Garden Update: Flowers and Harvesting from Fall and Early Spring Plantings

I’m really starting to enjoy this maturing garden. Even though the yard remains far more than a part time “job,” each year, more and more plants bear fruit, perennials and bulbs take off, and I have greater success with multi-season crops.

This week has been heavy on the garlic, shallots and peas, although I’ve also harvested impressive amounts (for second year plants) of various berries, which we’ve enjoyed in smoothies and our favorite way: over vanilla coconut ice cream!

berries and coconut ice cream

About 1/4 of our garlic, which I planted all over the yard. Imagine my delight in finding the largest bulbs grew in a former black walnut area where few other things grow!

About 1/4 of our garlic, which I planted all over the yard. Imagine my delight in finding the largest bulbs grew in a former black walnut area where few other things grow!

Don't forget the garlic scapes, bursting with flavor in curries, Italian dishes and stirfries.

Don’t forget the garlic scapes, bursting with flavor in curries, Italian dishes and stirfries.

peas, parsley, chard and lacinato kale

peas, parsley, chard and lacinato kale

Back to the garden:

Our cardoon (related to artichoke) is getting ready to put on a show for the bees and butterflies!

Our cardoon (related to artichoke) is getting ready to put on a show for the bees and butterflies!

The season's first morning glory.

The season’s first morning glory.

The Garden Tower continues to wow visitors and produce a lot of food and flowers.

The Garden Tower continues to wow visitors and produce a lot of food and flowers.

Robinhood roses out front are very popular with the bees.

Robinhood roses out front are very popular with the bees.

Last year's sedum groundcover has finally begun to cover ground ... and to bloom.

Last year’s sedum groundcover has finally begun to cover ground … and to bloom.

Lilies, hollyhocks and wild strawberries going to town in the black walnut area so well favored by the garlic. I also have Garden Giant mushroom spawn there, so I wonder if that has anything to do with these extra happy plants.

Lilies, hollyhocks and wild strawberries going to town in the black walnut area so well favored by the garlic. I also have Garden Giant mushroom spawn there, so I wonder if that has anything to do with these extra happy plants.

Lilies, Veronica, sea kale, chard, dwarf Korean lilac, black eyed Susan's and more in the curving paths and beds up front.

Lilies, Veronica, sea kale, chard, dwarf Korean lilac, black eyed Susan’s and more in the curving paths and beds up front.

Yesterday marked the arrival of more (yes, more!) hazelnut trees, blueberry bushes and a butterfly bush, along with a huge wheelbarrow full of my friend Kimber’s awesome soil from an area she needed dug out. Note to self: a cart full of rich soil sounds much easier to pull for a mile than it is. Never. Again. But the hazels will appreciate a better start. Our yard’s becoming like one of those clown cars: just how many trees, shrubs, perennials, bulbs and annuals can I fit? Oh, you’d be surprised. I hear a witch hazel calling my name. Winter blooming, juglone (black walnut) tolerant, and medicinal? Check, check, check. And a good dowser, to boot!

I hope you enjoy the abundance and beauty, and please know that not every garden project needs to be this extensive. I feel called to regenerate this land, and each tree planted feels like a dear friend. Each flower that blooms makes me smile, and each just picked meal gives our bodies such wonderful nourishment and taste bud delight. If you can’t ever imagine planting or harvesting this many things, that’s OK. Maybe you’re not called to do so, but do plant something. Your heart and your planet will thank you!

16 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Kieron on June 28, 2015 at 12:07 am

    Blueberries, too?? Wow, I’m impressed. They take a lot of coddling in the beginning to get the soil pH just right, which has been off-putting for me. I still might build a separate raised bed and add the required amendments.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I already had two blueberry bushes set in a huge pile of pine needles and peat moss, but I decided to get some even more cold hardy ones to put in raised beds in an area where nothing grows due to a black walnut stump. For a raised bed, you need the bushes to be two zones hardier than if they were in the ground, so one is right on the edge, depending on if we are zone 5b or zone 6. I ordered 24″ wide and 16″ deep “Smart Pots,” which should be large enough for the mature plants. We buy a lot of blueberries, and one of the plants is a 3-in-1 for extended harvesting. It should make use of this area of the yard that’s otherwise wasted. 🙂

    Like

  3. Reblogged this on Tania Marie's Blog and commented:
    Laura is an amazing gardening faery – more like farmer faery with her knowledge and know 😉 While I’ve always had a love for nature, plants, trees, flowers, and organic goodness, aside from the few plants I’d purchase and nurture, it wasn’t until buying the house we live in now, which had many mature fruit trees to begin with before we added more lushness and beauty to it, along with Laura’s inspiration with her garden and telling me about the Garden Tower, that I started on my own journey.

    This post of hers shows an update on her beautiful garden that I had not only the chance to see and help out with, but also enjoy the fruits of the labor, so to speak, in my tummy.

    As you can see, lots of yum, beauty, and abundance from the faery garden! I also am particularly blessed and grateful that she shares some of the garden magick with me throughout the year in dried herbs, tea blends, home made jams, the best “honey”-like lavender blend, dried greens for my smoothies, and more! MMMMMMM MMMMMMM GOOD!

    Everything is looking so lovely in her garden and growing quickly even since my being there. I particularly love the sedum groundcover…that’s got my name on it. 😉

    I also love how we are both examples of what’s possible from easy to more extensive gardening.

    As Laura shares, we don’t all have to do things the same way. It’s okay if you don’t see yourself gardening. And if you do, just know that it CAN be easy and you don’t need to know anything, like me!

    We aren’t all going to be part-time farmers, although it would be cool if we were. 😉 Yet we can all in some small way find our zone with Nature that aligns with us.

    But she IS right, that just planting something and having the committed partnership and responsibility to cultivating it, finding joy in each day of growth, and smiling with excitement when you see it blossom, and share its gifts in response to your love and care, along with a little water and sunlight….will enrich your life in ways you can’t imagine.

    Today, just an hour spent outdoors planting, pruning, tending to things was invigorating for me. After having my hands in the soil and then sitting at my desk to work for a bit, I found myself feeling really fresh in a raw and natural way, that was like a cleansing and lively recharge…almost like when you jump in the ocean on a hot day. That Earthy goodness just washed all over me.

    And it can for you too!

    I don’t spend hardly any time on things other than checking on my plants, watering when needed, pruning, and harvesting. I only have the occasional seeding or planting that takes place if I want more veggies, need to transplant, or replace any plants. It does encourage me to spend even more time though just touching and exploring my plants, which they and I both get to receive the direct benefits from.

    Thank you Laura for sharing your piece of Heaven on Earth and for inspiring others to bring their heart into partnership with Nature in any way they can.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Posted by Senatssekretär FREISTAAT DANZIG on June 28, 2015 at 3:06 am

    Reblogged this on Aussiedlerbetreuung und Behinderten – Fragen and commented:
    Lecker, ich habe beim Türken, um die Ecke, solche JougurtBecher erhalten! Erdbeeren und auch Jougurt haben so lecker geschmeckt, und es war für mich eine Belohnung, für das Schaffen am Tage! Dem Schöpfer für solche Einfälle und dem macher sei es gedankt!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Posted by James G on June 28, 2015 at 8:24 am

    Beautiful garden Laura. Your right, I have 2 small vegetable gardens and a bunch of flowers and trees. Nature thanks me everyday. Just need to keep your eyes and heart open😊. Love your garden!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I have only recently discovered garlic scapes which make such a fine addition chopped up in salads – not overly garlicky for the garlic sqeamish and providing a delightful crunch.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Thanks so much, James, and thanks for all the beauty you nurture and habitat you provide. 🙂

    Like

  8. Yes, aren’t they fun?! Last year, I also discovered that they are great kind of coiled around runner bean sprouts to keep away the critters. I forgot about that this year, so I’m not sure how many scarlet runner bean teepees and Christmas lima’s we’ll have. LOL, I “had” to plant a hazelnut tree to fill their intended vertical space!

    Like

  9. Thanks so much for all your additional inspirations and details, Tania! I’m smiling to myself, as I know you’ve caught the garden bug, and what a delightful bug it is! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  10. you’re so welcome! hehehe! we are cute! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  11. ❤ *Plant crazy* cute! LOL … 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Posted by Cheryl on June 28, 2015 at 8:43 pm

    You are magical! Nice to see your hard work bearing such dividends. 😘

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Thanks, Cheryl! ❤

    Like

  14. Beautiful and inspiring, Laura. I smile, too, as I moved through the photos!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Thanks, Jamie! Glad they brought you some smiles. 🙂

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: