Archive for January, 2015

Empath & Sensitives: ‘Withholding’ as a Toxic Tactic

Here’s a helpful article from Jamie at Sophia’s Children. I would just add the following observations:

Not that this applies to Jamie’s clients, but it may be relevant for some people reading — that in cases of narcissism, withholding “narcissistic supply” is not abusive. It’s a necessary coping mechanism and way out of toxic relationships.

Because narcissists don’t believe they have (ever) done anything wrong, someone’s withholding may seem like some kind of emotional blackmail, when, in fact, they have removed themselves from continuing an unhealthy, one-way relationship that will never return on investment. I think it’s important to include this topic here, because narcissists will often use any and all guilt maneuvers and trigger buttons to lure their supply back to them for another feast. People having courage to step away from that kind of dysfunction need to know that there’s a difference not only between being innocently “inconsiderate” or maliciously “manipulative,” but also the possibility that withholding represents a necessary step in the liberation process.

On the flip side, in these times of increased awareness, if a person finds him or herself suddenly surrounded by people withholding contact, praise, etc., it is worth at least a conscious look inside to make sure that the withholding isn’t in response to narcissistic behaviors on our own part. Things continue to rebalance, and since most narcissists don’t recognize themselves as being any part of problem relationships, taking an objective look at this possibility (or getting help doing so) can bring peace. If the other person turns out to be exhibiting narcissistic behaviors, then one need not feel guilty for withholding; if the person experiencing withholding recognizes areas where s/he has been too demanding or draining, then s/he has the opportunity to change patterns and make restitution.

Just wanted to add that to Jamie’s important insights, since the narcissism piece complicates an otherwise simpler issue. 🙂

Sophia's Children

Confidences, 1869, by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema. Confidences, 1869, by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema.

I always know that when a topic or theme comes up three or more times in less than a week that it’s an issue that’s ‘up’ at the moment. And I often put it on my writing roster, or bump it up in priority if it’s already on the list.

So after receiving emails from three clients in as many days about this particular, frustrating topic, and having it come up in a recent client session, it seems to be an ‘up’ issue.

It’s also a  perfect addition to the ongoing Empaths & Sensitives Series (which is also handy intel for interpersonal communication dynamics).

What’s the topic or theme at the moment? Withholding.

That’s right. The proverbial silent treatment or cold shoulder that leaves us (or others) wondering what the heck happened, and feeling confused and off-kilter as a result.

Interestingly, withholding is…

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Reminders, Resources, and Acknowledgements

Just a few things I find myself repeating in various forms to clients, blog readers, friends, family and acquaintances:

1) We’re now in Mercury Retrograde. Don’t be surprised by lost or delayed emails and snail mail, extra typos, messed up travel plans, miscommunications, overreactions and misunderstandings. Par for the course, folks. You can, however, find ways to thrive during a Mercury Retrograde. For those who could use some refresher tips, here’s a 2012 article with all sorts of explanations and suggestions.

2) The topic of friendship is front and center right now. I keep hearing from people facing major upheaval and frustration in their friendships and other close relationships. Part of this may be from the influence of #1, but the current major process of revision transcends a single astrological influence. In case you’ve been living under a rock, planet Earth faces too many extinction level challenges to name in one post without triggering panic. Have you ever known someone given a terminal diagnosis? Whether valid or not, that prospect usually initiates some soul searching:

“If I really might not have that much time left, how do I want to spend my remaining days? With whom do I want to spend my remaining time? How do I want to feel? What kind of legacy do I feel called to leave in my wake?” Whether conscious or not, humanity feels its impending terminal diagnosis, and individuals are in various stages of the corresponding soul crisis. It’s decision time, and some decisions are easier and more obvious than others.

Please don’t take things personally, and please don’t take my recognition of extinction level challenges as doom and gloom. Doing so would assume that I don’t believe people can rise to the challenge, and I very much sense that we each can. Whether we each will is a different story, but I know that we can. As I said, it’s decision time. Not everyone thrives on life or death choices. Some people panic, some push others away, some retreat and then return once they’ve gathered their thoughts and feelings. Consider tending to your own process and the influence that opens to you, rather than barreling uninvited into someone else’s intensely personal process.

3. Bodies need extra care right now. Please review Tom Kenyon’s message about Chaotic Nodes and how these affect the body. Even though he wrote that piece way back in crazy 2014, we’re still in those chaotic nodes. They’re increasing, not going away any time soon. Remember to honor your body’s needs if you want to make these transitions in body.

4. If you’re really at your wits’ end or even if you just want some extra support, I designed this month’s specials to help people move more easily through these energies. Please click here for details.

5. Remember to breathe — the cleaner the air, the better. For some of you that means indoor air with lots of plants, since outside is a chemtrail and car pollution soup. Get near some plants with leaves and inhale deeply. If you’re lucky enough to live somewhere with CO2 eating leaves outdoors, inhale deeply for the rest of us! Wherever you are, take at least a few moments to hug a tree and touch the ground. Your body is a part of the Earth, and reconnecting will balance the zips and zaps coming at us from all over the place. If you feel really challenged by the chemtrails, wifi, EMF pollution and other assaults, you might want to review this post on Amazing Orgone.

6. Design your own daily, monthly and seasonal rituals. These don’t need to be elaborate; they just need to be conscious and repeated. Rituals provide structure and grounding in the midst of chaos and confusion. They can also offer antidotes to the world’s current harshness, inviting us to reconnect with beauty, timelessness and alignment. A ritual can be as simple as a consciously appreciated and enjoyed cup of coffee or herbal tea or as elaborate as a group ceremony celebrating the Wheel of the Year. Listening to music, taking a well-timed cat nap, or wearing certain colors on certain days can all acquire ritual status. For additional ideas about designing a ritual, please see Laura Daligan’s recent video, “Ritual Corner.”

7. Whatever you’re going through, remind yourself that “This, too, shall pass.” Because, guess what? It will. Guaranteed. So long as humanity follows linear time, things will fade into the past, and as soon as humanity embraces the idea that all time is now, the act of consciously choosing what “time” to focus upon becomes an obvious option. Enjoy the journey; it’s one heckuva a ride. 🙂

The surrender to modern education: brainwashing

Reclaiming More History: Ancient Giants in America

This post goes along with some of my recent posts on reclaiming women’s history (here and here), and is also a follow-up to an earlier post on the Smithsonian’s cover-up of all the giant skeletons in America. It turns out there were thousands more skeletons than most people knew. While the Smithsonian’s admission of the cover-up was satire, the cover-up itself is no joke. Today’s interview of author and researcher Richard J. Dewhurst will be a real paradigm buster for most people. I’ve known of the giants for a long, long time (maybe since birth), but even I learned a lot in this interview. Thanks, Mitch! Here’s the Red Ice Radio description, followed by the videos:

The Ancient Giants Who Ruled America

“Richard J. Dewhurst is the Emmy Award–winning writer of the HBO feature documentary Dear America: Letters Home from Vietnam. A graduate of NYU with degrees in journalism, film, and television, he has written and edited for the History Channel, the Arts & Entertainment Channel, PBS, Fox Television and Fox Films, ABC News, TNT, Paramount Pictures, and the Miami Herald. He lives in Vermont. We’ll discuss his book, The Ancient Giants Who Ruled America. Drawing on 400 years of newspaper articles and photos, first person accounts, state historical records, and illustrated field reports, Richard J. Dewhurst reveals not only that North America was once ruled by an advanced race of giants but also that the Smithsonian has been actively suppressing the physical evidence for nearly 150 years.

“He’ll discuss how thousands of giant skeletons have been unearthed at Mound Builder sites across the continent, only to disappear from the historical record. We’ll hear about giant discoveries in locations such as Nevada, Florida, California and the ruins of the giants’ cities with populations in excess of 100,000 in Arizona, Oklahoma, Alabama, and Louisiana. In the second hour, Dewhurst speaks more on the suppression of this evidence and the cover up. Today, ancient mounds have no official protection and are being bulldozed for parking lots. American Indians are preventing research of mounds, although they admit they did not build them. We’ll hear about where some of the giants’ bones are today.

“Richards also talks about an old, advanced nautical culture and ancient European migration to the USA. Later, we discuss the distorted picture of what America was like despite evidence of a coordinated social structure that celebrated making earth a sacred landscape, long before our arrival.”

Relevant links (actual links can be found here) ++ http://www.redicecreations.com/radio/…
Michigan Copper in the Mediterranean
Lenape
Smithsonian Institution Building
Charles_Hapgood
megalithic.co.uk/index.php
Spirit Cave mummy
Poverty Point
Portland cement
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act
Pyramid Mound

Music
Conan the Barbarian (1982) – The Riddle of Steel

Books & DVDs
The Ancient Giants Who Ruled America: The Missing Skeletons and the Great Smithsonian Cover-Up

Continue listening to part two here.

EcoSense for Living: Food Fight

Thank you, Ella!

Think you know what GMO’s are and where they’re found? This video will probably give you additional information, and it’s a great way to educate friends, family members and neighbors. Unfortunately, we need to get these things banned, before they pollute our entire food chain, as well as our water, air and land.

From YouTube:

For the latest from Calton Nutrition, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/CaltonNews
——————-Click To See More—————————
SUBSCRIBE to our channel for updates on our latest videos! The quality and accessibility of food has been a hot button issue throughout the ages. Lack of secure food has been the source of revolutions and toppled governments. In “Food Fight,” we look at the tug of war over America’s diet. From questions plaguing genetically-modified ingredients to wheat-free/gluten-free concerns to the rapid decline of bees, we explore pressures on the safety and security of our food supply. Rich Food, Poor Food authors, Jayson and Mira Calton, guide us through a grocery store and reveal how to make smart choices and avoid unwanted ingredients.

A very important YouTube comment:

I want to thank the Ecosense team for bringing to light the number of corn additives like citric acid, vinegar and maltodextrin that are in our food.  It would be great if they would also mention that GMO corn derivatives are also used to fortify milk – including organic milk.  All vitamin D fortified milk contains corn oil as a carrier with propylene glycol, a corn derivative.  Additionally, organic meat can be cleaned with citric acid and packaged with soaker pads saturated with citric acid.  The arm of the USDA that issues organic certification allows this (according to a large organic chicken manfacturer).

Ancient Mother

From YouTube:

Enjoy the Beauty of Mother Earth on Music by Robert Gass. Track “Ancient Mother” from the CD “Discovering Spirit in Sound Chanting”. For the free wallpapers used in this clip, please visit http://www.naturedesktop.org

  • Music

    • “Ancient Mother” by Robert Gass & On Wings Of Song ( • • • )

Kathleen Wildwood ~ Long Herbal Infusions: Why Drink Nourishing Long Herbal Infusions?

This is a timely post from the lovely Kathleen Wildwood of The Wildwood Institute. David and I had the pleasure of attending many of her herb walks, classes and two wild edibles dinners hosted by Kathleen when we lived in Madison. I was just thinking about making a nettle infusion when her email came through offering permission to post her new article.

Long Herbal Infusions

Why Drink Nourishing Long Herbal Infusions? 

By Kathleen R. Wildwood, © 2015

          During the winter, people ask me what they can do to make up for the generous consumption of sweets, beer and other comfort foods and drinks that people use to keep up their spirits in the dark of the year. Though you cannot make up for the impact of these foods on your metabolism, you can drink nourishing long herbal infusions to help replace the nutrients lost, reduce cravings for less healthy beverages and foods, and help heal all kinds of health issues all the year round.

          Nourishing long herbal infusions provide large quantities of calcium and other minerals, vitamins, essential fatty acids and proteins in their most natural form.They also contain anti-cancer phytochemicals and antioxidants, as well as unique combinations of specific nutrients for building healthy bones, supporting the immune system, calming the nerves, stabilizing blood sugar, improving digestion and more, depending on the herb(s) you choose. They are much more effective than nutritional supplements due to their superior absorbability. They are also safer and significantly less expensive!

          I have seen nourishing long herbal infusions, taken over time, heal the following health problems: osteoporosis, anxiety, adrenal burnout, eczema, diabetes, sinus problems, severe allergies, hormonal difficulties, infertility, joint pain, high blood pressure, and more. Please note that there are other herbal preparations that can be used to heal some of these conditions and that the choice of herb matters. However, all nourishing long infusions will provide large amounts of nutrition that cannot be obtained from teas or tinctures.

Working with people as a practitioner over the last several decades, I have noticed that there is no single other food or beverage which can have such a powerful impact on improving health in everyday life, no matter what your health issues are. Drinking long herbal infusions helps people to have more energy and resilience during stressful times. People sleep better because they have enough nutrients to soothe and support their nervous system. Many a time I’ve had a client or student tell me that when they begin to drink nourishing long herbal infusions on a regular basis, their cravings for unhealthy beverages such as soda are reduced or eliminated. I have found that this approach of adding nutrition first, rather than cutting out all the “bad” foods, accomplishes the goal of greater health without as much trauma and struggle. Often, the craving for “bad” foods (usually stimulants and sedatives) occurs because the body is desperate to function without the nutrition it needs. Give it the nutrition, it doesn’t need the stimulants/sedatives as much.

          Why a long infusion, as opposed to a tea? Because you can get certain nutrients out of a dried plant only after soaking it in hot water for a long time. Scientific studies have shown that it takes at least four hours for a significant amount of minerals to extract into the water, and longer (up to eight hours) for roots, which are tougher and take longer to release their medicinal constituents into the water. If you make a cup of nettle tea (1-2 teaspoons steeped in hot water for ten minutes), you would get about 5-10 mg of calcium, but if you make a cup of nettle long infusion (1 oz. steeped in 1 quart hot water for a minimum of four hours), you will get over 200 mg of calcium per cup. And not just the calcium, but all the nutritional co-factors necessary to effectively assimilate calcium, because calcium by itself is not well utilized by the body.

          Not all herbs lend themselves to a useful preparation as a long infusion. A long brew makes some herbs unpalatable. This is nature’s way of saying you don’t need that much of those strong medicinal constituents, and that this preparation may even be harmful. As a young herbalist (if I had dared to call myself that in those days), I remember hearing about long infusions and thinking, yes, this is the way to go! So I made myself some St. John’s Wort long infusion. Can some of you guess what happened? I nearly gagged on the resulting brew – the word “vile” comes to mind! That is because St. John’s Wort contains a larger number of medicinal constituents that are stimulating/sedating, and a smaller number that are primarily nourishing – just the opposite of what we want in a long infusion.

          Although this particular herb is too strong (stimulating/sedating) to prepare as a long infusion, it does work quite well as a tincture. Herbs that are aromatic, intensely bitter or otherwise strongly stimulating/sedating are better as teas, tinctures or other preparations. Examples of herbs that are safe as teas but that could be harmful or even toxic as a long infusion are chamomile and black tea.

          Herbs that do make effective long infusions have the following properties: One, their medicinal constituents (phytochemicals) are primarily nutritive rather than stimulating/sedating. This is what gives nourishing long infusions their characteristic tastes: bland, sweet or earthy. Two, their medicinal constituents are best extracted into water (rather than alcohol, for example). There are many herbs to choose from, depending on your needs – see the list below. Each long infusion herb has its own medicinal properties, actions and uses in addition to its nutrition – choose one or more based on your health needs and your sense of taste.

          Nourishing long herbal infusions can be enjoyed on a one-time basis to provide nutrition, thereby improving your energy and performance for the day. They can also be used on a regular basis as part of a healthy diet. Some people like to rotate them for variety, while others stick with one herb over a length of time as a tonic to help treat a particular health condition (2 cups daily for a minimum of two months). It’s fine to add honey, milk or a pinch of cinnamon, and you can drink them warm, iced or room temperature – listen to your body’s preferences.

          Long infusions are easy to make (instructions included below), and one pound is enough for one month’s supply of two cups of infusion daily. Though they need to steep for a length of time, they don’t take any longer to actually make than a regular cup of tea. You may be surprised to discover that some family members take to long infusions happily and naturally, with their improved mood and resilience of benefit to everyone. One of my apprentices has a fifteen year old son who likes his oatstraw infusion so much he makes it for himself on a regular basis. I use long herbal infusions as my daily beverage, and when I don’t drink them, I can tell how much they help by what I am missing: energy, stamina, and steady nerves. Get your year off to a nourishing start by using the instructions below to make long herbal infusions for yourself!

 

Long Infusion Herbs and a few of their uses

Oatstraw strong and steady nerves, stable blood sugar, osteoporosis, eczema

Nettle – energy, adrenal restorative, hormonal normalizer, immune, lungs, osteoporosis, vein and circulatory tonic, digestion

Comfrey – strengthens and heals bones, tendons and ligaments, repairs inflamed tissues in the digestive system and skin, memory

Mullein – lungs, coughs, congestion, anti-inflammatory and anti-spasmodic

Red Clover – nerves, lungs, lymph, fertility, hot flashes

 

 

How to Make a Long Herbal Infusion

1.    Take one ounce of chosen dried herb (Your best guesstimate is ok if you don’t have a scale.) Rough guide: 1/8 to ¼ of a jar. Less for finely ground herbs, less for heavier herbs like roots, more for fluffy herbs that take up a lot of room.

2.    Place in a canning jar. Use a one quart jar for leaves (such as comfrey), or hardy flowers (such as red clover), one pint jar for roots, barks, or berries (such as burdock root or rose hips).

3.    Cover completely with boiling water, stir with chopstick or knife and add more water until full.

4.    Place lid on, and let sit four to eight hours for leaves or hardy flowers (such as red clover), eight hours for roots. Many people make their infusions in the evening and then strain them in the morning.

5.     When done brewing, strain and refrigerate. Infusion will keep for 48 hours in the refrigerator. (After that, the proteins start to break down and the brew will taste off.)

6.    Infusions may be reheated (preferably do not boil, but still OK to drink if it does boil), iced, sweetened, milk added, etc. Some do well with salt or tamari, such as nettle.

 

Most infusions contain large quantities of calcium, magnesium and other minerals, including trace minerals, in their most absorbable form. They also contain essential fatty acids, vitamins and protein. In addition, they each have particular medicinal qualities, actions and uses.

Many nourishing and tonifying herbs can be used as long infusions, including Oatstraw, Comfrey leaves, Red Clover blossoms, Nettle leaves/stalks, Violet leaves, Linden blossoms, Chickweed herb, Burdock root, Dandelion root.

 

© Kathleen Wildwood 2015

Corbett Report ~ Solutions: Guerrilla Gardening

Best Corbett Report ever!

I have previously seen many of the food industry and guerrilla gardening clips, but I love how they’ve put this together. The last 4.5 minutes with Joel Salatin are particularly worthwhile: “Anything worth doing is worth doing poorly — at first.” True to James Corbett’s New Year’s Resolution to report news that’s working and solution-oriented news that changes the world for the better, James himself commits to learning how to garden, even if he faces challenges in the beginning.

Pamela “Pixie” Colman Smith – A “Rich” Soul Whose Works & Life Continue to Inspire Millions

“Pixie” has a very special place in my heart, too. Much love and thanks for bringing this article to light, Tania!

Tania Marie

Pamela Colman Smith - Pixie

I’ve been meaning to share about this soulful creatrix and today inspiration led me to do so, first in an article by Beth Maiden, honoring her works and spirit, followed by my own collected shares below.

This is a wonderful article and tribute to the artist, Pamela Colman Smith (also known as “Pixie” or “PCS”) of the most widely known Tarot deck in the world, the Rider Waite Tarot – now referred to by many as the Rider-Waite-Smith Tarot, as people have come to honor Pamela’s name, where for a long time it had been omitted.

The article is a celebration not only of Pamela, but also of the creative arts (which she lived her life constantly immersed in and channeling), of the contributions of women, and the value and honor both are deserving of in helping to shape the world and the foundations it is built upon.

Pamela not…

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Un-Erasing ‘Women Who Know’ – Restoring the Ancestral Lineage

This is too good not to share. Jamie creates a wonderful riff off my earlier Max Dashu post and introduces the scholarly work of Barbara Tedlock, Ph.D. Tedlock’s book, “The Woman in the Shaman’s Body” reveals the deliberate cover-up of women’s traditional roles as shamans around the world. At a time when “Sophianic scholars” continue to put a patriarchal spin on shamanism and Goddess traditions, I find Tedlock’s (and Jamie’s) work a welcome relief and breath of fresh air! Thanks again to Jamie for writing this post!

Sophia's Children

Russian postcard based on a photo taken in 1908 by S.I. Borisov, showing a female shaman, of probable Khakas ethnicity.[17] By Sergei Ivanovich Borislov (1867-1931). Public domain image courtesy of Wikimedia. Russian postcard based on a photo taken in 1908 by S.I. Borisov, showing a female shaman, of probable Khakas ethnicity.[17] By Sergei Ivanovich Borislov (1867-1931). Public domain image courtesy of Wikimedia. In her excellent book, The Woman in the Shaman’s Body*, Barbara Tedlock, Ph.D., shares this about the origin and meaning of the word shaman:

“The term shaman itself comes from the Evenki language in Siberia, and means “the one who knows.” Other general words for shaman, such as Finnish tietäjä, Japanese munusu, Bella Coola kusiut, Nahuatl tlamatiquetl, and Quichua yachaj, all have the same meaning.”

The same is true for other cultures around the world in the words for seers, wise women, shaman: Veleda, Filidh, Cailleach Feasa, Haegtessa, Wicce (which meant ‘wise’) … the list goes on.

Thankfully, due to more recent integrity-centered scholarship, we’re learning more and more about the long-running…

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