Posts Tagged ‘Elves’

Eve Goodman ~ Dacw ‘Nghariad (Welsh Folk Song)

I awoke the other night from a dream telling me that Tolkien’s Elvish was based on Welsh. In my daily deluge of synchronous gifts and delights, I’ve received some odd nudges to learn Welsh, so I decided to investigate that dream. Sure enough, Tolkien based Elvish on Welsh sounds and grammar. Well, then! I completed my first lesson today.

It’s a musical language, and of all the languages I’ve had on my potential docket, perhaps one of the least practical. On the other hand, the way my life works, I wonder what surprises learning Welsh will bring. 🙂

In any case, I find it enchanting. I hope you do, too!

Ryan Stone ~ The Secret Lives of Elves and Faeries: The Truth behind the Story of Rev Robert Kirk

Thanks to Anthony for forwarding the link to this Ancient Origins article! As I told him, I own both John Matthews’ book, The Sidhe, and the Reverend Robert Kirk “official” book, The Secret Commonwealth of Elves, Fauns, and Faeries. This article explores additional letters and stories that seem to indicate what many of us already suspected — namely, Rev. Kirk’s “myths and legends” recorded his actual experiences.

Fairies in the News

It always warms my heart when mainstream media redeems itself by reporting on the Fae. Indeed, both The Guardian and the BBC have given real coverage to a high controversy in Wayford Woods:

“Trustees say cherished elfin estate of up to 200 front doors, in Wayford woods, Crewkerne, is gobbling up too many tree trunks – and the spritely speculation must be hobbled.”

No, this is not a spoof but an actual debate about the pro’s and con’s of limiting the over-development of an elfin forest. Living in a home in which we are fast approaching the manifest destiny of portal doors, I completely understand the dilemma. After my next door arrives on March 28th, I really will need to make some adjustments, perhaps switching only to canvases lining our stairwell, since, alas, too many faery doors really can overwhelm a space! You can read two delightful, yet serious viewpoints on the doors of Wayford Woods by clicking the following titles, both from the Guardian:

Fairies’ woodland homes face planning control

Don’t do away with the fairies: we need to relearn our sense of the magical

Meanwhile, a bit closer to home, I have this faery news to report:

It’s official. Leprechauns are terrific cobblers. I mail ordered a pair of boots that arrived in January, but much to my disappointment, they were so uncomfortable on my left foot that I could barely walk for days after wearing them only a few minutes. I loved the boots (very faery and, in theory, great for snowy woods walks), but I just couldn’t wear them long enough to break them in. I tried multiple shoe inserts — gel, foam, arch support, ball support — yet the pain remained. Determined to keep these boots, I asked the faeries for help. They told me to ask a leprechaun for help, because “leprechauns are good cobblers.” I hadn’t heard this before, but upon research discovered that, yes, indeed, leprechauns have a reputation for fixing shoes! They also like to make deals (this I already knew).

True story here: a leprechaun appeared and offered to fix my boots — for a price. I asked the price, and it was an airline bottle of Irish Whiskey and seven quartz crystals. I had the crystals and left them outside, but I needed to procure some whiskey. Hey, I was desperate! David and I ran some errands in Mishawaka, and I explained my dilemma to him just as we happened to drive by a liquor store. He humored me, and we asked the clerk if he had any airline sized bottles of Irish Whiskey.

“Is Jameson alright?” he asked.

“I don’t know,” I said, looking at David. “Is Jamison ‘Irish Whiskey’?” at which point David nodded, then winked at the clerk and announced, “She’s buying it for a leprechaun!”

The clerk cracked up, and so did David, but for different reasons — the clerk because he thought it was a joke; David because he knew it wasn’t.

I got carded buying Jameson for a leprechaun!

When we got home, I placed the bottle between my boots, and the magical cobbler indicated it would take two nights. I had already placed the seven crystals outside. I left my boots alone for three nights, just in case, and I put a coin under the whiskey bottle as a tip. In all honesty, I must report that when I tried the boots on again, they no longer hurt my foot. In fact, they felt springy, and I wear them all around town now. They were fabulous for frolicking in huge snow drifts, and they make wearing skirts fun even on cold, windy days. I don’t know what the leprechaun did, but I would have to endorse his skill. In the event you ever fall in love with a pair of shoes that you simply cannot comfortably wear, you might want to inquire after leprechaun services. These boots feel extra magical now, like they squirt out pixie dust wherever I walk, and truly, I tell you, nothing else worked.

Leprechaun cobbled boots

Leprechaun cobbled boots

In even more personal news, I’ve been spending a lot of time inside with the magical portal doors, reading about faeries, the Feri Tradition, researching my novel, planning this year’s flowers, and doing this month’s special, “The Faeries’ Dream.” I snapped this photo of myself the other day, since my sweet Tania Marie had wanted to see what was going on with my crazy hair these days. I know people think I look like a faery, but this photo really caught me off guard:

Fae me

Apparently, we really do become those with whom we associate.

Tania Marie’s Epic Iceland Journey

I tried to reblog this post, and WordPress won’t let me. At over 15,000 words and so many photographs, perhaps it’s just too large to reblog. It’s too gorgeous not to share, though, so do click through if you’ve ever wanted to go to Iceland or if you just crave beauty, raw food, friendship, adventure and love.

On a personal note, Tania and I are always so linked, especially in faery or elven encounters, that while she was there, I kept dreaming of huge rock and ice landscapes with waterfalls and brilliantly colored pools, which she’d then tell me she had seen on the previous day’s journey. Synchronously, I also lost about five pounds that week, as did she with her 95-100% raw eating. My five pounds just wanted off, as my body insisted on much lighter eating that week. The funniest thing was that right after Tania and Kate Magic got stuck in the blacked out tower stairway, her phone auto-called me from Iceland. Given that Tania and I have had our own funny adventure in a tower in Chicago, we had a good giggle about mischievous Iceland elves.

Just to give you a taste of what she saw there, Tania included this video, but the Northern Lights were only part of an incredibly packed and timeless adventure. Much, much more here.

A Little Holiday Cheer…

… because there just aren’t that many days of the year when you can go full on elf!

Merry Christmas!

Merry Christmas!

Iceland !!! Thanks to R.

Thanks to Jean for posting these gorgeous photos! Is it any wonder so many people in Iceland believe in elves and consult the elves before proceeding on building and road projects? Surrounded by such stunning beauty, it is easy to see why Icelanders remember to honor sovereignty of both land and soul.

2012: What's the 'real' truth?

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Epoch Times ~ 6 Credible Elf Incidents?

Today’s post goes right along with a fascinating book I’ve been reading for the past month: “The Fairy-Faith in Celtic Countries” by W.Y. Evans-Wentz. This 1910 dissertation involves copious interviews of “old timers” living in the outskirts of Celtic countries in the early 20th century, before electricity and “civilization” wiped out most of the remaining practitioners of Fairy-Faith. As an academic endeavor, it’s quite dense and slow reading; however, Wentz’s painstaking efforts to find credible witnesses, authentic texts, and anthropological indicators definitely bring this typically “woo-woo” topic to levels of scholarly debate not normally afforded the Faery Realm. He interviews psychics, politicians, ordinary folks — many in their 80’s and 90’s even at the turn of the 20th century.

Wentz gives some brief overviews of similar beliefs, myths and legends in other cultures, but he primarily focuses on the Celtic regions. Today’s post explores my recurring topic of elves in Iceland, as well as some evidence for actual hobbits, and a civilization of “Little People” in North America. Anyway, I found the following article quite interesting. Enjoy!

6 Credible Elf Incidents?
By Daniel He, Epoch Times and Tara MacIsaac, Epoch Times | January 7, 2014

Left: An elven character in “Lord of the Rings,” Legolas as shown on a New Zealand stamp. (Shutterstock*) Right: A mummy found in the Pedro Mountains in Wyoming believed by some to be the remnants of an elf. (Wikimedia Commons) Read more: http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/427555-real-evidence-of-mythical-creatures-hobbits-video/#ixzz2q6pyT3UP Follow us: @EpochTimes on Twitter | epochtimes on Facebook

Left: An elven character in “Lord of the Rings,” Legolas as shown on a New Zealand stamp. (Shutterstock*) Right: A mummy found in the Pedro Mountains in Wyoming believed by some to be the remnants of an elf. (Wikimedia Commons)
Read more: http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/427555-real-evidence-of-mythical-creatures-hobbits-video/#ixzz2q6pyT3UP
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If you ask an Icelander whether elves exist or not, chances are he or she will say it is quite possible.

Many polls over the years have shown the majority of Icelanders believe in elves to some degree. Late last year, a judge even halted the building of a road in Iceland because it may disturb elves living in the area.

Myth often has fact as its foundation.

In 2004, the fossils of small humanoid beings were found on the remote Indonesian island of Flores. The being, named Homo floresiensis but better known as the “hobbit,” stood about three feet tall. The journal Nature explains that bones from several individuals were uncovered, showing that it was a society of people this size and not an anomaly.

So are elves more like the tall, lithe, and strong Legolas of “Lord of the Rings,” or more like Santa’s helpers who look like small children? Here are some accounts of elf encounters.

1. ‘Little People’ Legends, Mummy Found

A mummy found in the Pedro Mountains in 1932, thought to be possible evidence of the Nin’ am-bea little people of whom the local Shoshone natives spoke. (Wikimedia Commons)

A mummy found in the Pedro Mountains in 1932, thought to be possible evidence of the Nin’ am-bea little people of whom the local Shoshone natives spoke. (Wikimedia Commons)

The Cherokee native Americans spoke of Yunwi-Tsunsdi, which literally means “little people.” The Yunwi-Tsunsdi were described as kind and helpful, barely reaching the height of a man’s knee. The natives of Hawaii spoke of the Menehune, a plentiful race of little people who built cities, fished, and farmed. The Shoshone natives of Wyoming also spoke of little people, the Nin’ am-bea, whom they feared offending. The Nin’ am-bea were known to shoot people with arrows if offended.

In 1932, a mummy was found in the Pedro Mountains, close to where the Shoshone lived. It was examined by the anthropology department at Harvard University and at the American Museum of Natural History. It was originally identified as belonging to a 65-year-old man, though it is just over a foot tall.

The mummy was lost after one of its owners died. Dr. George Gill of the University of Kansas examined x-ray photographs decades later; he said the mummy was likely an infant with a birth defect that caused it to have an adult-sized skull, but remained open to other explanations.

Other people in the Pedro Mountains region have told stories of finding similar tiny mummies, as documented in books about local folklore.

2. Little People’s Burial Site in Ohio

The American Journal of Science published an account in 1837 of a strange discovery in Coshocton, Ohio: “From some remains of wood still apparent in the earth around the bones, the bodies seem all to have been deposited in coffins; and what is still more curious, is the fact that the bodies buried here were generally not more than from three to four and a half feet in length. They are very numerous, and must have been tenants of a considerable city or their numbers could not have been so great. A large number of graves have been opened, the inmates of which are all of this pigmy race. … Similar burial grounds have been found in Tennessee, and near St. Louis in Missouri.”


3. Bulldozing Operation Inexplicably Halted in Suspected Elf Habitat

In 1996, an attempt to bulldoze a hill in Kopavogur, Iceland inexplicably failed. The hill, which was to be cleared for a graveyard, was believed to be occupied by elves. During the operation, two bulldozers inexplicably malfunctioned. Television cameras malfunctioned, unable to focus on the hill.

Elf communicators were called in and apparently were able to reach an agreement with the elves. The elves decided to leave, the communicators said, and the machinery began to work again. The event was reported on by the New York Times.

Hildur Hakonardottir told the New York Times in 2005: “My daughter once asked me, ‘How do you know where elves live?’ … I told her you just know. It’s just a feeling.”

Another Icelander, Vigdís Kristín Steinthórsdóttir, expressed a similar idea in 2011 when a mining operation near her home was believed to be sabotaged by elves.

“I had been [in the mountain] before with other people who sensed the natural beings weren’t content with the disturbances to the ground and they hadn’t been asked to move. We sensed they were sad about it. I wanted for us to apologize,” she told IcelandReview.

4. Elvish Gathering in Mangrove Swamps

A file photo of a  green mangrove forest in Africa (Shutterstock) Read more: http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/427555-real-evidence-of-mythical-creatures-hobbits-video/#ixzz2q6s2nlrI Follow us: @EpochTimes on Twitter | epochtimes on Facebook

A file photo of a green mangrove forest in Africa (Shutterstock)
Read more: http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/427555-real-evidence-of-mythical-creatures-hobbits-video/#ixzz2q6s2nlrI
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Stephen Wagner has been investigating the paranormal for 30 years and has written books on the subject, including “Touched By a Miracle: True Stories of Ordinary People and Extraordinary Experiences.” In an About.com article, he tells of multiple accounts of elf encounters, including that of Paul in South Africa.

In 1986, Paul was hiking near the Mangrove Swamps Nature Reserve with a group of friends. At around 6 p.m., they came across an open space with rock formations. Paul told Wagner: “We looked around and witnessed little people sitting on the illuminated rock formations and others who were interacting with each other.”

The experience lasted about 10 seconds, and he estimated there had been 20 to 30 of these little people. Startled, Paul and his friends ran back to the car. They later returned to the same spot and found the lights and rock formations, along with the little people, were gone.

5. A Shimmery Little Person Behind a Tree

Wagner recounts another story, this one from Greenburg, Penn. In 2003, a woman whose name is only given as K.T. was walking in the woods at dusk. The area around her appeared unusually “shimmery,” as she described it.

As she rounded a bend, she came face-to-face with a little elf. It was peeking at her from behind a tree. K.T. described it: “It was almost a stereotypical elf: long, pointy ears, long funny-shaped nose, very long fingers and pointy cap. It was wearing red clothes and hat, and its skin appeared to be a very light lavender color.”

When she made an exclamation of surprise, it jerked back and disappeared.

6. An Elf Neighbor Borrowed Scissors

Let’s return to Iceland for our final account. Iceland is home to the only Elf School. Located in the capital of Iceland, Reykjavik, the Elf School is a good place to learn all the elf-related stories. The headmaster, Magnus Skarphedinsson, has spent 30 years talking to thousands of people who claim they have encountered the hidden people.

One of the stories he tells is of Elly Erlingsdottir, the head of the Hafnarfjordur town council’s planning committee. She said some elves had simply borrowed her kitchen scissors and returned them a week later. She was completely confident that this really happened, and a local mystic was often invited to communicate with elves to get their opinions before the committee made decisions.

Andri Snaer Magnason, a well-known environmentalist, spoke to the Huffington Post about the Icelandic belief in elves in relation to development decisions.

When elf advocates were saying the construction of a road from Reykjavik to the Alftanes peninsula would disturb the little people, Magnason’s major concern was that the road would destroy bird nesting sites and have other environmental impacts.

He’s a bit skeptical about elves, but he said: “I got married in a church with a God just as invisible as the elves.”

Numerous accounts beyond those recorded here have been given of encounters with little people, whether with the leprechauns of Ireland or those with other names and slightly varying forms.

Read more: http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/427555-real-evidence-of-mythical-creatures-hobbits-video/#ixzz2q6sC3wfp
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