Posts Tagged ‘Faery Gardening’

Garden Update: Misty Morn, Faery Godmother, Cat Familiar, and Osage Orange

I’ve been in hermit mode here — doing intuitive sessions, taking walks, exercising, cooking myself on the BioMat and completing an astonishing breadth and depth of studies before I shift my focus to fiction writing on November 1. With Samhain on October 31st traditionally celebrated as the Celtic New Year, it somehow feels appropriate to return to fiction after what became an 8-year hiatus. Synchronously, it’s also the start of NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month), which I might do again this year — not to finish a novel in that time, but to tap into the collective discipline of word counts and new writing habits.

Today’s misty morning captures my overall mood the past couple months:

IMG_1390

With David still Continue reading

Upcoming Classes

Thanks to everyone for the enthusiasm and quick feedback about class interest and preferred dates. (It turns out I need to return to Pennsylvania again for ten days in mid-May to support my mom and help her clear out the old house, so the possible Reiki 1 class will occur either by special arrangement or sometime in June.) More classes (including tarot training) to come, but these two are set for the weekend of June 11-12, 2016:

SPECIAL TOPICS IN REIKI:

Deepening Your Experience of the Distant Healing Symbol

Saturday, June 11, 2016

10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Goshen, IN at Haus Am See (address given upon registration)

In response to many student requests, this is a reprise of a class series I taught in Reno/Tahoe and Sedona. In this series, we cover Special Topics in Reiki that we either don’t have time for or can only scratch the surface of during certification classes. This particular workshop focuses on “Deepening Your Experience of the Distance Healing Symbol.” We will discuss some of the more esoteric aspects of both distance healing and the Reiki symbol itself, unpacking layers upon layers of symbolism and function.

Many students find this symbol intimidating and difficult to remember or work with. This class will explore and demonstrate why it’s worth the effort to learn and grow comfortable using this symbol. We will cover distance in space, as well as time, including, but not limited to past, future and parallel applications. Students will learn how this symbol can help you to “bend time,” empower intentions, heal very old trauma, and encode success in alternate versions of yourself/your reality. Those interested in previous lifetimes will also learn how this symbol can enhance intuitive access to past life experiences for easier reclamation of old gifts and healing of ancient traumas.

We will take an onsite break for lunch, which can include access to garden-fresh produce and a stroll through the gardens. Weather permitting, we can even eat outside on the porch or near the fountain and herb spiral.

$200 ($177 if prepaid by 5/11/16). Haus Am See offers a larger classroom than our home, but there has been a lot of interest over the years in these types of classes. In order to ensure your spot, I suggest early registration. Pre-requisite: must have Reiki Level 2 certification from me or another Reiki Master Teacher. Please contact me to sign up.

 

***Both guest bedrooms are already booked for this entire weekend.***

 

INTRO TO EARTH HEALING

Sunday, June 12, 2016

10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Goshen, IN at Haus Am See (address given upon registration)

This introductory workshop on Earth Healing will be specially tailored to the day’s students. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Listening to and getting to know your local land
  • Taking hyperlocal actions to create holistic, global effects
  • Recognizing signs from animals and Nature
  • Working with the Faerie Realm, Nature Spirits or Spirits of the Land
  • Grounding techniques for connecting with the Earth and trees
  • Connections between soil health and soul health, humus and humans
  • Rituals for healing
  • Manifesting/connecting with your own magical spot on Earth
  • Discerning when and how the Earth is calling you
  • Setting up or expanding your garden
  • Cultivating beauty in unlikely areas
  • Becoming the change you wish to see in the world
  • Lessons gleaned from Malcolm Gladwell’s “The Tipping Point”
  • Back to Eden/wood mulch method
  • Gardening in small spaces or tricky spots
  • Ways to give back in the Cycle of Life

When you sign up, please let me know your specific interests, so that I can design a workshop most suited to the interests of those attending. Class will include a working lunch and (weather permitting) fresh produce and time in the garden. Some plant starts/cuttings will also be available if you’d like to bring a little of this land regeneration energy home with you.

Cost is $177. Haus Am See offers a larger classroom than our home, but there has been a lot of interest over the years in this sort of class. In order to ensure your spot, I suggest early registration. Please contact me to sign up.

 

My Faery Garden Landscaper Is Back!

A couple weeks ago, I mentioned having sent my Faery Garden Landscaper (pseudonym: “Heather”) on her very first ever vacation until I got caught up on all the earlier garden projects. Well, as of yesterday afternoon, I’m all caught up, and now she’s back. I just realized it this morning when some telltale magickal signatures showed themselves outside; however, I’m quite sure she actually returned last night. Because last night … oh, my … last night ….

Let’s just say, out of nowhere, someone inspired me to buy a lot more fruit trees and berry bushes for planting this summer, which means much more work on my part. The ground is harder; they’ll need more water and extra care; they’ll need lots of cardboard and hauling of wood mulch … and have I mentioned it’s July in the absurdly humid Midwest?

Everything lined up, though, including our landlord dropping by yesterday and expressing his heartfelt exuberance about me planting more fruit trees in the backyard, along with ornamental medicinal herbs along the south and west sides of his extra garage behind our house. He’s always given me freedom in the yard, but yesterday, he got visibly and verbally excited about my (distant) prospect of more fruit trees and “plants that no one will know to pick.” He actually got a mischievous glint in his eye as he imagined all these beautiful flowers that have “secret” medicinal uses.

During that same conversation, our next door neighbor (who also rents from the same landlord) came out and offered to assemble the compost bin I bought for his family. I had tried, but I’m much better at growing things than assembling things. That felt like a big check mark, and now I don’t need to ask David.

Anyway, back to the fruit trees. I have been reading “How to Make a Forest Garden,” which is an excellent book for anyone wanting to permaculture their yard. I guess the fruit tree purchases didn’t exactly come out of nowhere, but I really hadn’t planned to order anything until at least fall, but most likely spring. Somehow, last night, I hit upon a one night sale with free shipping and 25% off, and everything just came together so fluidly that David convinced me to go ahead with things. Mind you, I had forgotten all about Heather, so I leapt into this project assuming I’d need to do all the work myself.

The only thing I didn’t order was an Altissimo climbing rose to replace the freecycle.org rose bush that never came to life. I suspect the former owners did not remove it in the right way and let the root ball dry out, but in any case, it has acted as a placeholder for a spot that really deserves a climbing rose. None of the fruit tree or herb places had this particular kind of rose, though, so I thought I’d leave that order until next spring. My main hesitation? I dreaded having to dig out the rose bush, since it had been such a huge production to get it in the ground. We’re talking a five gallon bucket of dandelion roots, hard soil, and just generally rough digging.

Before going to bed, I asked for a sign supporting me in all these “crazy” purchases. Requests for new sessions came through in almost the same amount as I spent, but the real magick revealed itself this morning. I walked outside to find this:

rose dug up

The rose bush in question, neatly dug up! Apparently, the price for that labor was one head of a sunflower that was too shaded anyway by the trellised grape vine. I was so stunned, I immediately came into the house and told David, “I’ve seen a lot of things, and I’ve experienced a lot of synchronicities, but for some reason, this one just floors me!” Then I went back outside and found more evidence of a faery gardener in this polyculture that includes cantaloupe and basil:

basil polyculture

The cantaloupe leaves had been shading the basil, but someone or something either ate or completely removed half of the largest leaf in the way. Now the cantaloupe shades the soil, but the basil gets to reach for the sun. This was the only “damaged” leaf in that bed. The aluminum foil is a trick I learned to keep squash vine borers from boring into the vines of curcubits. So far, so good, but I’m more impressed with the spontaneous pruning of just the right leaf!

The rest of the garden continues to grow well. I learned a valuable tip this week about comfrey. It’s even more amazing than I suspected. I know that people use it as mulch and as a compost starter, as well as a nitrogen fixer in the soil. I’ve done that before, too. What I hadn’t done was use it as a repeat mulch on ailing plants. I’ve spent a ton of money and time trying to get our very poor, sandy soil into richer organic matter that can hold moisture and nutrients. If you’re not lucky enough to begin with loamy soil, then it can take years before anything good will grow well without fertilizers and soil amendments, including organic ones like I use. Anyway, rock dust, volcanic ash, various types of prepared compost, sea minerals … I’m sure it’s all helped … but guess what finally turned around the most ailing of my plants?

Comfrey!

For several days in a row, I’ve harvested huge leaves from my largest (of five) comfrey plants, placed them around “failure to thrive” plants and watered over the comfrey leaves. If I hadn’t seen it with my own eyes, I would not believe the turnaround. Now I know! Next year, the other four comfrey plants should be hardy enough to handle much more harvesting, and I’ll take root cuttings of the big one next spring. Free and on site sure beats hauling in from all over the place. I’m very happy to have all of this in process already, though.

The rest of this post includes a few selected photos of some areas of the garden:

grape vines, sunflowers, Fairy Tale Pumpkins, geraniums, calendula, cantaloupe, sea kale, cucumbers, zinnias, marigolds, onions and more ...

grape vines, sunflowers, Fairy Tale Pumpkins, geraniums, calendula, cantaloupe, sea kale, cucumbers, zinnias, marigolds, onions and more …

borage getting ready to bloom its starry blue flowers

borage getting ready to bloom its starry blue flowers

our front yard looking northeast from our driveway ... sunflowers about to bloom!

our front yard looking northeast from our driveway … sunflowers about to bloom!

I’m still shaking my head about that rose bush! Maybe I’ll wake up to pre-dug fruit tree holes, too. Thanks, Heather, and welcome back! πŸ˜‰

When Dreams “Bleed” Through

I had one of the stranger experiences of my life this morning, and that’s saying something, given my unusual life!

David’s alarm went off at 4:45 as usual, and, since we had both gone to bed early and slept through the night, I felt fully rested, too. After he got out of bed, I stretched my back a bit and fully expected to join him in the kitchen a few minutes later. The next thing I knew, I was in the middle of a lucid dream, wandering around my garden in the middle of snowy January.

At first, everything seemed similar enough to “reality” that my dream self thought I was still awake and just thinking about my garden. But then I looked more closely and noticed some unusual things. For one, we had enormous — and I mean larger than I’ve ever seen — lusciously ripe red bell peppers thriving under the snow. One looked like it had a slug on it, but when I moved to brush it off, I discovered it was actually two huge earthworms, because the soil and the garden were both teaming with fertility. Again, in the middle of snowy January.

We had spring blossoms, summer fruits and fall harvest all happening simultaneously, and it dawned on the lucid part of me, “Hey, this is the Faery Realm, where such things occur all the time, because in the Faery Realm ‘time’ works very differently than it does for humans.”

Here’s where it begins to get really strange, though:

Our bed transported outside into the Faery Realm version of our garden, surrounded by all the lush flowers and vegetation. At first, everything seemed “normal” — well, as normal as could be under the circumstances — but then I sniffed a whiff of what smelled like rotting flesh. The surrounding smells were so heady and overwhelmingly good that I almost ignored the rotten smell, but the lucid part of me started trying to figure it out.

My eyes fell upon two terra cotta pots. One had a plant in it as expected, but the other held a dead black squirrel, apparently drowned as it had tried to enter this paradise through the terra cotta pot portal. I looked around more, and found a stone slab wall like those in Ireland, but unlike anything we actually have in our “real” yard. Inside this stone slab wall, caught in a slight opening where it had tried to get through, was another dead black squirrel. In the dream, the lucid part of me said, “Remember this when you wake up. The black squirrels are important, and you’ll soon see why.”

I should note that Goshen does have these unusual black squirrels — tons of them, in fact — all descendents of one pair of black squirrels brought over from Germany. They’re very cute, but extremely aggressive, way more so than the grey, brown or partially albino squirrels we also have. In the dream, though, I knew that the black squirrels were simply the form these intruders had taken as a means of passing through the various portals. I don’t know what they were, but they weren’t black squirrels and they hadn’t intended anything good for the Faery Realm version of my garden. The faeries in my dream confirmed as much when I asked them:

“We’ve left the bodies there to show you that the portals are extremely well protected. Anything or anyone with ill intent is not welcome, and they cannot pass through the frequency of the portals. If they make it through as far as these two did, they die.” Then one of the faeries loaded my hands and arms full of fruit and sent me on my way. I had this “dream” three times, even though I wasn’t tired. I couldn’t quite get my garden bed back into the house, and until I managed to do that, it felt right to continue in this lucid dream.

I finally “awoke” just before my alarm when off a bit after 8:30. David was already gone for work, so I set about opening up the curtains and blinds. Everything seemed normal until I reached the north side living room window:

window

Unlike the rest of our slat blinds, these ones are screwed to the bottom and top of the window. I can adjust the openings of the slats, but I can’t lift the blinds. As you can see, we have some European lace in front of the blinds and then some sage colored thermal curtains that hang over the lace at night but get tied up during the day. Behind the blinds, facing outside, sits a red headed faery card — a warrior/protector from a series of paintings called The Faerie Journals, whose images mysteriously appeared in the moonlight and revealed themselves as helpers for human evolution. Even though it’s “just” a card, I always feel her strength at that window, keeping an eye on our driveway and front yard, staring out at any would-be intruders and saying, “Really? Just try me.”

This is not an easy window to get to from inside the house, since we have some objects in front of it. No living plants sit under it due to the proximity of David’s stereo, and we never bring liquids of any sort near there, again, due to the stereo and tricky accessibility of that spot. This morning, when I opened the curtains and twisted open the blinds, some kind of brownish-red splatter covered the window frame, window and blinds. It looked like someone had exploded a bottle of Coca Cola behind the curtains, except the splatter wasn’t sticky at all. We’re not talking a small splatter, either. It covered over 2/3 of the upper window and frame, plus some of the blinds themselves, and it was very cumbersome to clean without creasing or otherwise damaging the blinds!

The more I examined it, the more it looked like dried blood splatters — but not as thick or red as regular blood — more watery, with less iron. The image of the dead black squirrels crossed my mind, along with the faeries’ mysterious message: “We’ve left the bodies there to show you that the portals are extremely well protected. Anything or anyone with ill intent is not welcome, and they cannot pass through the frequency of the portals. If they make it through as far as these two did, they die.” I also remembered my lucid self saying, “Remember this when you wake up. The black squirrels are important, and you’ll soon see why.”

Did we have some kind of battle in the Faery Realm that coexists in a slightly different dimension over and through our home and garden? Did all that protection I’ve set up around our house arrest some sort of spiritual attack? Did the red headed faery make mincemeat of whoever or whatever tried to get through that north window?

I don’t know, but it was mighty strange, indeed. I’ve written and spoken before about past life “bleed-through” and Dreamtime bleed-through, but I’ve never had a dream about an attempted intrusion and then found a blood-like substance splattered around a window — or anywhere else for that matter. In any case, well done, red headed Fae, and yay, portal guardians!

Perhaps this dream also portends an enormous harvest this year. Those red bell peppers were absolutely amazing. πŸ™‚

The Faery Referral Network

Sometimes I just have to smile with an inner wink! When we moved to Goshen last year, I felt an enormous pull to get back to the Earth, nurturing the soil and healing this land on all levels. Due to the number of trees that had been cleared away during the gut rehab of our rented home, when we first relocated, this land felt traumatized. It had been the neighborhood eyesore, completely overgrown and left to Nature’s whims, but, of course, that’s how Nature Spirits like things. Even though many of the trees had been diseased and sprung up so close together as to prevent thriving, this property still had a third to a half acre of woods in one of the more industrial parts of town. Without the trees, the newly renovated house looked spiffy, but the land felt stripped and deeply sad, like it had lost its way.

I’ve chronicled my efforts to transform this neglected plot into something beautiful, productive and functional — along with little faery spats I’ve encountered along the way. Oh, how they hate that weed whacker! And yet, they learned to recognize that if I didn’t maintain the weeds within proper height, someone else would mow them to a quarter inch. Best to work with me, as I am willing to work with them. As the yard has transformed with raised beds, perennial herbs, edible ornamentals, a winter cold frame, trellises, and loads and loads of wood mulch, I’ve felt the Nature Spirits relax and begin to enjoy the space again.

We have a very faery home and yard. Even people who don’t believe in faeries notice the energy when they approach our yard and step inside our house. It’s quite palpable, and I keep meeting people around Goshen who, apparently, know me (even though I don’t know them) because they purposely drive by our yard all the time to see what kooky, “cool” new project I’ve embarked upon. “Wait until next year!” I tell them, “The edible ornamentals and landscaping have only just begun. Next year is medicinal herb year, as well as the edible front yard.” πŸ˜‰

Anyway, I work in concert with Nature Spirits, as I’ve shared many times before regarding effective protection from storms and answered requests for rain. What I haven’t shared is what I’ve come to recognize as the “Faery Referral Network,” which just cracks me up! In case it’s not obvious, I spend a lot of time gardening and cooking up Earth-friendly projects in larger Goshen. My current volunteer work is off the hook and actually more intense than my work life, which, by contrast feels quite easy. No back-breaking labor, no exposure to fluorescent lights, no need to transport myself somewhere for a meeting. Sure, I travel multi-dimensionally in my mind to read energy and share intuitive and healing insights, but in terms of physical effort, it’s far less taxing.

Nonetheless, my agreement with the Faery Realm when all of this started was that if I gave this much attention to the Earth, then they needed to manage any advertising or promotion efforts for my business. Though very specialized in skill, my paid work is what permits me the flexibility to offer all this gardening and community service where I live. I really hate marketing. It’s just not something I enjoy at all, so I turned it over to the faeries in exchange for devoted 3D side Earth healing and Faery Realm Awareness information on my blog.

Can I just say that they continually come through? I have many clients with whom I have worked off and on during my 12 years as a Medical Intuitive and Intuitive Reader and 7 years as a Life Coach. They generate referrals, too, but ever since I made this deal with the Faery Realm, I’ve been receiving a different sort of referral. People contact me for all manner of readings not because they’ve heard about Medical Intuitive Sessions or because they know someone who had a session with me. Not because they’ve read a Lyme Disease or Past Life article. Nope! I know it’s a Faery Referral Network when someone contacts me out of the blue and says they don’t even know what kind of session they want to have with me, but they love my “garden adventures” and “stories about the Nature Spirits.” At first, it kind of caught me off guard, but now it happens so regularly that it just feels natural. And so it is … because life does work that way. When we devote ourselves to a greater cause, life supports us.

I have also come to recognize that the Faery Rule, “A person’s word is bond,” really does hold true. I feel deeply connected with my friends from other realms, and time and time again, an over the top synchronicity occurs right after I’ve requested help in making a connection or finding the right supplies or support for our yard. Doors keep opening in amazing ways, even more so than my already magickal life before we moved to Goshen.

And so, I’d just like to express my gratitude to the entire Faery Realm, the Nature Spirits, Elementals, Devas, and the Tree People. I thank you with actions and offerings beyond my words. May we all continue to work together to heal this precious planet and to help those who have forgotten their connection to Mother Earth reclaim their inheritance. May we all be free under Natural Law.

Blessed Be and Blessings Share …

Faery stones

Lasagna Gardening and Fall Garden Update

It’s that time again! Most people think of Autumn as the time that gardening goes to sleep, but did you know that Fall offers a fantastic time to let Nature do (some of) next year’s garden prep for you? If this year’s fresh produce has ever had you vowing to start a garden next Spring, only to feel the enthusiasm wane when next year rolls around, now is a perfect time to lasagna garden — also known as sheet mulch. Instead of hauling away your leaves now, and then constructing a raised bed and buying expensive soil to fill it in a rush next Spring, you can use Fall’s bounty of leaves and yard waste to begin preparing and fertilizing next year’s garden.

It’s actually very easy! Just lay down a several layers of newspaper or one layer of thick cardboard over whatever area of lawn you’d like to turn into garden. If you’re using newspaper, pick a non-windy day, or make sure you have something to weight down the papers. Otherwise, you’ll just make a mess. πŸ™‚ On top of the newspaper/cardboard, start layering up natural waste: leaves, straw, unfinished compost (i.e., whatever fresh kitchen scraps or compost that hasn’t had time to rot down yet). Mix that up with some peat moss and some kind of minerals (rock dust, vermiculite, etc.), or just keep layering organic matter. Then top it off with some kind of untreated mulch. Surprise, surprise, I’m using wood mulch, as inspired by the film, Back to Eden:

mulch

Believe it or not, that’s my fifth(!) pile of wood mulch since April, and I’ve already moved half of it before taking this photo. I’ve been so happy with the wood mulch’s ability to retain water and keep weeds at bay. I’ve only watered our front herb and flower garden twice this year:

herbs

When you layer several inches or more of wood mulch on top of a lasagna garden, then everything rots down over the winter, enriching the soil. When I recently divided some of the creeping thyme out front, I found five earthworms within about four square inches of surface soil. Every time I move anything around in this wood mulched area, I find earthworms, a true sign of healthy soil, and I didn’t even lasagna garden the herb bed! I just put a layer of mulch on top of our landlord’s layer of mulch from last year. Nature did the rest. Since herbs prefer poor soil, I didn’t want to waste my time making it too rich with amendments. If you want to grow a decorative and culinary herb garden, laying down some wood mulch this Fall will get your plot ready for next Spring’s seeds or transplants.

I share many of my crazy gardening projects on this blog, because people keep telling me they enjoy the Mad Scientist Gardening experiments, but I do want to note that you can have a fantastic garden without the level of work I’ve put into our yard. We just moved into a place with a tremendously ugly, damaged, weedy, sad, neglected yard — a yard we eagerly accepted because our landlord gave us permission to do whatever we wanted with it. For me, this yard has represented a blank canvas to turn something completely overgrown and forgotten into something gorgeous and functional. It’s a creative outlet much like painting the discarded doors into potent portals. I “paint” with flowers and use plants as form, with food as the function and intention. But anyone can garden in any setting, whether on a small patio in containers, a sunny backyard plot, or turning your front yard into edible landscaping. Lasagna gardening or sheet mulching just represents one more way of enriching the soil to ensure success.

front yard

This latest batch of mulch has gone towards lasagna gardening/mulching out a huge swath of front yard, turning it into four beds with a circular path and three side paths for easy plant access. I love the energy going around the circle with my cart full of mulch! It’s quite fun and a big contrast to the straight lines and rougher look of the rest of our street. This last load included two different types of trees, so I decided to use the lighter, harder wood for the paths, and then the darker, softer wood for the top lasagna layers. I’ve planted mums at the edges of each path so that I remember the boundaries next Spring in the event that everything sinks down over the Winter.

I’ve had so much fun rereading “Edible Front Yard” now that I know something about gardening! I first read that book from the Madison Public Library back when I didn’t know anything about planting zones, soil building or microclimates. It makes sooo much more sense now, and I actually recognize many of the edible ornamentals she mentions. It’s fun to imagine how different shapes, heights and colors will combine in each of the four beds in order to create a burst of beauty that also just happens to be edible.

I didn’t get my intended roses and fruit trees planted this Fall; that will need to happen next Spring, as I’ve run out of time for the tasks I’ve already begun. I still have five raspberry bushes/canes to plant out back. Poor things, they’ve sat in pots for two seasons! Speaking of seasons, I’ve also enjoyed figuring out how to bring hints of color and beauty to the yard year round. I found Goshen quite grim last Winter, especially our street, so this year I’ve prioritized delighting my senses even in the middle of December, January and February.

Again, you can have a fabulous garden without needing to figure out all these angles. Moving into this refurbished cottage with the blank slate lawn in a forgotten corridor of Goshen was quite the artistic challenge. I’ve chosen to explode creativity all over the yard, because we’ve had nothing to lose. A more normal setup might just require a bit of creativity to keep a small front yard plot looking good enough for an HOA. I, on the other hand, am in process of shifting a mixed industrial neighborhood plot (formerly the most neglected in the entire neighborhood) into a magical faery paradise. It’s happening, and it’s what I feel called to do … but I don’t want to intimidate people with the level of work I’ve expended. Any efforts to grow even some of your own food and to beautify the world even just a tiny bit have positive ripple effects in your life and in the world. I just enjoy a challenge. πŸ™‚

winter Guarden

Thus, we have another Fall/Winter “Guarden” crop coming in, which will soon be covered by a cold frame. Planting these babies in early August resulted in lots of greens and root crops coming in now.

back yard gardens

I finally cleared out the cherry tomato plant from the InstaBed, a plant that had spread to three beds and my asparagus! I forgot we even had a gnome beneath all that fruit and foliage.

chard

We’ve also got some HUGE chard these days. Massive leaves.

back garden

You can see I still have a few “starts” to transplant. It might be too late, but no sign of frost quite yet.

amish paste

Our Amish paste tomatoes continue to grow and have, more importantly, confirmed to me the suspicion that our ground soil is low in calcium. I had heard that a) lots of dandelion flowers means low calcium soil and b) that tomato plants are excellent indicators of soil health. I did not water these with milk as often as others, because I just wanted to see what happened. Sure enough, the dreaded blossom end rot has struck some of the bigger tomatoes just before they ripen. Blossom end rot is a sign of calcium deficient soil. I’ll add lime and other amendments as I prepare various in ground/trellis beds for next year. Thank you, Nature, for confirming without a soil test. πŸ™‚ I also know that my special, secret soil treatment for organic farms will pay big dividends, since that formula’s loaded with calcium. Yay!

front bed from back

As I walked back around the yard, I caught a glimpse of the front lasagna garden from behind. Just like flower arranging in a vase, I enjoy flower and plant arranging outside in ways that please from all angles. The center bed will change dramatically this weekend as I add a mix of compost and mulch to the flowers. Instead of sunflowers there next year, I plan to have decorative alliums — very Seussian — and zinnias for butterflies, with “Evening Sun” sunflowers on the North side and this year’s Lemon Queen out back. A foretaste of next year’s edible front yard:

Evening Sun image from the seed packet

Evening Sun image from the seed packet

purple opal basil

purple kohlrabi from Seed Savers Exchange

purple kohlrabi from Seed Savers Exchange

scarlet runner beans

scarlet runner beans

cabbage

amaranth

amaranth

And, probably out back:

Mandan Bride Corn

Mandan Bride Corn

Fairy Tale Pumpkins

Fairy Tale Pumpkins

On the front trellis (with the star pictured above):

vining, non-bolting Malabar Spinach

vining, non-bolting Malabar Spinach

Can’t wait for these, some golden fennel and the rest of my medicinal herbs, too. If all goes well, I will have enriched the soil enough and mulched enough to have a relatively low-maintenance and low-water feast for the eyes, nose, mouth and belly.

Happy Gardening!

Faery Winks

I do love a good, synchronous faery wink, along with layers and layers of intertwining messages. A blog reader alerted me regarding yesterday’s post:

“Just curious if you knew that Michael Pilarski from the dandelion video [you posted] is the head of the International Fairy Congress. He started the Fairy festival in Twisp, WA years back. Perhaps your yard Fairy’s were encouraging you via Michael πŸ™‚ If I’m way off base here and being intrusive, forgive me, I felt compelled to share this info. Micheal is interviewed at the 1:50 mark”:

No intrusion! I am smiling and giggling, especially given yesterday’s message: β€œPay attention, Laura…we don’t give you and your sister a simultaneous double-whammy message to remain open-minded and then just drop the ball. Seriously, girl … we use it all. β€˜Can you hear me now?’”

Those Faeries, aka “Earth Angels,” and Nature Spirits are always sending me their merry winks. Many thanks to this reader for letting them speak through you, as well!

Laura Bruno, wild and free on Halloween 2009

Laura Bruno, wild and free on Halloween 2009