Author Archive

To The Mountain!

So lovely! Happy Lughnasa Weekend, Colette and all who celebrate this first harvest festival. I stopped FaceBook in December 2011 and Twitter in 2009 and still have a beautiful online community of my own choosing and loving. However you feel led to engage with the world and its news, do remember that Nature is the great healer. Enjoy the bounty and the beauty — offered to all of us from the Heart of the Mother, the Strength of the Water, and the Light of the Sun. Big blessings!

Bealtaine Cottage

DSC01770I’ve been spending much of this week catching up with a great many tasks that were backing up around me…cork-tiling the bathroom floor and part of the Lodge floor, clearing the tunnel for the winter crops and all the usual stuff such as clearing and mowing the paths in the gardens!

DSC01861I have got a lot done because I made the decision last week to come off Facebook…and have shared my thoughts with you on this…

DSC01860I posted a number of pics on FB this morning, as so many people delight in seeing Bealtaine Cottage!

DSC01859It is, however, almost impossible to respond to comments left on FB as I simply do not have the time and am resolved not to negate my commitment to this blog and the second website at bealtainecottage.org

DSC01853Those of you who have followed this blog for any amount of time will be aware of the…

View original post 499 more words

Manifestation Discernment

Exactly! I always tell people who can’t decide between A or B that they need to imagine a C thru Z. We don’t live in an either/or world, unless we insist on it. Manifesting something in no way obligates you to accept that manifestation of something feels off. Go back to the drawing board. Perhaps literally. Make a mind map; do some active daydreaming. Assess what you love about A or B and what feels less than optimal, then get creative. In a world of all possibilities… Some things are stepping stones, and some are warnings. Some are the real deal. Integrating left and right brain, mind, body, and soul helps you to know when you’re selling yourself short. You don’t need to know the how …just allow yourself to imagine a taste of the optimal what.

Thx, T! ❤️❤️❤️

Tania Marie's Blog

Just because you manifest an opportunity, doesn’t mean you have to take it, especially if it doesn’t match your integrity fully or your own needs.

Each manifestation is an opportunity to learn to refine your skills and clarify your vision in mirror to your trueness.

So, if you have to still struggle, force, manipulate, and become frustrated with it, or it just doesn’t still feel fully right, then chances are it’s a nicely wrapped package, but the contents still aren’t in alignment.

This is a good sign your manifesting skills are at work and they just need a little more tweaking in terms of connecting with your core needs.

Remember, it’s both important to be giving and receiving in balance.

So, go back to focusing on the “essence” of what you want to manifest and support yourself with belief and value so you can be a clear voice that will…

View original post 35 more words

Garden Pretties and Yummies

Some recent rains in this very dry summer have the garden looking lush and producing well! Below you can see one of the newer “neighborhoods” planted this year, including one of nine hazelnut trees, a gooseberry bush, three hostas, nasturtiums, kalette, kale, comfrey, calendula, zephirine rose, and blackeyed peas. The dead looking matter around the base of the hazel is cut down comfrey, which adds nutrients back to the soil to help this tree thrive:

New hazel and gooseberry bed.jpg

This area was originally a mass of tree stumps and so many dandelions that it was constantly going to seed. In 2014, I put out large swaths of landscape cloth and covered it with mulch. The only thing growing there was my old garden tower, but as the mulch and repeated layers of mulch broke down, I noticed extremely dark, rich soil there. Not planting anything seemed like a waste of good yard space, plus I have a view of that area from my writing office.

The difference in growth between this area and the new yard in front of the blue house is striking, as this original yard has been sprayed twice yearly for 3.5 years with a farm grade fish emulsion and soil conditioner a friend of mine invented, whereas the other yard has only gotten two treatments and began with crappy soil. The gooseberry above (bottom left corner) was planted at the same time as the one in front of the blue house, but is three times as full! That gives me hope for the blue house yard, which just needs more TLC to catch up to its neighbor.

Above, you can also see a row of dwarf apple trees and some of the backyard gardens. Here’s a closer look at those:

backyard garden

Zinnias have finally made a strong, regular appearance, shown here with various chards, cabbage, tomato, French sorrel, nasturtium, borage and calendula. Behind them you can see our two pokeweed sentinels by the back gate, more comfrey and borage, and just a hint of blueberry bushes and raspberries to the upper left:

zinnias and friends

Cushaw squash has begun its journey to the sun. These are the extremely drought tolerant vines that produced five toddler sized squash last summer with me completely ignoring them. You can see one of those below, alongside Egyptian walking (all over the place) onions, sea kale, tomato, eggplant, more borage, and kohlrabi, with rhubarb in the back and another triple tiered bed to the upper right containing various peppers, Thai basil and a volunteer melon of some sort:

cushaw

I’ve been harvesting, freezing, juicing, making falafel white scallop squash “fries” in the convection oven, and today marks the first pickles of 2016:

(No, I did not juice that entire homegrown beet! I used about a third, and that pile of homegrown produce (except three stalks of celery) made 1.5 pints of green juice. Mmmm, so fresh! The white scallop squash “fries” helped me use up some falafel mix that needed to go. I just tossed strips with a bit of olive oil and the mix, then baked at 400 and finished with a broiler until crispy. They went really well with a homemade vegan ranch dressing over salad greens, fresh tomato and a cucumber.)

The squirrel planted giant sunflowers out back have reached at least ten feet! You can see them below with the white scallop squash plant (bottom) and the “ideal companion plant” borage, which has pretty much taken over here. The bees love it, so I’m getting loads of pollination this year:

giant sunnies

Despite the enormous sunflower, the three Brussels sprout plants growing under it appear to enjoy my neglect:

Brussels sprouts

The echinacea by our front door is in full bloom…

coneflowers

…and every morning begins with me opening the curtains and calling out, “Hello, morning glories! You’re looking glorious!”

morning glories through the window

Wishing you abundant beauty and deliciousness!

Spiritual Practices to Finding Equilibrium in the Chaos: Grounding, and Flow through the Druid Elements

Here are some excellent coping strategies and awareness for all the crazy energies being reflected on the world stage right now. As always, Dana provides detailed instructions and wisdom. Many thanks!

The Druid's Garden

A tremendous amount of really difficult occurrences are happening in the world right now. It seems like the more time that passes, the more we balance on the edge. The edge of what exactly, nobody can say.  But the edge of something, and likely, not something any of us are looking forward to. Things seem to be spinning faster, and faster; the light growing darker and darker.  A lot of folks are having difficulty just coping with reading the news or even being on social media, the enormity of everything–social, political, environmental, personal–weighing down.  Responses to this range from rage and anger to numbness. There is a heaviness in the air that cannot be discounted.

A good place to seek the stability of calas A good place to seek the stability of calas

And so, many of us turn to spiritual practices as a way of helping make sense of it all, to find a way forward, finding a…

View original post 3,028 more words

Seeing with a Glittering Eye

The glittering eye seems to be the same inner eye that sees the Fae, observes a pulsating light that flits across the garden and swears the factory across the street is a bizarre mirage hiding deep Indiana forest filled with laughing fauns. (Not the w kind either, the magical ones…). To cultivate the glittering eye, it helps to retreat from those who insist upon their “normal” vision. A world without magic is a sorry world, indeed, but when the world glitters ….ah, such beauty everywhere!

A Druid Way

The inspirational email from OBOD for this week reads:

And above all, watch with glittering eyes the whole world around you because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don’t believe in magic will never find it. — Roald Dahl

OK Roald, what are you saying? I’ll walk some of the way with you because of your magic. After all, it’s almost part of the definition that creative people have felt it, and pass along a hint of it, even as it slips between their fingers. But wait — belief comes first, and thenmagic? Seeing is believing, we’ve been told; believing is seeing. But what’s a glittering eye? Well, it seems it’s a useful technique.

Sometimes the world demands it of us — it’s the only option if we want to see at all.

On our return car trip from a Chicago wedding last weekend, we…

View original post 372 more words

Lilies, Glads, Sunflowers and the Backyard Forest Garden

Mid-July has brought an explosion of white and color in the backyard (and front yard) forest garden. People keep asking about these white lilies — some of them taller than David — so I thought I’d share some of the abundance and beauty:

A peek at the edible ornamental backyard forest garden with black lace elderberry to the left, various currants and jostaberries to the right of the path, plus a potted lemon tree, and off frame to the right, hazelnut, aronia berry and apples:

backyard forest garden

You can see more of the raised beds that allow abundant growth over a yard full of juglone containing black walnut stumps. The beds are so full that you can’t really see the three beds of triple-tiered produce behind these green zebra tomatoes, bush basil, shiso, egglant, asparagus, beans, chard, and marigolds, but they’re spilling over with a mystery melon, tomatoes, Thai basil, cabbage and more:

The front yard has gone full on sunflower, gladiolus and lilies, so large that you can barely see the cherry and pear trees, blueberry bushes, hazelnuts, kale and kalette behind them:

front yard sunflowers and lilies

The bees are very happy here, too, with skirret, chives, borage, calendula, black eyed Susan’s, zinnias and elecampane:

nectary

It’s difficult to believe or convey just how non-magical this yard originally felt and looked. Yes, it does take work to maintain, but I actually spend far, far less time in the yard than I did for the first two years of living here. This year, I have spent more time harvesting than anything else: black and red raspberries, blueberries, currants, aronia berries, strawberries, sea kale, lettuce, herbs, asparagus, peas, green beans, pears, sour cherries, tomatoes, basil, garlic, onions, cucumbers, parsnips, cabbage, eggplant, flowers for bouquets and loads and loads and loads of greens!

We eat well, and many of the trees and shrubs have only just begun to produce. We look forward to the extra thirteen asparagus plants I’ve added to the blue house yard, along with more fruit and nut trees and shrubs.

Anyone can add food to their landscape! You don’t need 1/3 of an acre like we have here (minus the houses and garages). Espaliered fruit trees take very little room along a fence. Fruit and nut shrubs and trees can take the place of more traditional ornamentals. Special colors of vegetable plants make them look unrecognizable as food plants, blending into more traditional flower beds. You can use raised beds, plant in the ground, a Garden Tower, “big bag beds,” or any and all combinations of these to fit your space, time and budget. Too much shade? Grow currants. They produce buckets full even in deep shade. No room? Experiment with vertical gardening through trellises, teepees and tiered raised beds.

For me it’s not just about the food. It’s about bringing beauty and nature to an otherwise industrial, impoverished and forlorn spot of earth. Birds, chipmunks, squirrels, rabbits and all manner of insects abound in our yards, delighting the eyes and senses … and most importantly, the heart and soul. In a world of chaos, gardens offer a chance to bring peace, abundance and delight, along with grounding and natural anti-depressants. As David likes to say, what’s not to love?

If you missed spring and summer produce, it’s not too late to plant for fall. Look into cool season crops like kale, brassicas, Lucullus chard, beets, carrots, daikon radishes, and even very short season warm weather veggies. Check your seed packs for days to harvest and subtract from your average first frost date to see if you can still get a harvest!

Wishing you and yours abundance and joy.

 

Reiki 1 Certification Class in Goshen/Michiana

REIKI TRAINING

Reiki Level 1 Certification Class in Goshen, Indiana

Saturday, September 10, 2016 from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. (East Coast time) in Goshen, Indiana.

For reference, Goshen is about 40 minutes East of South Bend, 8 miles from the Michigan border, and 2-3 hours from the Chicago area, depending on your exact location. A limited number of rooms are available for students who need to spend the night.

Students will learn and/or receive:

• History, nature, and science of Reiki.
• Experiencing Reiki energy.
• Using Reiki with other healing arts.
• Discussion of 21-day cleanse.
• Treating animals and plants.
• Essence scanning process.
• Establishing a Reiki practice.
• Practice self-treatment hand positions.
• Handouts and resource list.
• Reiki Circles.
• What a Reiki lineage represents.
• Giving a Reiki treatment with hand positions.
• Ethics and Legal Responsibilities as a Reiki Practitioner.
• Reiki Level 1 Attunement.

Certification: At the end of the training, each student will receive a certificate acknowledging completion of Reiki Level 1, as well as recognition as a Reiki Level 1 Practitioner. Taking any Reiki training with me also qualifies each student to audit (at no cost) any additional Reiki classes taught by me, up to and including the level completed with her (space permitting).

Fee: $175 ($150 if prepaid by 8/31/2016)

Please contact me to reserve your spot.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,492 other followers