Finding Your Own Center

It’s always so interesting to read or watch world or national events “unfold” online and then have a session with someone from that area who usually provides me with very different details and experiences. So far today I’ve spoken with someone in Japan (who initially contacted me right after Fukushima) and another person who just left Kiev and plans to return for awhile to see their lover before returning to their own country. Tomorrow, I speak with a Nevadan who happens to be married to a California farmer who’s well aware of “riparian rights” and the huge implications of “changing regulations.”

I have another friend traveling in Japan and China right now, and Goshen’s got a large Ukranian population — not that I know any of them. Yesterday, I received word that my high school experienced a “three hour lockdown” as someone had called to say armed men entered the school. Police later determined that call to be a hoax, but the students spent three terrified hours with minimal to no information on why they couldn’t go home as usual.

This is a short post, because I don’t have much time today. My point is that wherever dramatic, “newsworthy” things happen, they happen to individuals. No matter what right wing, left wing, ethnic or age group we hear about from alternative or mainstream media, we will never receive the full, true story. How could we when so many people experience the exact same stimuli in different ways? How could we when for every person for whom a policy has helped, we can find many for whom it hasn’t helped?

My own preference, and that of most of the people with whom I speak in sessions, is for peace, freedom, love and respect — for each other, for the environment and for ourselves. No one likes to feel manipulated, and few people realize they’re being manipulated until some distance and recentering allows them to find themselves again. Rather than waiting to recenter after traumatic events, we can make it our own personal practice to recenter every day, every hour, every moment that we feel off balance. We can choose to breathe. We can choose to ask for inspiration to act wisely and calmly and with compassion. We can remove ourselves from situations that become more obvious for throwing us off center. The more we practice this, the less fear we generate, and the more clearly we can walk our own path.

If we live in a world of people centering themselves, we will live in a calmer, more loving, less manipulated world, but we can’t make others’ decisions for them. We can, however, commit to ourselves each day that we will center, breathe and allow that calm presence to radiate from the center of our beings. From that place of inner stillness — even if just for a few moments each day — we can re-member our world and re-create our world in powerful and effective ways.

That’s all I have time to share today, but this post spills over from so many sessions of talking with people in the midst of “danger zones” or “news events” — who are really just talking with me about pretty normal life decisions. Life goes on … and we continue to hold the possibility for influencing the general direction life takes.

Many blessings to you on the journey ….

3 responses to this post.

  1. very true. it’s really the best place we can move from (our center(s)). i appreciate your words on this not-oft-spoken-of, yet essential approach. ❤ wren

    Like

  2. Reblogged this on Laura Bruno's Blog and commented:

    Another 2014 post wants to go up again. Just substitute today’s headlines for the ones I mentioned then. My heart goes out to anyone facing challenges or feeling like another guru, politician, city, and/or religion has let you down. More and more, we need to return to our own true center, from which we radiate any positive influence we can ever hope to have in this world. Your path is YOUR path, and your path always offers choices.

    Coming back to center allows us to address the scary things from a position of strength, to grieve the loss from a place of regeneration, to transmute anger or outrage into positive, healing actions. Peace in, peace out. This, too, shall pass.

    Liked by 1 person

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: