought: ’It would be better for you to share the last mouthful with your children.’ The woman, however, would listen to nothing that he had to say, but scolded and reproached him. He who says A must say B, likewise, and as he had yielded the first time, he had to do so a second time also.

The children, however, were still awake and had heard the conversation. When the old folks were asleep, Hansel again got up, and wanted to go out and pick up pebbles as he had done before, but the woman had locked the door, and Hansel could not get out. Nevertheless he comforted his little sister, and said: ’Do not cry, Gretel, go to sleep quietly, the good God will help us.’

Early in the morning came the woman, and took the children out of their beds. Their piece of bread was given to them, but it was still smaller than the time before. On the way into the forest Hansel crumbled his in his pocket, and often stood still and threw a morsel on the ground. ’Hansel, why do you stop and look round?’ said the father, ’go on.’ ’I am looking back at my little pigeon which is sitting on the roof, and wants to say goodbye to me,’ answered Hansel. ’Fool!’ said the woman, ’that is not your little pigeon, that is the morning sun that is shining on the chimney.’ Hansel, however little by little, threw all the crumbs on the path.

The woman led the children still deeper into the forest, where they had never in their lives been before. Then a great fire was again made, and the mother said: ’Just sit there, you children, and when you are tired you may sleep a little; we are going into the forest to cut wood, and in the evening when we are done, we will come and fetch you away.’ When it was noon, Gretel shared her piece of bread with Hansel, who had scattered his by the way. Then they fell asleep and evening passed, but no one came to the poor children. They did not awake until it was dark night, and Hansel comforted his little sister and said: ’Just wait, Gretel, until the moon rises, and then we shall see the crumbs of bread which I have strewn about, they will show us our way home again.’ When the moon came they set out, but they found no crumbs, for the many thousands of birds which fly about in the woods and fields had picked them all up. Hansel said to Gretel: ’We shall soon find the way,’ but they did not find it. They walked the whole night and all the next day too from morning till evening, but they did not get out of the forest, and were very hungry, for they had nothing to eat but two or three berries, which grew on the ground. And as they were so weary that their legs would carry them no longer, they lay down beneath a tree and fell asleep.

It was now three mornings since they had left their father’s house. They began to walk again, but they always came deeper into the forest, and if help did not come soon, they must die of hunger and weariness. When it was mid-day, they saw a beautiful snow-white bird sitting on a bough, which sang so delightfully that they stood still and listened to it. And when its song was over, it spread its wings and flew away before them, and they followed it until they reached a little house, on the roof of which it alighted; and when they approached the little house they saw that it was built of bread and covered with cakes, but that the windows were of clear sugar. ’We will set to work on that,’ said Hansel, ’and have a good meal. I will eat a bit of the roof, and you Gretel, can eat some of the window, it will taste sweet.’ Hansel reached up above, and broke off a little of the roof to try how it tasted, and Gretel leant against the window and nibbled at the panes. Then a soft voice cried from the parlour:

’Nibble, nibble, gnaw,
Who is nibbling at my little house?’

The children answered:

’The wind, the wind,
The heaven-born wind,’

and went on eating without disturbing themselves. Hansel, who liked the taste of the roof, tore down a great piece of it, and Gretel pushed out the whole of one round window-pane, sat down, and enjoyed herself with it. Suddenly the door opened, and a woman as old as the hills, who supported herself on crutches, came creeping out. Hansel and Gretel were so terribly frightened that they let fall what they had in their hands. The old woman, however, nodded her head, and said: ’Oh, you dear children, who has brought you here? do come in, and stay with me. No harm shall happen to you.’ She took them both by the hand, and led them into her little house. Then good food was set before them, milk and pancakes, with sugar, apples, and nuts. Afterwards two pretty little beds were covered with clean white linen, and Hansel and Gretel lay down in them, and thought they were in heaven.

The old woman had only pretended to be so kind; she was in reality a wicked witch, who lay in wait for children, and had only built the little house of bread in order to entice them there. When a child fell into her power, she killed it, cooked and ate it, and that was a feast day with her. Witches have red eyes, and cannot see far, but they have a keen scent like the beasts, and are aware when human beings draw near. When Hansel and Gretel came into her neighbourhood, she laughed with malice, and said mockingly: ’I have them, they shall not escape me again!’ Early in the morning before the children were awake, she was already up, and when she saw both of them sleeping and looking so pretty, with their plump and rosy cheeks she muttered to herself: ’That will be a dainty mouthful!’ Then she seized Hansel with her shrivelled hand, carried him into a little stable, and locked him in behind a grated door. Scream as he might, it would not help him. Then she went to Gretel, shook her till she awoke, and cried: ’Get up, lazy thing, fetch some water, and cook something good for your brother, he is in the stable outside, and is to be made fat. When he is fat, I will eat him.’ Gretel began to weep bitterly, but it was all in vain, for she was forced to do what the wicked witch commanded.

And now the best food was cooked for poor Hansel, but Gretel got nothing but crab-shells. Every morning the woman crept to the little stable, and cried: ’Hansel, stretch out your finger that I may feel if you will soon be fat.’ Hansel, however, stretched out a little bone to her, and the old woman, who had dim eyes, could not see it, and thought it was Hansel’s finger, and was astonished that there was no way of fattening him. When four weeks had gone by, and Hansel still remained thin, she was seized with impatience and would not wait any longer. ’Now, then, Gretel,’ she cried to the girl, ’stir yourself, and bring some water. Let Hansel be fat or lean, tomorrow I will kill him, and cook him.’ Ah, how the poor little sister did lament when she had to fetch the water, and how her tears did flow down her cheeks! ’Dear God, do help us,’ she cried. ’If the wild beasts in the forest had but devoured us, we should at any rate have died together.’ ’Just keep your noise to yourself,’ said the old woman, ’it won’t help you at all.’

Early in the morning, Gretel had to go out and hang up the cauldron with the water, and light the fire. ’We will bake first,’ said the old woman, ’I have already heated the oven, and kneaded the dough.’ She pushed poor Gretel out to the oven, from which flames of fire were already darting. ’Creep in,’ said the witch, ’and see if it is properly heated, so that we can put the bread in.’ And once Gretel was inside, she intended to shut the oven and let her bake in it, and then she would eat her, too. But Gretel saw what she had in mind, and said: ’I do not know how I am to do it; how do I get in?’ ’Silly goose,’ said the old woman. ’The door is big enough; just look, I can get in myself!’ and she crept up and thrust her head into the oven. Then Gretel gave her a push that drove her far into it, and shut the iron door, and fastened the bolt. Oh! then she began to howl quite horribly, but Gretel ran away and the godless witch was miserably burnt to death.

Gretel, however, ran like lightning to Hansel, opened his little stable, and cried: ’Hansel, we are saved! The old witch is dead!’ Then Hansel sprang like a bird from its cage when the door is opened. How they did rejoice and embrace each other, and dance about and kiss each other! And as they had no longer any need to fear her, they went into the witch’s house, and in every corner there stood chests full of pearls and jewels. ’These are far better than pebbles!’ said Hansel, and thrust into his pockets whatever could be got in, and Gretel said: ’I, too, will take something home with me,’ and filled her pinafore full. ’But now we must be off,’ said Hansel, ’that we may get out of the witch’s forest.’

When they had walked for two hours, they came to a great stretch of water. ’We cannot cross,’ said Hansel, ’I see no foot-plank, and no bridge.’ ’And there is also no ferry,’ answered Gretel, ’but a white duck is swimming there: if I ask her, she will help us over.’ Then she cried:

’Little duck, little duck, dost thou see,
Hansel and Gretel are waiting for thee?
There’s never a plank, or bridge in sight,
Take us across on thy back so white.’

The duck came to them, and Hansel seated himself on its back, and told his sister to sit by him. ’No,’ replied Gretel, ’that will be too heavy for the little duck; she shall take us across, one after the other.’ The good little duck did so, and when they were once safely across and had walked for a short time, the forest seemed to be more and more familiar to them, and at length they saw from afar their father’s house. Then they began to run, rushed into the parlour, and threw themselves round their father’s neck. The man had not known one happy hour since he had left the children in the forest; the woman, however, was dead. Gretel emptied her pinafore until pearls and precious stones ran about the room, and Hansel threw one handful after another out of his pocket to add to them. Then all anxiety was at an end, and they lived together in perfect happiness. My tale is done, there runs a mouse; whosoever catches it, may make himself a big fur cap out of it.

 

 

This eBook of “Fairy Tales” by the Grimm Brothers (based on translations from the Grimms’ Kinder und Hausmärchen by Edgar Taylor and Edgar Taylor and Marian Edwardes) belongs to the public domain. Complete book.
Authorama – Classic Literature, free of copyright. About…