The Guardian ~ A chef’s manifesto: let’s tackle food waste with good fare

David sent me this great article from The Guardian, in part, because I’ve been making delicious veggie broths before tossing scraps into the compost bin. Why spend $4.50 on a prepackaged, non-recyclable organic veggie broth or use perfectly new veggies to make broth when we’ve got all sorts of garden fresh scraps each week? I make broth now, but in the past, I’ve also used juice pulp to make dehydrated veggie crackers or salad toppings.

Our friends in Elkhart go even further — dumpster diving for anything they can’t grow in their garden. I’m personally not ready to do that, but this Guardian piece shows what’s happening at even the highest levels of elite eaters, including at the recent NYC UN meal. I’m heartened that at least someone at that top down sustainability conference looked towards waste streams rather than SMART technology, toxic fluorescent lights, and carbon taxes. As chef Dan Barber said, “[I]f you think not leaving your plate full of food is the way to deal with this issue, you’re letting yourself off too easy. … We can transform the food system and get to a place where we need to be for the future, before the future’s going to force us to do it.”

Here’s the link to an article that really makes you think — especially if you’re an American.

6 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Kieron on October 30, 2015 at 12:28 pm

    Indeed. When he was a professional chef, my SO used to toss vegetable rinds and scraps into a pot for stock. The convenient “Better than bouillion” and pre-fab “stock” shortcuts got him for awhile, until I came along and was horrified by the artificial ingredients and excess salt. I wanted to learn how to do it the old way, including with bones, and now we have something cooking on “low” flame almost constantly. It’s really not hard if you can adjust your attitude toward doing a little extra chop and prep work. I’d rather pay the farmer than the doctor, after all! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Yes, pay the farmer, not the doctor!

    Like

  3. Totally agree! Once upon a time, DIY began with stock 🙂 I store parings and peelings in the freezer to keep them fresh (since I live alone and am only cooking for one, it takes a bit longer to build up enough scraps). When the container gets full I make a pot of stock and then freeze the stock in smaller portions. Compared to buying a pricey box that must be discarded, I’d say homemade stock is pretty convenient, too!

    Like

  4. Yes, convenient, fresher, and much tastier!

    Like

  5. Posted by Mitch on October 30, 2015 at 5:23 pm

    Dan Barbe is a really interesting man, his whole manifesto is going beyond organic, encouraging farmer’s to select seed’s, crops based on taste = nutrient density, I watched him on the fascinating Netflix show The Chef’s Table; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tqGZKiOLsU8 This is a great 60mn talk with Ira Glass https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w0nak0fsQlM He was one of the first chef’s to have his own farm, Blue Hills Farm in NY, he’s got alot of video’s on youtube that are inspiring.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Cool, oh, is he the guy who writes about making our food more delicious? Makes so much sense! Thanks for the extra links. 🙂

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: