Garden Update ~ Hollyhocks, Milkweed Angel, Shrooms and Blooms

Hollyhocks behind dianthus, alpine strawberries, garlic, Asian lilies, some kind of perennial daisy, comfrey, lupine, and a hopefully soon to be acquired and planted rosa rugosa alba.

Hollyhocks behind dianthus, alpine strawberries, garlic, Asian lilies, some kind of perennial daisy, comfrey, lupine, and a hopefully soon to be acquired and planted rosa rugosa alba.

Black hollyhocks grown from seed last year. These are the truest black flowers I've ever seen!

Black hollyhocks grown from seed last year. These are the truest black flowers I’ve ever seen!

Volunteer milkweed with its own angel and butterfly friendly cilantro and calendula

Volunteer milkweed with its own angel and butterfly friendly cilantro and calendula

Gnomes willing, we'll have some shitake mushrooms in 6-14 months covering these logs in their home by nettles, apple mint and wild violets.

Gnomes willing, we’ll have some shitake mushrooms in 6-14 months covering these logs in their home by nettles, apple mint and wild violets.

Garden Tower a week ago after heavy harvesting.

Garden Tower a week ago after heavy harvesting.

Garden tower with a bit of a backyard view

Garden tower with a bit of a backyard view

Black lace elderberry had a few blooms this year.

Black lace elderberry had a few blooms this year.

The beginnings of one of three zepherine (shade tolerant and climbing) pink roses, along with a petunia like annual from the farmer's market.

The beginnings of one of three zepherine (shade tolerant and climbing) pink roses, along with a petunia like annual from the farmer’s market.

Lacinato kale and friends

Lacinato kale and friends

Backyard and side yard view with good bugs friendly mix

Backyard and side yard view with good bugs friendly mix

This bed is just getting started for the season.

This bed is just getting started for the season.

Cottage garden up front with space for the veggie crops to fill in as they grow.

Cottage garden up front with space for the veggie crops to fill in as they grow.

Potatoes in bags experiment.

Potatoes in bags experiment.

Milkweed with sedum ground cover filling in, cardoon, blueberries, irises, yarrow, prunella, liatris, and purple coneflower getting ready to bloom.

Milkweed with sedum ground cover filling in, cardoon, blueberries, irises, yarrow, prunella, liatris, and purple coneflower getting ready to bloom.

12 responses to this post.

  1. awesome! so much more fun to see after having “seen” it. of the 5 seeds you gave me for my garden tower now 4 of them have sprouted..the only one not yet are the elves blend sunflowers. but the cilantro, arugula, kale, and collards all are. the arugula took 2 attempts at seeding, and then went. so i’m going to reseed the elves blend and hopefully the same happens.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Yay! Well, that elves blend is kind of old, so you might want to overseed in case germination is not so good. I need to dig through my seeds to see what else I want to start. That cover crop is almost ready to remove, and although I have cantaloupe, squash and watermelon planted in some spots, I think I can tuck in some more lettuce and a heat tolerant spinach! 🙂

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  3. Posted by Senatssekretär FREISTAAT DANZIG on June 14, 2015 at 3:17 pm

    Reblogged this on Aussiedlerbetreuung und Behinderten – Fragen and commented:

    Glück, Auf, meine Heimat!

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  4. yes i overseeded the arugula and that worked so maybe the elves blend too. i’ll do today after reiki class. everything’s looking great over there!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Thanks! Sounds like things are growing well in your garden, too!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I love your angel!!! And your plants all look so healthy and happy!

    Question: What kind of container do you recommend for planting tomatoes, Laura? (Clay? Plastic? Recommended depth?) I put four tomato plants in the ground near my house, in an area that just became sunny after the huge maple tree next door was cut down. But my neighbor warned me that the soil may be contaminated with lead from paint that most likely covered (and chipped of of) my 1860’s home for decades. So I’m thinking of digging the tomatoes up and replanting in pots. Don’t want to be eating lead…

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Posted by Kieron on June 14, 2015 at 4:52 pm

    Cool stuff! I had a patch of black hollyhocks once from a seed exchange, and they are indeed truly as black as can be for flowers– not even really blue-black, but black. :). Also, I like the potatoes in a bag experiment, so be sure to let us know how they turn out. 🙂 On another note, there are now 3 neighbors who have front yard garden plots in raised beds or regular/traditional in the ground, and one of them is a Hispanic household that historically has been a problem property with trash, noise and parties. I noticed one of the women clearing a patch of the lawn a few weeks ago and then tomato plants appeared. 🙂 Of course my Hmong next-door neighbors have all kinds of stuff growing in the margins and verges of their yard, and a bunch of chickens, too. 🙂 When I moved here 15 years ago, I was pretty much the only person gardening here. It must be contagious. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Fabulous, Kieron! It really is contagious. We have at least a third more gardens this year in our neighborhood and the adjacent one. Some of the houses on our very run down block have even planted flowers out front for the first time since we’ve lived here, and yesterday our landlord gave me full permission (begged me?) to “just stretch this yard all the way over to the other edge of the next property (which he also owns), and if I can buy the next house, have at that lawn, too.” Well, then! Don’t mind if I do! LOL, but maybe not this year. The blue house is for rent as of July 1. Faery Referral Network is on the job!

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  9. Thanks, Diana! Well, if you’re not super concerned about looks, I would just get four food grade five-gallon buckets and drill holes in the bottom — or else 5 gallon plastic pots would work, too, but I think the straight pots/buckets are better for tomatoes than the tapered ones. They like their roots to spread out so they don’t tip over. You’ll want at least 5 gallons, as they do get big. I would not do clay, because clay dries out, and tomatoes like steady moisture. You’ll be watering nonstop if you grow them in clay!

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  10. Hi Diana, actually, this is what I would use in your situation: http://bigbagbed.com/ . I have one, and things have grown well in it. The larger size will work for tomatoes. I’ve not grown tomatoes in mine, but it’s currently thriving with peas and fava beans. I’ll be growing cucumbers in it this summer, and I had a nice crop of beets last fall. xo

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  11. Posted by manyhahama1955 on June 15, 2015 at 2:11 pm

    Looking beautiful, Laura! A large yard to fill. I love the black lace elderberry…that is gorgeous! And, hollyhocks are one of my all time favorite flowers. have you been getting constant rain as well as us here in Missouri? Pretty wild, eh? Much love to you,
    Sophia

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Thanks, Sophia! Yes, we are still getting loads of rain here, even when not forecasted. My okra is still only about a half inch, LOL, and the basil … oh, my! Not a year for heat loving crops so far. Things look lush, though. I just picked up a second black lace elderberry for better pollination and because they’re so pretty! Much love and happy gardening, Laura

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