Pity or Respect?

More Fukushima article fall-out, but thank you, “Nine,” for opening this line of discussion:

Nine says:
January 9, 2014 at 3:48 am

Dearest Jean and dearest Laura….

Is not fear maybe the best “gieger counter”……as it were….

I would think that one would explore what dear Goldwing had to say…..

All I can say is that where I live….and so shh…it is a secret and all I can say is that where I live and all of that land around me is a spiritual place and I will not leave it…..no matter….

The thought of not going outside to commune with such power and beauty is well….not an option for me….

This is the feminine side of things….

The masculine side is saying…..we need to take up arms….to fight…..to protect……..

And so it is a war of the unseen….

Dearest Laura….

Might I quote you?

“I do, however, also occasionally interact with people who don’t even know what Fukushima is, who have no idea why we’d want to avoid GMO’s or even what they are, who think “energy work” involves an electrician, and who live paycheck to paycheck from jobs that don’t require them to think beyond the immediately pressing details of their lives.”

Can I move to where you live? Please tell me where that place is?

Umm…..that is the American condition…..as it were….what you described in that comment…..

And so I totally understand what you are saying….and it is quite true you know…..

I am not calling you on this I am just saying that since this is how things are with many folks could you have pity? I mean upon us for our ignorance…..

I simply have decided to look within for guidance since when I look out I get so confused…..

Oh….and yes great healing comes from within….I have experienced some of this stuff…..

I have few answers….

Nine
Reply

laurabruno says:

January 9, 2014 at 9:53 pm

I do not pity people, but I do believe in empowering them to help themselves. I live in Goshen, IN where we are actively working to connect schools, soup kitchens, funding for entrepreneurial enterprises for the unemployed and underemployed, churches, homeless shelters, community gardens, community organizations, food banks and Seed to Feed gardens for food banks, co-housing opportunities, and local government together so that we can all share and brainstorm resources to help lift Elkhart County out of the severe (most severe crash in 2008 of anywhere in the US–was on Obama’s campaign trail for that reason alone) poverty that occurred nearly six years ago.

I only moved here in November 2012 to care for my boyfriend’s aging parents, but I am proud to be a part of this community. People care about each other enough to spend their free time learning Spanish so we can communicate better with people who have expressed a need for us to learn their language. People care about each other enough to donate massive amounts of homegrown produce to food banks and the local soup kitchen. Unlike most soup kitchens, this one serves anyone who wants to eat there. Some people pay and some people don’t. It is not considered a stigma to eat there, unlike most soup kitchens.

We are surrounded by Amish people, and most of the people in our town, even if considered way below the poverty line, find time to volunteer and to make music together. A benefit concert this holiday sent over $1,100 directly to Phillipines relief, as well as money to help a local family whose house burned down that same weekend. These were donations from people who don’t have much if any money to spare.

Some know about Fukushima. Others just know about their neighbors and their family. They don’t know what a GMO is. I don’t pity them, because they are some of the purist, most loving people I have ever encountered in 40+ locations all over the US –from Lake Tahoe and Monterey, to New Mexico, Sedona, Chicago, Madison… Oftentimes people here apologize for how their town isn’t fancy or as progressive as California. I tell them what they have here–what we have here– is priceless. So no, I don’t pity people. I do look forward to gardening with them and continuing to help some of the local high school kids whose parents are in jail or other circumstances–to continue helping these amazing kids interact with caring adults in our community. They are great kids who deserve respect, not pity, and they appreciate people who see them as fellow humans despite their differences.

Blessings to you in your sacred land. All land is sacred, as is the delicate realm between human hearts.

3 responses to this post.

  1. Reblogged this on Spirit In Action and commented:
    Thank you Laura! I’m crying from awe, relief and joy. Your town and your attitude is exactly what we need to return us all to living sacred lives on all the sacred land-that is every inch if this beautiful Earth. When we can come together in our communities across perceived differences to help one another and all living beings then we make one another sacred, and every moment sacred. Life as it was for the ancestors, becomes a prayer.
    Im not afraid of radiation
    or even the toxics that
    have already harmed me
    and continue to do so, as
    much as I worry about the
    disconnection of all life or
    at least the disconnect of humans from one another and all living beings.

    Like

    Reply

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