Reclaiming Art in the Age of Artifice

Thanks to Jamie at Sophia’s Children for bringing this rich post to my attention. It’s particularly timely as I’m reading Leonard Shlain’s “The Alphabet Versus the Goddess,” which explores how art and images were systematically suppressed in order to usher in the most patriarchal, controlling societies.
From this post, which explores the differences between art and artifice, encouraging us to reclaim art from the media and the smoke and mirrors wizards (quoting JF Martell): “…in a very real sense, mass media is a spiritual machine for colonizing the psyche. It establishes an emotional climate favoring the replacement of living thought by the memes of the market. Achieving this has less to do with outright censorship than with aesthetic framing. It isn’t the content of what is presented that matters, but how that content is portrayed. ”
“Authoritarian societies recognize the power of art, which is why they so brutally censor their best artists. Free market societies, on the other hand, adopt a strategy of suppression by appropriation. We tolerate artists so far as they make themselves useful as purveyors of distraction or producers of luxury commodities to be hawked in staid galleries and concert halls. Artworks that criticize the tenets of the system are accepted precisely because by their very powerlessness, they implicitly condone the practices they outwardly condemn. The fight is fixed: you can say anything because whatever you say won’t make a difference.”
Like so many sacred things — Nature, our connection to our bodies and the Earth, Goddess energies, poetry, paradox and music, we need to reclaim the power of art.

An Elegant Mystery

“I think the weird is present in all great artworks, if by that we mean works that lays reality bare instead of placating us with illusions.” – J.F. Martell



(From the publisher)
“Part treatise, part critique, part call to action, RECLAIMING ART IN THE AGE OF ARTIFICE is a journey into the uncanny realities revealed to us in the great works of art of the past and present.”

“Received opinion holds that art is culturally-determined and relative. We are told that whether a picture, a movement, a text, or sound qualifies as a “work of art” largely depends on social attitudes and convention. Drawing on examples ranging from Paleolithic cave paintings to modern pop music and building on the ideas of James Joyce, Oscar Wilde, Gilles Deleuze, Carl Jung, and others, J.F. Martel argues that art is an inborn human phenomenon that precedes the formation of culture and even society…

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One response to this post.

  1. […] Massaro, and Matt Kahn (True Divine Nature). I have also been seeking guidance from blogger Laura Bruno, and reading the blog Angelicview. In the past I’ve read angel books by people like Doreen […]

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