Garden Update ~ Signs of Life

crocus

The first daffodil to almost bloom....

The first daffodil to almost bloom….

New prayer flags went up yesterday -- specially made for outdoor use, unlike the faded cotton ones I finally composted.

New prayer flags went up yesterday — specially made for outdoor use, unlike the faded cotton ones I finally composted.

The miracle lettuce that survived when cold hardy kale did not. Garlic pokes up behind the lettuce, since I did not expect it to survive.

The miracle lettuce that survived when cold hardy kale did not. Garlic pokes up behind the lettuce, since I did not expect it to survive.

Spinach, chard, lettuce, garlic, fava bean sprouts, miner's lettuce, carrots, parsnips and garlic chives ... with some other seeds just starting to sprout, too.

Spinach, chard, lettuce, garlic, fava bean sprouts, miner’s lettuce, carrots, parsnips and garlic chives … with some other seeds just starting to sprout, too.

fresh greens

Blooming geranium, nearly ripe lemons and just a hint of the peach tree awaiting transplant.

Blooming geranium, nearly ripe lemons and just a hint of the peach tree awaiting transplant.

"Christmas" cactus embracing the bloom in April.

“Christmas” cactus embracing the bloom in April.

The avocado tree is making a comeback after a very rough winter -- lots of new leaves starting to come out. We have her on the front porch next to the rebounder. Perhaps she's taking inspiration to "rebound."

The avocado tree is making a comeback after a very rough winter — lots of new leaves starting to come out. We have her on the front porch next to the rebounder. Perhaps she’s taking inspiration to “rebound.”

New plum tree awaiting transplant outside once the outdoor trees show similar leaf levels.

New plum tree awaiting transplant outside once the outdoor trees show similar leaf levels.

We’ve also got the slightest hints of tulips and hyacinths outside, the regreening of the yarrow, irises beginning to stir back to life, and chives starting to green themselves again, baby dandelion leaves, fava bean sprouts in the tiered raised beds, garlic and shallots all over the place, stirrings of alpine strawberries and just the tiniest, subtle green on the perennial sea kale. Yes, indeed, despite the brown, greys and wild temperature swings, life goes on!

14 responses to this post.

  1. yay! can’t wait to see and taste when there 😉

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  2. looking good Laura!

    Liked by 1 person

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  3. […] Read and see the rest of the story at: http://www.laurabruno.wordpress.com / link to original article […]

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  4. Posted by Gordon Yumibe on April 4, 2015 at 12:39 am

    Laura,
    I saw that you were using straw to mulch…was wondering how that works….am considering using straw also but was concerned how that works as far as breaking down and becoming incorporated into the soil…was thinking of using orchard grass as an alternative…

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    • Hi Gordon,
      I’m not sure how it works as a mulch. I don’t like how it looks, but the gardeners and farmers I know here all use straw mulch, so I thought I’d give it a go this year. I’ve used it before in lasagna gardening, but not as a top mulch. My understanding is that it breaks down well. I’m hoping to attract fewer earwigs than with leaf mulch. They really do a number on my crops and have resulted in slugs getting a much larger blame than they deserved! Anyway, we’ll see how the straw goes. I have bags and bags of leaves, too. I don’t know anything about orchard grass. My main concern with the straw is that I doubt it’s organic. At some point, I have to figure that with all the wood mulch, earthworms and mycellium, things will take care of themselves. If you’re wanting to be totally pure, then maybe the orchard grass is better. I have rye seeds for a fall cover crop, which I thought to grow and then use that as the mulch; however, I’ve since heard rye is toxic to new plants for the first three weeks after cutting. That kind of dampened my enthusiasm!

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      • Thanks Laura…leaning towards straw…possible draw back on orchard grass may be amount of seeds…

        Not sure about using rye as cover crop…seems to be other choices available that I have been reading about…

        First year back gardening….haven’t got anything in ground but just got about 5 yards compost spread…

        Plan on getting an asparagus bed set up for next year…am trying that method using wood underneath the surface covered with some manure, soil, and compost…

        Cheers!

        Gordon

        Forgot…planted two plum trees along with an apple and a cherry as well !!

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