Author Archive

Second Preview from “The Biology of Story”

Beautiful! Thank you, Becca, for bringing Coleridge back into relevance for the world as we create new and preferred realities.

Becca Psyche Tarnas

Here is a new preview of an interview of mine from Amnon Buchbinder’s interactive documentary entitled The Biology of Story, this one focusing on the imagination as its own ecology.

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Seeking Sacred Springs for Inspiration and Healing

Another sensitive and empowering post from Dana! This one touches upon a topic close to my heart, and our group Imbolc gathering focused on healing the waters, too, including those in not-too-distant Flint, Michigan. The idea of finding a sacred spring (or well) has been knocking on my consciousness for awhile. I don’t know that we have any left in this part of Indiana; however, who knew Dana would find one in fracking Pennsylvania? May we each find the flow that connects us to healing and rejuvenation of the Land and of ourselves.

The Druid's Garden

Heffley Spring in June 2015 Heffley Spring in June 2015

The druid tradition–along with many others–is full of stories about sacred waters. From the Chalice Well in Glastonbury to the invocation of the “Salmon who Dwells Within The Sacred Pool,” we’ve got our water going on. Imbolc (which happened earlier this week) is often a holiday associated with flows, and many of us do workings with water and healing with water in various ways. More than this though, water has a number of key places within our conceptual frameworks in the druid tradition.  In the four element system so commonly used in earth-based traditions (that has been part of western thinking for a very, very long time), water represents our emotions, our intuition, and our connection to our spirituality. In the druid revival’s three element system, water is connected with Gywar, the principle of flow. It is Gywar that helps us move forward and…

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February 2016 Specials

I know many of you have been asking about these, so thanks for your patience. I only post specials as inspiration sparks. Here are the February 2016 Specials:

Sacred Soul Session

This is a new offering designed to help you reclaim and nurture a sense of the sacred in ways that foster your soul’s deepest longings. For some people, this might be a uniquely designed ceremony to release a past grief or regret. For others, it might offer a list of resources specifically tailored to you at this point on your path. For some people, it might mean helping you to utilize skills you already have in new ways that deepen your experience. For still others, a Sacred Soul Session might include general instructions about how to design meaningful rituals and select proper timing, so that you can incorporate ritual as a regular means of empowerment and healing. Without performing the reading, I don’t know exactly what you’ll receive, but the reading will focus on bringing your outer life much more into alignment with your inner being.

So called “primitive” societies value the importance and power of ritual. As we shift through so many changes, both outward and inward, collective and individual, effective ritual moves energy in ways the rational mind, affirmations, and emotions can only approximate. The Sacred Soul Session arises from my recognition of the deeply compassionate and aligned Wisdom of the Soul, and how small, symbolic acts can effect enormous change.

$77 for this half hour session. Special must be purchased on or before February 29, 2016, although sessions can be scheduled after that time. Please contact me to schedule.

45-Minute Medical Intuitive Readings for $133

I usually only offer hour or half-hour sessions, because they make for much simpler scheduling on my end; however, sometimes people have more than a half-hour’s worth of topics to discuss yet not quite an hour. This special is for anyone who would like more support and insights than we can cover in a half-hour but who doesn’t want to commit to an entire hour. (Save $42.) Offer valid if prepaid on or before February 29, 2016. Please contact me to sign up.

 

Reiki Level 2 Certification Class in Goshen on February 27, 2016

Reiki Level 2 Certification Class in Goshen, IN

Saturday, February 27, 2016, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

This interactive class includes:

• Reiki Level 2 Attunement.
• Experiencing Reiki energy.
• Discussion of 21-day cleanse.
• Establishing a Reiki practice.
• Different qualities of Reiki energy
• Techniques for replacing addictions and bad habits with better ones.
• Clearing rooms & cleaning crystals
• Chakras and healing.
• Mental/Emotional Balance technique
• How to send Reiki thru time & space (long distance healing)
• Legal Responsibilities as a Reiki Practitioner.
• How to amplify Reiki energy.

At the end of the training, each student will receive a certificate acknowledging completion of Reiki Level 2, as well as recognition as a Reiki Level 2 Practitioner. Taking any Reiki training with me also qualifies each student to audit (at no cost) any additional Reiki classes taught by me, up to and including the level completed with me (space permitting).

Rate: $275 ($250 if prepaid two weeks early.)

This class will be held at the blue house next door, which has two double bed guest rooms available for out of town students who need accommodations. Goshen is 2-3 hours from Chicagoland, depending on your exact location, 40 minutes east of South Bend, and 8 miles south of the Michigan border. Please contact me to reserve your spot.

Two Quotes

From my faery friend, Ella:

Every revolutionary act of love, even the smallest, most private action,
raises the vibration of the planet and changes the world.
~Lissa Rankin, M.D.


“When the Earth is ravaged and the animals are dying, a new tribe of people shall come onto the Earth of many colors, creeds and classes, and by their actions and deeds shall make the Earth green again. They shall be known as the warriors of the rainbow.” ~Hopi

One Man’s Evolutionary Search for the Moral Meal

Thanks to Ann Kreilkamp for linking to one of those uncomfortable posts that breaks through conditioned, seemingly obvious beliefs about compassionate eating.

I loved being strictly vegan for over eight years, and I still eat a predominantly plant based, mostly homegrown or personally known farm sourced diet, supplemented by locally sourced, picked up at the farm, very well treated and well loved raw goats’ milk and occasional free-range, organic eggs from local farmers. The more I garden and study permaculture, and the more organic farmers I meet, the move I’ve realized that a strict vegan diet isn’t the “feed the world” cure or even the most compassionate or sustainable way to eat. It sure was nice to think so, though! Just eat superfoods and buy organic, then you’re good to go, right? No one gets hurt if we all eat vegan. We can feed the world if we all eat vegan. Trouble is, that theory breaks down when you really start learning what it takes to grow food on a large enough scale to feed yourself, let alone the world.

As Daniel Zetah notes, why do cows matter more than other creatures? Beyond the obviously egregious factory farming, why are monoculture crops (even organic ones) that steal wildlife habitat and kill ecosystems “more compassionate” than personally raised and grazed animals with “one bad day”? How is a superfood shipped in from 1000’s of miles away, jacking up the price of staples for indigenous communities in South America and driving natives off ancestral land whose ecoculture they maintained for generations, or turning rainforest into a monocrop “more compassionate” than eating an egg from a chicken you lovingly raised in your own backyard? I don’t eat meat, but I have yet to meet a vegan organic farmer who remains vegan. Even Marjory Wildcraft (“Grow Your Own Groceries”) began as a strict vegan and then recognized that she was putting way more calories into growing food than she received from her best efforts. Running a deficit of return is not sustainable on an individual level, nor will it feed the world.

Number crunching of acres of soy or grain directly eaten vs. acres of grain or grass eaten by animals works in theory, but not in practice. Humans don’t have the digestive systems to break down that amount of grain in a safe, sustainable way. Too much soy causes all sorts of imbalances, and many people can no longer tolerate any grains. Without some kind of perennial vegetables, fruit/nut trees, and foraged “weeds,” eating and growing a diet of all grains and annual vegetables, or monoculture soy and corn crops, don’t lead to thriving. Not for the planet and not for most humans.

I’ve watched too many severely ill vegans reclaim their health on a paleo diet to espouse “all vegan all the time as the cure for all disease,” and I’ve witnessed enough closed permaculture loops utilizing manure, fish waste, and “blood ‘n’ bones” to recognize that we’re not really better off rising above these processes rather than returning them to the Earth. Nature has its own cycle of life that very much includes death and decay. Just because we don’t see it on our “peaceful plate” doesn’t mean that cycle ceases to exist. Without it, “life” begins to require all sorts of unnatural inputs and destructive things — chemical herbicides and pesticides, or spending hours hand killing bugs and slugs, tilling the soil, stripping the land each year instead of working more in harmony with natural succession.

Without regular inputs or carefully planned polycultures such as Daniel Zetah describes (sometimes even requiring grazing animals), the soil eventually won’t support annual crops, and certainly won’t maintain nutrient levels that provide enough minerals long term. Unhealthy soil leads to unhealthy food, and without renewing the soil, crops become more prone to insects and disease, making organic farming more difficult, not easier.

I highly recommend this piece, as it really challenges how far our compassion extends — for animals traditionally eaten? For animals in nature? For the Earth Herself? If we care for our planet as a whole, then the efficiency and closed loops of food production do matter. Just because we don’t see the consequences of our organically farmed veggies doesn’t mean those consequences don’t exist.

Growing your own food beyond hobby level makes you acutely aware of how everything we do impacts the rest of nature, and how simple answers don’t always stand strong beyond the theories. This piece challenges me, too, but it’s worth a read by anyone who loves animals and loves our planet. Ultimately, we need to choose what feels right and balanced to us. I’m still an organic eating vegetarian who grows much of my own food with permaculture principles. Sometimes I feel a little selfish and reckless about that choice, though — not because I should be vegan, but because my friends here who raise their own meat with zero waste and eat nearly all calories from their own farm are actually living with far lower impact than we are with our store-bought quinoa, tempeh and grains.

“There is no magic bullet. There is no one way to eat that is going to be devoid of guilt or devoid of suffering. There is no way to exist in this world without taking the life of other beings. And that complex truth was missing for me, and it’s still missing for a lot of people.” ~Daniel Zetah

Beyond Vegetarianism: One Man’s Journey from Tofu to Tallow in Search of the Moral Meal

 

X-Files, Owls, Faeries and Soft Disclosure

Today’s post began one way, and then turned into a compilation of resources:

Here’s an interesting and thoughtful piece from Rebecca Hardcastle Wright called, “What’s Beneath ET Disclosure: Were We Lab Rats?” — definitely worth a read now that the new X-Files, Hillary, Podesta, all manner of experiencers and the New Age cavalry seem to be pushing a soft disclosure of ET presence. As an ironic rule, I don’t make firm conclusions, really not in any area, but especially not this one. Rebecca asks herself some difficult questions, yet her conclusion reminds me of something I notice in so many other areas these days — no matter what the original intent and real or imagined existence of would-be overlords, people continue to free themselves from the maze.

In addition to Rebecca’s article, I highly recommend Mike Clelland’s new book, “The Messengers: Owls, Synchronicity and the UFO Abductee,” which I’ve reviewed here. You’ll know if that book’s for you or not by reading the review.

Ardy Sixkiller Clarke also does an excellent job of chronicling Native stories in her books “Encounters with Star People: Untold Stories of American Indians” and “Sky People: Untold Stories of Alien Encounters in Mesoamerica.”

Rebecca’s article and these authors focus largely on the UFO phenomenon in recent times, especially since 1947; however, old faery lore and folk tales are filled with many of the same sorts of stories from hundreds of years ago. For an eerie exploration of the complex and sometimes spooky world of Faerie, I recommend this version of “The Fairy-Faith in Celtic Countries”, by W. Y. Evans-Wentz. His book arose from a c. 1910 dissertation and includes interviews with older inhabitants of Celtic Countries passing down their own experiences, as well as family stories. Even accounting for the good and ill of any species and the Christian overlay superimposed on original tales, this book heightens mystery and explores both positive and negative encounters with the Faery Realm. I found it impossible to read that book without marveling at the similarity of contemporary ET encounters and many of these true “fairy tales.”

I also very much enjoy Margie McArthur’s book, “Faery Healing: The Lore and the Legacy.” She covers ancient stories with somewhat of a Christian overlay, but she also explores specific healing gifts from the faeries, along with specific illnesses attributed to faeries (and possible cures).

The BBC film series, “Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell” offers a creepy look into reasons for exercising caution making deals with faeries. Remember, according to Faery Rules, “A person’s word is bond,” so don’t make deals unless you intend to keep them! You might also like my follow-up post, “More Tips for Connecting with the Faeries.” That said, Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell are definitely dealing with what’s known as “The Unseelie Court,” composed of faeries not friendly to humans. While these do exist and it’s wise to use discernment, there’s also the “Seelie Court,” whose members are much more kindly disposed to humans. Additionally, you can find wild faeries, solitary faeries, trooping faeries, Elementals, Leprechauns and all manner of Nature Spirits. It’s a vast world out there … and in here!

Again, I make no conclusions in this realm. I’ve had paranormal experiences of such wide variety, and my brain and energy system work so differently than most people’s that my own world won’t come crumbling down with anyone else’s disclosure — sincere, highly sensationalized and/or carefully orchestrated. I include these links and resources for those who aren’t at all sure what to think, or who find such things of interest. The more consciously we approach these topics, and the more we exert our own sovereignty and ability to create our own experiences, the more freeing and expansive it all becomes. :)

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