Chaos, Creativity and Pandora’s Real Box

I love this one from Jamie and agree 100%. Regular readers know that as an artist I value chaos for its amazing potential to create change –exceptionally potent and positive change, when we identify the forms in which we would love to nudge those energies.

I love Jamie’s reclamation of Pandora, too, and have been pondering a similar dynamic with our yard: the fine line between exuberant abundance and uncontrollable plants. Nice and neat does not produce as well as gloriously wild. I love to surf that perfect wave between beauty and chaos — between intentionality and the surprising gifts of Nature and the Great Mystery. Big blessings and much love!

Sophia's Children

Pandora's Box, 1871, by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. PD image courtesy of Wikimedia. Pandora’s Box, 1871, by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. PD image courtesy of Wikimedia.

“If everything is uncertain, then the future is open to human creativity, to possibility and therefore to a better world.” ~ Immanuel Wallerstein

We don’t normally see chaos as an ally,because it seems so, well, chaotic. Uncertain. It feels uncomfortable and thus unfriendly.

It freaks us outwhen ‘real life’ starts going all Salvador Dali on us and melting and shapeshifting whether we want it to or not (and often, we don’t, even if we sort of do).

Part of the problem is that we’ve been taught that change is bad — that we’re supposed to create things that have ‘staying power’ and just keep on growing and expanding endlessly in the form that we envision.

The 1897 painting of fighting "Laelaps" (now Dryptosaurus) by Charles R. Knight. PD-US, Wikimedia. The 1897 painting of fighting “Laelaps” (now Dryptosaurus) by Charles R. Knight. PD-US, Wikimedia.

When things start changing, the dear, sweet

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7 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Sky on October 22, 2016 at 10:49 pm

    Surf that wave, girl! Surf that wave! ❤ Sky

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I love this Laura! This is exactly why the Egyptians loved Set. He was the god of chaos. There was nothing evil about him. The patriarchs made him evil because they didn’t understand him. Thanks for sharing.

    Like

  3. Hehe, thanks, Sky! ❤️

    Like

  4. James, maybe the patriarchs DID understand the power of chaos, but wanted to keep it for themselves! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I’m sure the ones that understood kept it for themselves. I was trying to play nice. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Posted by Kieron on October 23, 2016 at 8:56 pm

    I like the reclamation of Pandora, too! The name means “all gifts”, derived from a combination of Greek παν (pan) “all” and δωρον (doron) “gift”. All Gifts seems to point to another face of the Great Mother, and making Pandora into another version of Eve, Lilith, the Magdalene, et al, echoes the “All goddesses must fall” theme. Another piece of the puzzle! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

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