Posts Tagged ‘Bees’

A Scarab Dream, Leap Year, and Synchronous Bugs

My dreams continue their heightened symbols and messages. Last night I awoke from one with the phrase “Venus Square Pluto” in my head. I assumed it meant something from a natal chart, synastry or transit, but I got up and did as I always do when I awake with a particular phrase. I ran an online search and opened the first link. Almost every time I do that, the first link features key information that answers a question or underscores an earlier message.

In this case, the first link said, “Venus Square Pluto February 28, 2020.” I’ve had a number of recent dreams and synchronicities around “leap,” “Leap Year Day” and February 29, 2020. Having a phrase link to a date within 24 hours of that timeframe jumped out at me as a major synchronicity.

I fell back asleep and dreamed a convoluted, highly coded dream that featured symbols specific to me and possibly related to the first dream’s date. At the very end of that dream, a huge scarab beetle superimposed itself onto my dream “screen.” It looked like a movie where the camera zooms in on just one image for effect. Knowing that Carl Jung coined the phrase “synchronicity” after the appearance of a scarab beetle that echoed the scarab jewelry in a client’s just-described dream, this scarab beetle zoom seemed like an announcement: “Pay attention! Synchronicity is in effect.”

I wrote up both dreams in my dream journal and then continued to ponder implications in my regular journal. When I began journaling, I noticed a stinkbug creeping along the line between wall and ceiling. Michigan has a stinkbug infestation, and we get stinkbugs in our house sometimes. They like to come in through our fireplace. When they get low enough, I catch them with a plastic cup and piece of manila folder, then send them flying outside. They’re annoying, but harmless, just creeping along.

At one point, I listed several questions in my journal, kind of asking for confirmation of my interpretation. Just at that moment, the stinkbug dropped to the ground. I thought, “Mr. Stinkbug, you’ve made this rather easy,” and caught him in the cup. He didn’t move at all, and I thought he might have dropped dead at that very moment. I threw him outside. Instead of flying away, he plopped on his back in the snow.

Odd. Stinkbugs and scarabs are both types of beetles.

I continued journaling, then looked up various symbols in my dream. At some point, I thought to reblog a post today, not knowing which one. I typed in “leap year” and the following post came up: “Happy (Quantum) Leap Year!” I originally blogged it on February 29, 2012 and reblogged it on February 5, 2014. That means I can’t reblog it again, but when I reread the post, it seemed oddly related to today’s dreams and sync’s. More bugs — in this case bees, an infinity symbol, Runes, as well as more death and life imagery. My dreams, visions and synchronicities continue to feature a theme of Life in Death — a theme that seems highly charged and related to the ongoing close conjunction of Saturn and Pluto. I had completely forgotten about this potent dream. Here’s the original post from Leap Year Day 2012:

Happy Quantum Leap Year!

I awoke this morning from a dream in which I identified the Hagalaz Rune to a former college professor of mine. He had begun to show me his latest research, found in a rare book with an ornate Hagalaz on the left page and a “picture” of an infinity sign made of bees on the other side. I put picture in quotes, because the bees buzzed around, keeping the infinity sign in living, breathing motion. “That’s Hagalaz!” I said to the professor, “Do you know what that means?!” I stared, transfixed by the bees, watching how their energy engaged the Rune, making it, too, seem to dance upon the page. Continue reading

Garden Update ~ Tulips, Trillium, Trout Lilies, and Trees

More blooms from the ever evolving yard! Today’s flowers celebrate the letter “T,” and represent just a small smattering of bee and butterfly delight. Yes, some hungry pollinators have already found our yard. In addition to the wild trillium I saved from a destroyed woods a few years ago, we’ve also got trout lilies from the same woods, along with still massive amounts of dandelions, plantain and wild violet, courtesy of Nature herself. I thought I’d share some of today’s more stunning displays:

IMG_0977

Behind those peachy beauties, you can see the later blooming magenta yarrow, which has become its own tough competitor in the colorful riot to dominate this permaculture haven. Continue reading

The Upside of Slumlord Beekeeping

A side note on the pear theft mentioned in the last post: I originally had contacted the Deva of our yard about the theft and was informed that it was really about not planting the apricot tree up front, not so much due to possible theft, but due to possible soil contamination from nearby cars parking on bare soil not that far away. According to the Deva of the yard, the theft of 100% of tree fruit was unlikely to occur again, since it was really about the apricot tree. While part of me buys that, the other part of me that somehow trusts wasps, yellow jackets and Mason bees more than the Deva of our yard — as if speaking with any of those is “normal” — called in the new residents just in case.

This afternoon I went outside and watched the new bees and wasps fill their holes, bit by bit. It’s really quite amazing to watch them work, and the number of honey bees and Mason bees in this part of the garden has also radically amplified. It’s like my call for wasps or other stingers or stinger lookalikes acted like a beacon to the whole area. Bees that gorged themselves on the thyme up front suddenly discovered the borage out back.

All’s buzzin’ along now, and hopefully, I heard the yard Deva right. I’d prefer to give away produce and chat with people walking by the yard, answering their garden questions and helping them set up their own sanctuaries. No need for lurkers and thieves. Meanwhile the pollinators have increased big time, and I feel like between the Deva and the new kids on the block, all has returned to balance. Sometimes you need to draw an energetic boundary so that a healthier one can take its place.

Blessed Bee.

The Transformative Power of Art and Story

I first noticed this video posted somewhere a few weeks ago right before I began an afternoon of back-to-back sessions. Although I planned to watch it afterwards, life intervened with other things to do, and I eventually forgot about. Many thanks to Mitch for bringing this beautiful project back on my radar when I do have time to post it myself.

I love so many things about the Beehive Design Collective that I don’t even know where to begin. As Mitch says, “It’s faery approved,” and so it is — from the bees to the art to the stories to loving protection of the Earth from BigAg. It also demonstrates how we can work together without some top down corporate globalist enterprise forcing us to do so. When we as individuals choose to respect other individuals, to listen to them, to find common local ground, we can work so well together that no one needs to be the star. Each person’s talents reveal themselves, and each heart fuels whatever projects drive it. From local we can join together with other localities, creating organic, global action.

When such organic local action grows into global action through creative acts, a special power ignites, which completely engulfs and burns through the fascist, mechanistic, uniformity of forced globalization. When we carefully, lovingly infuse specific intentions into creative projects — whether art, song, story or food — that creative process amplifies those intentions into something more. The whole becomes far more than the sum of its parts. Magick builds and explodes from the pure intentions that demand such focused concentration in order to express themselves. This is sacred creation of the highest sort, and we can each find ways to offer our own creative skills and power to honor this Earth back into her natural state, and to respect each person, animal and element as an integral part of a larger Creation.

Showers of Blessings on their Kickstarter Campaign, which you can find and fund here.

TDG ~ Telling the Bees

When David’s sister sent me this story yesterday, I immediately felt called to share it here. I was running out the door to give a presentation, though, so I made a mental note to post for later. While waiting on the porch for my ride, two notifications came through from a blog called “The Bees Knees,” linking to two pages on my own blog. Not only did “The Bees Knees” seem like a message, but the post itself was unusual even for that blogger: “I normally read Tyberonn’s posts on Spirit Library, but this is a link to Laura Bruno’s Blog (27 October article) that has this wonderful affirmation.”

OK, bees, you’ve got my attention, and I am now keeping my word by sharing the article and link back to the original. Formatting also appears as it does on the original post.

Telling the Bees
posted by Shadows

Bees figure largely in folklore although these days people are mostly uninterested in the old stories of how bees are an important part of our society.
The Egyptian Sun God Ra was supposed to create bees and humans from his tears.
In the Scottish Highlands you could go and ask the bees what the Druids knew because the bees knew everything.
Country folk had a deep respect for bees, recognising that without them there would be no life as no flower would be pollinated to create seed for life to continue.
The respect for bees continued for thousands of years, and as recently as the death of George V1 of England it was reported that beekeepers went, scarf on head for respect to inform the bees of his death.
Because Telling the Bees was the most important act of all.

I started keeping bees about 25 years ago and knew nothing about it, but that didn’t halt my enthusiasm.
Shortly thereafter I read in an old folklore book about Telling the Bees.This means that you must tell the bees the significant events, births deaths and marriages that occur within the family or suffer a consequence when the bees become hurt by neglect.
I didn’t take it seriously, but remember very well when on returning from my mother’s funeral I found my bees had swarmed and the hives were empty.

A friend gave me more bees,( You must not buy them according to folklore),and I set up the hives again, and this time the father of another friend came to rob the hives for me.
We continued this practice for some years because he had excellent equipment for robbing the hives and we traded wax and honey and queens with each other.
Then he became ill and over a period of a few months his health deteriorated and he died.I was very shocked at his death and busied myself with my friend preparing for his funeral.
A day after the funeral I found my hives empty again, the bees had swarmed.

The husband of another friend came to help and he became my bee-partner for a couple of years and then died suddenly in his sleep.
I had now read that as well as informing bees of deaths and births in the family, the beekeeper was also very important to them and they would be devastated if they did not hear of his death.
I decided I would tell them but time got away from me and a couple of days after the funeral I found all my bees in a swarm on the fence post.I lost them.

By now I was convinced that there there is a definite connection between everything that is alive on this earth and we must treat the bees with the respect they deserve as the bringers of life.

But what happened next convinced me like nothing else ever could.
A dear friend lost her 3yr old son very suddenly from a deadly virus and the family was distraught, specially the 5yr old sister of the little boy.
It was a tragic funeral with people weeping and the coffin covered with flowers,the family of the child stunned with grief.

Suddenly as the service was coming to an end a bee flew into the church.It flew to the coffin placed in full view of the mourners in the church.
For a couple of minutes it buzzed around the flowers, and the mourners, one by one, focused their attention on it.
Everyone watched as the bee made larger circles and then slowly, very slowly, flew over to the bereaved family.
It circled the heads of the three family members and hovered for a couple of seconds over the young girl’s head.
She looked up at it unafraid and it flew to about a foot beyond her face and hovered again.
She watched it happen as if hypnotised.The bee then flew out of the church.

Some cultures in olden days said that bees were a young person’s soul and they flew from the mouth of the deceased upon his death.
All cultures treated them with respect and awe and in some cases worshipped them.
I know I love bees and miss them now I no longer live in the country.

One wonders though what JK Rowling was thinking when she named the Headmaster of Hogwarts, Dumbledore.
Dumbledore is an old English name for a bee.