Posts Tagged ‘Cancer Healing’

Two Questions for Doctors — And Congress

I sent this as a private email to my dad today, since he’s needing to evaluate some recommended treatments. Even with my own dad, I am not diagnosing or prescribing — just encouraging him to keep his eyes, ears and Spidey senses open. I thought my comments were worth sharing here, too, with a little addendum at the end:

On the rare occasions I was allowed into one of [my very health-challenged ex’s] doctor’s appointments, I would invariably ask two questions after the doctors had had their say:

1) If this were you, would you pursue this same diagnosis and treatment?

2) If this were your spouse, would you pursue this same diagnosis and course of treatment?

The squirming, lack of eye contact and question dodging were usually quite telling. Every once in awhile, a doctor would look me in the eye and say, “Well, if it were me, I would get acupuncture” or “Well, if it were my spouse, I would do what YOU are suggesting, but I’m not allowed to suggest that to a patient.” Usually, they would just mumble about how those questions were completely irrelevant.

On the contrary, I found the questions ever so instructional! If someone answered yes, I would ask them to tell me why they would choose this particular treatment or diagnosis over all the others available, making sure to ask them if they knew of the variety of other options and how much they had studied those other areas to see if they actually knew what they were talking about.

Not surprisingly, I was usually not allowed in my [then husband’s] appointments, but I was always very polite. 🙂 At least one doctor in Reno and one in Monterey changed their definitions of and treatment of Lyme Disease based in large part on our conversations. One doctor in San Francisco admitted to me that he would not pursue traditional medicine at all and in fact, only uses TCM/acupuncture for his own and his wife’s health issues. I understand that a large percentage of surveyed oncologists would refuse chemo themselves.

Anyway … in your decisions you might want to ask your various doctors recommending certain courses of action what they would choose for themselves as well as for their spouses. Then watch their body language, listen to tone of voice and see if they make eye contact if they’re still trying to sell a particular item –because, unfortunately, sales are a factor. Chemo drugs are very, very expensive, and many doctors get major kickbacks in terms of bonuses, grants, and other perks based on what level of drugs they prescribe. This is not me being paranoid. It’s quite well-documented if you look for the information. I also heard it straight from the pharmaceutical rep’s mouths when I knew sales people from Merck and straight from the MD’s at the Lyme conference I spoke at in January 2011.

Cancer and drugs are big, big business.

Along the same line of questioning, one might ask Congress if they would engage in the same “care” offered in the body-sovereignty crushing “Affordable” “Care” Act. Of course, they have kindly saved us the trouble of asking that question by quietly exempting themselves from Obamacare. The IRS — who will be enforcing this “health” “care” is arguing for an exemption, too. Sometimes silence is deafening, even in a torrent of rhetoric and sales pitches. Sometimes hypocrisy screams so loud you wonder how the whole world isn’t suffering from tinnitus!

Whenever anyone — doctor, priest, armed FDA agent, mandatory vaccine pusher, or Congressional critter — insists he or she knows what’s best for you and your body, take a moment to ask if he or she would willingly accept the route they want to impose on you. Maybe they will, but often they won’t.

Even if they would follow the imposing protocol, that still doesn’t mean they know what’s best for you. It might just mean they’re stupid, brainwashed or mis-educated. When I spoke with some lovely state representatives in Wisconsin back in 2011, they didn’t even know what a GMO was, and they thought people who wanted to drink raw milk would be buying it from factory farms! Um, ewwwwww! No crossover market there: it’s vegan or organic raw dairy from small farms. I gave them a little education of my own, all about accepted pus levels, factory farm conditions, antibiotics and Frankenfoods. Let’s just say, many of them pushed away their snacks during the course of our conversation. I don’t know if it ultimately changed their votes, though. Lobbies work hard for their corporate money, providing free “education” and perks to lawmakers, just like BigPharma reps do for doctors … just like all those Rockefeller grant regulations do for Med Schools.

Personally, I trust myself and my own body’s wisdom far more than a corporation, government or system that only profits from me being sick, weak and too brainwashed to fight back. There’s a time and a place for everything, including Western Medicine. I just personally do my best to ensure that I’m far, far away from that time and place.

Happy Love Day!

Wishing everyone the biggest heart-filled, cup overfloweth, explosively positive day of Agápe, Éros, Philia, and Storge. One of my most memorable college lectures was given by Professor Bart D. Ehrman, who has since gone on to NYT Bestseller fame (“Misquoting Jesus,” “God’s Problem,” and “Jesus Interrupted”). He took a special moment in our giant lecture hall to spellbind us with descriptions of all the different types of love and how, if we were lucky, we would find that in our significant other. He then went on to give a glowing and tear worthy description of his wife. I never forgot that lecture, though I’ve since lost my notes. Wikipedia to the rescue:

Agápe (ἀγάπη agápē[1]) means “love” (unconditional love) in modern day Greek, such as in the term s’agapo (Σ’αγαπώ), which means “I love you”. In Ancient Greek, it often refers to a general affection or deeper sense of “true love” rather than the attraction suggested by “eros”. Agape is used in the biblical passage known as the “love chapter”, 1 Corinthians 13, and is described there and throughout the New Testament as sacrificial love. Agape is also used in ancient texts to denote feelings for a good meal, one’s children, and the feelings for a spouse. It can also be described as the feeling of being content or holding one in high regard. Agape was appropriated by Christians for use to express the unconditional love of God. Before agape love there was no other word to express such great love.

Éros (ἔρως érōs[2]) is passionate love, with sensual desire and longing. The Modern Greek word “erotas” means “intimate love;” however, eros does not have to be sexual in nature. Eros can be interpreted as a love for someone whom you love more than the philia, love of friendship. It can also apply to dating relationships as well as marriage. Plato refined his own definition: Although eros is initially felt for a person, with contemplation it becomes an appreciation of the beauty within that person, or even becomes appreciation of beauty itself. Plato does not talk of physical attraction as a necessary part of love, hence the use of the word platonic to mean, “without physical attraction.” In the Symposium, the most famous ancient work on the subject, Plato has the middle-aged Athenian philosopher, Socrates argue to aristocratic intellectuals and a young male acolyte in sexual pursuit of him, that eros helps the soul recall knowledge of beauty, and contributes to an understanding of spiritual truth, the ideal “Form” of youthful beauty that leads us humans to feel erotic desire — thus suggesting that even that sensually-based love aspires to the non-corporeal, spiritual plane of existence; that is, finding its truth, just like finding any truth, leads to transcendence. Lovers and philosophers are all inspired to seek truth through the means of eros.”

Philia (φιλία philía[3]) means friendship or affectionate love in modern Greek. It is a dispassionate virtuous love, a concept developed by Aristotle. It includes loyalty to friends, family, and community, and requires virtue, equality and familiarity. In ancient texts, philos denoted a general type of love, used for love between family, between friends, a desire or enjoyment of an activity, as well as between lovers.

Storge (στοργή storgē[4]) means “affection” in ancient and modern Greek. It is natural affection, like that felt by parents for offspring. Rarely used in ancient works, and then almost exclusively as a descriptor of relationships within the family. It is also known to express mere acceptance or putting up with situations, as in “loving” the tyrant.

I feel blessed to have so many forms of love in so many areas of life. I truly feel like the Ten of Cups every single day. Yesterday, shortly after I posted photos from Grandma Van’s 100th Birthday Party, the DVD of party photos arrived in the mail. In honor of Valentine’s Day and all the love in my life, I thought I’d share a few other favorites here:

With David

Me with my Sis, Bro and one of my nephews (the other arrived moments later)

The "Crazy" Extended Family Shot

More Mama Love

My dad’s shy, so I’ve not included any public photos of him except in the group shot. He actually looks great! You’d never know he’s been battling cancer the past six months. In fact, his spiritual transformation has been so great that he was one of the most radiant, joyful people in the room. He’s still got a lot of hair, and his aura was so shiny that when I first saw him I thought he looked 10 years younger. In any case, I love my family, and I love David. So grateful to have made this journey home!

Happy Valentine’s Day and lots and lots of love to all of you on this special day of love!