Posts Tagged ‘Eating Weeds’

Divine Feminine, Dark Goddess and the May 20, 2012 Eclipse

These topics keep arising in sessions with clients, my own mini-downloads, and also during last night’s Raph (aka Archangel Raphael) Channeling Event in Madison, so I thought I’d share them here.

You can find loads of information about the May 20th Annular Eclipse, as people in all walks of life are writing about it and honoring it in various ways. The direct path of the eclipse runs from Mt. Fuji in Japan to Mt. Shasta in the US, with a pass over Pyramid Lake, near Reno, NV. People in these and other places are performing activations, meditations and rituals to honor the passing of the Moon in front of the Sun. This type of eclipse does not completely block out the Sun; rather, the darkness that covers the Sun becomes haloed by a “Ring of Fire.”

OK, the Johnny Cash didn’t come up in the channeling event, but I couldn’t resist. I love this song! The topic of Love did arise, though. “It burns, burns, burns … the Ring of Fire.” Think of the effects of fire. It can burn the skin, burn things down, but it also lights the way. We may see some destruction with this eclipse, but the fire of Love will destroy those illusions that needed light. The visual of the eclipse will also remind us that even if things look very dark, a halo of heavenly light surrounds them:

Annular Solar Eclipse from October 3, 2005

What keeps coming through in sessions is not so much the light, though, but the potential of the dark, specifically, the Dark Goddess energy. 3Dality presents us with a world of duality, in which we polarize light and dark. Light=good; dark=bad. White hats=good; dark hats=bad. Forget gray areas. Forget the Tao (yin-yang symbol) in which each polarity contains a spot of its opposite. 3Dality aims to polarize. Traditionally, the Sun represents the masculine side, whereas the Moon evokes more “feminine” qualities like intuition, emotions and “lunacy.” The Moon also represents our Shadow Side. Unable to emit its own light, the Moon can only reflect the Sun. We live in a culture so afraid of the dark, that our internal Shadows have grown into major monsters in the form of false flag events, global economic collapse, martial law and any other boogie men fears growing on the periphery: death, destruction, the occult, conspiracies, eeeeeee-vil. In our fear of things murky or unseen, we have turned away instead of turning inside.

We have forgotten our roots, which, coincidentally, grow well in dark dirt or rotting compost. Roots reach down into the darkness and manage to extract exactly what they need — water, minerals, a firm anchor. Plants need sunlight and roots. If the roots dry out, or fail to establish themselves deeply enough, then a rainstorm or drought can easily destroy the plant. Most weeds grow very deep roots, one of the factors that makes them so difficult to eradicate. Like ’em or not, weeds replenish the soil by pulling nutrients to the surface from far below. They grow strong through this process, far stronger than the unnatural monocrops we call “lawns.” What makes something a weed, though? Doesn’t it depend on perspective?

Stinging nettle will burn, burn, burn if you disrespect her, but last year, I actually invited nettles into our yard, giving them prime location in a raised bed out back. They nourish our garden bed and provide us with fast growing, mineral-rich leaves for smoothies. Nettles remind me of the Dark Goddess energy. Tonight, David and I will attend our second annual Wild Edibles Gourmet Dinner at the Wildwood Institute. I always remember herbalist Kathleen Wildwood saying, “Nettles like to be noticed.” If you acknowledge and respect the nettles in your midst, you will rarely, if ever get stung. You can also crush the leaves and use their juice as a antidote for the sting — if you dare. Most people, once stung by nettle want to get as far away as possible, not realizing that the cure for the pain comes from embracing the nettle even more closely. If you avoid the nettle’s juice, the ring of fire on your skin may last for days.

With the highly honored place in our yard, our nettles have no need to thrust themselves into walkways or woody paths, unlike those I’ve noticed in places where people ignore them as ugly weeds. I’ve seen stinging nettles create prickly, burning barriers right along public trails, practically screaming at passersby, “I am here, and you will notice me, even if I need to sting you so bad you never forget me again.” Dark Goddess energy functions much the same way. Ignore the Dark Goddess at your own risk; she likes to be noticed, demands respect and will sting at seemingly inopportune times if you continue to trample her or keep her on the periphery. Honor her, and she will shower you with unexpected gifts.

“When in doubt, use nettles.” This herbal maxim reminds us that nettles can improve just about any physical condition, from bladder issues to mineral deficiencies, poor blood to hair loss, detoxification to tooth health. Kathleen Wildwood compared the benefits of nettles to spirulina and other blue gren algae “superfoods,” making note that yes, the blue green algae do all these wonderful things, but when you get down to it, “You’re eating pond scum.” I’ve got nothing against pond scum, by the way. It’s another Dark Goddess gift from the murky shadows at which we tend to wrinkle our noses. I mention things like pond scum and algae in connection with the Dark Goddess energy, because all of these offer enormous gifts if we can humble ourselves to accept them. (Word count at that sentence kept hovering on 911. Hmmmmm. Speaking of false flags bringing gifts … ) The Dark Goddess energy rules decay, destruction and darkness, but if we can bring ourselves to value those things, we can experience their benefits instead of just their pain and trauma.

If we consciously cultivate the rejected qualities, then we can work with the Dark Goddess, nettles, weeds and pond scum in order to heal ourselves and our world. The May 20, 2012 Annular Eclipse offers such an opportunity, and I’m happy so many people feel the pull to honor this moment. Not only will we get flooded with love and photons from the Pleiades’ Alcyone as it directly aligns with Earth and our Sun, but we will also feel this alignment in context of the Dark Goddess energies temporarily obscuring Earth’s patriarchal solar paradigm. Will we notice and respect the darker aspects of ourselves? Will we honor the power that comes from digging deeper than we ever imagined possible? Will we accept the gifts of our Shadow Side? As you ponder these questions, I will leave you with wise words I found in an article called “Charge of the Dark Goddess”:

“Wisdom and empowerment are the gifts of the Dark Goddess of Transformation.

She is known to us as Kali, Hecate, Cerridwen, Lilith,
Persephone, Fata, Morgana, Ereshkigal, Arianhrod, Durga,
Inanna, Tiamat, The Morrigan, and by a million, million other names:

Hear me child, and know Me for who I am. I have been with you
since you were born, and I will stay with you until you return to Me
at the final dusk.

I am the passionate and seductive lover who inspires the poet to dream.

I am the One who calls to you at the end of your journey.
After the day is done,
My children find their blessed rest in my embrace.

I am the womb from which all things are born.

I am the shadowy, still tomb; all things must come to Me and bare their breasts to die and be reborn to the Whole.

I am the Sorceress that will not be ruled, the Weaver of Time, the Teacher of Mysteries. I snip the threads that bring my children home to me. I slit the throats of the cruel and drink the blood of the heartless. Swallow your fear and come to me, and you will discover true beauty, strength, and courage.

I am the fury which rips the flesh from injustice.

I am the glowing forge that transforms your inner demons into tools of power. Open yourself to my embrace and overcome.

I am the glinting sword that protects you from harm.

I am the crucible in which all the aspects of yourself merge together in a rainbow of union.

I am the velvet depths of the night sky, the swirling mists of midnight,
shrouded in mystery. I am the chrysalis in which you will face that which terrifies you and from which you will blossom forth, vibrant and renewed.

Seek me at the crossroads, and you shall be transformed, for once you look upon my face, there is no return.

I am the fire that kisses the shackles away.

I am the cauldron in which all opposites grow to know each other in Truth. I am the web which connects all things.

I am the Healer of all wounds, the Warrior who rights all wrongs in their Time. I make the weak strong. I make the arrogant humble. I raise up the oppressed and empower the disenfranchised. I am Justice tempered with Mercy.

Most importantly, child, I am you. I am part of you, and I am within you. Seek me within and without, and you will be strong. Know me. Venture into the dark so that you may awaken to Balance, Illumination, and Wholeness.

Take my Love with you everywhere and find the Power within to be who you wish.”

Author Unknown

Wishing you a powerful eclipse and transmutation! Blessed be.

Wild Foraging and Weeds: Why Wild Things Make My Heart Sing

Anyone who follows me on Facebook, walks in the woods (or anywhere!) with me, peruses titles on my growing stack of library books, or visits our backyard may possibly have noticed a teeny tiny obsession with all things wild. This is not something new, but it has most definitely intensified since October 2010, when I took an Urban Foraging Class on my first visit to Madison. In years past, I delighted in dandelions, lambs quarters, nettles and purslane, with the occasional sorrel mixed in for good measure. My friend Cecilia showed me a wild strawberry bush and fig tree in Petaluma, and we spent some blissful times gorging ourselves on Nature’s bounty. Perhaps it’s the faery in me, but I’ve always loved weeds, especially clover that attracts honey bees and Leprechauns … as well as forget-me-nots and all things foresty.

In addition to the woods, medicinal herbs have also held a space close to my heart, especially since I first began my Medical Intuitive practice while doing an apprentice trade with a Seattle herbalist of 50+ years (no longer practicing). In exchange for me “reading” his clients, he taught me what he knew about Chinese, Ayurvedic and Native American Herbal Remedies. We both learned lots and his clients benefited from our joint efforts. In my pre-“I not only believe in past lives, but I offer past life readings” days, he would assure me that I must have spent many lifetimes working as a healer because I seemed to just “know” all the remedies. I’ve gradually learned more on a conscious level, and I’ve obviously gotten over my reluctance to attribute any past life infiltration of knowledge! Still, one thing I missed in working with him was the experience of actual plants. All the herbs he used arrived as powders. The most I interacted with them was by taking them internally or counting capsules for his clients. I appreciated the ways he helped me heal from my brain injury, along with the training, but part of me longed to connect with the plants themselves.

Fast forward ten years: living in a house in eco-friendly Madison has provided me with a yard, unsprayed bike trails, and a community of people interested in permaculture, organic gardening and wild food foraging. I’ve since attended another urban foraging class, as well as a Wild Edibles Dinner, hosted by Kathleen Wildwood of Wildwood Institute. The gourmet, multi-course meal was foraged and prepared by the owners of Moonwise Herbs, and it truly inspired me with more community, delicious, deeply nourishing food, and a greater appreciation of the abundance all around us.

As a Lazy Raw Foodist and newbie gardener, I love so many things about wild foods! For one thing, they grow without effort. Instead of weeding the garden, watering the soil, and carefully fertilizing seedlings, you can just let the weeds have at it. I find this comforting, as I watch how slowly my cultivated seedlings have sprouted and begun to grow, in vast contrast to the abundance and fast spurts of dandelions, lambs quarters and wild violets. Our backyard came with lots of bulb plants like hostas and lillies, but I’ve also found wood nettles, bee balm, garlic mustard (great for pesto!), what appears to be plantain, clover, creeping Jenny, wild lettuces, a transplanted stinging nettle, ferns (for fiddleheads), various now potted mints, and some possibly edible leeks. We also inherited three raspberry bushes, two elderberry trees, and some burdock from a permaculture enthusiast who needed to trim back her bounty. These all look happy and vibrant among my kale, chard, chives, strawberries, herbs, nasturtiums and marigolds.

Much happier than my poor tomato plants! Dear me, if I based my gardening experience on the joy of some of the trickier specimens, I’d feel so discouraged that I just might quit. Instead, the weeds provide wonderful greens for smoothies and salads, as well as “proof” that our tiny, unplanned yard can provide abudant produce. If I expand my “garden” outward to include nearby bike paths, I find Juneberry trees, more elderberry, giant dandelions, large burdock and cattails, which I have yet to try. I hear that cattails offer all parts as edibles during various points of the year, but still want some help identifying which parts to harvest when. Our landlord, who lives behind us, also offered his crabapple trees and cherry tree during harvest time. These produce much more than birds and the nearby humans can handle without canning, freezing or dehydrating. Supposedly the crabapples make an excellent cider, and I’m happy to experiment when the time comes.

The Wild Edibles Dinner featured a dessert made from Japanese Knotweed berries, which some of you may recognize as a primary ingredient in Resveratrol supplements. Indeed, David Wolfe has mentioned Japanese Knotweed as a major immune system support for people suffering from Lyme Disease, and I used these to help my ex-husband recover from his Advanced Stage Lyme. There’s a saying among herbalists that Nature provides whatever you need nearby, so I find it interesting that Japanese Knotweed has become a massively invasive species in Wisconsin, where Lyme Disease also runs rampant. I’ve heard the same thing about teasel root growing fast in Oregon and other areas with a LD issue. I don’t have LD, but I must say, that Japanese Knotweed crisp rocked! So much so that I’m going to call the folks trying to eradicate it from a nearby park to see if I can harvest the unsprayed berries.

I love how Nature seems to “know” exactly what issue someone has and synchronously provide just the plants necessary for healing. Anyone who reads this blog knows that I consider humanity to be in a crisis state right now. From government to corporate to environmental abuses to the restriction of all herbs in the EU, we need to wake up and shift! Planet Earth does not require humanity for her survival. In addition to taste and medicinal properties, I love the resilient and unstoppable qualities of weeds. We are what we eat, and we could do much worse than weeds. In fact, weeds balance disturbed or unhealthy ecosystems. Things like dandelion, comfrey and burdock grow extremely deep roots, drawing minerals up to renourish depleted soil. Weeds spring up when the Earth needs healing. By eating more weeds, we can become, on a cellular level, Earth healers. By eating wild things, we become wild, too — more easily able to free ourselves from outmoded societal conditioning that destroys communities and our sense of connection with each other and our environment.

Harvesting local foods frees us from dependence on oil and the transportation system used to bring us the produce we take for granted. It also frees us from having to pay for food. Although I have plenty of money to buy groceries, I recognize BigBanks, BigOil, BigAg and BigPharma as major culprits in all things wrong with our world right now. I would love to live completely outside the system, and I keep researching ways to increase my own independence (and interdependence with more preferable groups). In the meantime, collecting weeds, wild foraging for edibles and seeding easy-to-grow organic plants at home, brings me step-by-step closer to greater harmony with the Earth and my own Nature-loving soul. Learning how to survive on wild items also lets me relax about potential world food shortages caused by poor weather conditions, disasters or disruption of food transportation.

I’m nowhere near my final goals, but I begin each morning marveling at the abundance and beauty all around me. I find it fun. The spunky part of me who’s familiar with Codex Alimentarius and Agenda 21 also gets excited to think of myself like a weed. In a world where governments at best fail to protect their citizens and at worst are actively creating weather, environmental and pharmaceutical conditions to destroy, starve or poison large portions of the population, eating weeds and wild things is my way of celebrating strength and life. Just TRY to eradicate dandelions! Just try to get rid of wild violets and garlic mustard. Even with the most intense chemicals and poor conditions, new ones will no doubt pop up. I have lambsquarters growing in my patio cracks! Feeling that resilience and expansion in myself makes me giggle. I also feel deeply nourished and joyful.

If you decide to forage, I strongly suggest connecting with experienced people in your area. You’ll also want to make sure the no one sprays or pollutes the plants you’d like to eat, and identification does matter. You’ll want to learn the key differences between wild edibles and poisonous lookalikes. If in doubt, don’t eat it! Personally, I find the learning curve exciting. Yes, it takes up a lot of my current time and energy, but I consider the process both recreational and restorative. In a world of change, those who cling to the old may perish, but those who adapt, thrive. I intend to flourish, regardless of circumstances, and I feel ever so grateful for the challenges that brought me more in tune with Earth and some beautiful humans and animals on this planet.